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Holocaust Diary Track important World War II happenings Analyze how the texts we are reading show the experience of the Holocaust Keep a log of domain.

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Presentation on theme: "Holocaust Diary Track important World War II happenings Analyze how the texts we are reading show the experience of the Holocaust Keep a log of domain."— Presentation transcript:

1 Holocaust Diary Track important World War II happenings Analyze how the texts we are reading show the experience of the Holocaust Keep a log of domain specific words related to the Holocaust

2 What are domain-specific words? Domain-specific words are words that relate to a certain field or topic. Sports examples Science examples Discuss what you already know about the Holocaust. What are some domain-specific words related to the Holocaust?

3 Holocaust Diary Holocaust Diary instructions: Fold five sheets of blank computer paper in half Staple near top and bottom to create a booklet Label the cover “Holocaust Diary” and include your name The left side of each page will have the year, topic, and title of the text we are reading The right side will be for domain specific words and phrases

4 Year: Topic Title of text Answer the following: What central ideas does this text help you understand about the Holocaust? Support your position with specific evidence from the text. Domain specific words and definitions

5 1933 – 1938: Hitler rises to power in Germany “Twentieth Century Monsters” What central ideas does this text help you understand about the Holocaust? Support your position with specific evidence from the text. Dictator: Nationalism: Fascism: Nazi: Communism: Totalitarian:

6 Dictator (noun): a ruler who has complete power.

7 Nationalism (noun): devotion to one's nation.

8 Fascism (noun): a system of government characterized by a dictator, racism, and military control.

9 Nazi (noun): a member of the political party that held power in Germany from 1933 to 1945.

10 Communism (noun): a system in which all factories, farms, and other valuable things are controlled by the government.

11 Totalitarian (adjective): used to describe a government that has complete control over the people.

12 Domain-specific language What do you notice about this set of words? Choose two of the words and explain how they are similar, then explain how the two words are actually different. Choose another set of the words and explain how they are similar, then explain how the two words are actually different. Explain why these words are domain specific to the Holocaust; how are they related to this event in history?

13 Interaction of Ideas, Events, and Individuals Describe Germany after World War I (before Hitler came to power). Explain the events that let to this. Who was Hitler and what were his major ideas about government? How did Hitler’s ideas change Germany? Compare and contrast the events and ideas going on in Germany with what was happening in other countries (Japan, Spain, Italy, Russia). Describe what was going on in America when Hitler came to power. Explain how these events caused our nation to ignore what was happening in the rest of the world.

14 : Hitler invades Poland to begin WWII and Jews are moved to ghettos “The Ghettos” ghettos: concentration camps: Star of David: 1.Why did the Nazis create the ghettos? 2.What lies did the Nazis tell to justify the ghettos? 3.How did the ghettos affect the Jewish people?

15 : Hitler invades Poland to begin WWII and Jews are moved to ghettos For each of the below, find a direct quote that, for you, best captures the experience of being a Jew at this time. The Book Thief Daniel’s Story Using domain-specific language, write a journal entry as if you were a Jew in this time. Include reference to the ways ideas, events, and people influenced each other (use ideas from our class discussion).

16 Daniel’s Story Questions Complete the text discussion questions on your own sheet of paper. Write each question then answer in 2-3 complete sentences. Use quotes or specific evidence from the text whenever possible. Each question is worth 15 points; the ERQ is worth 50 points. When answering the ERQ, be sure to APE (Answer the question, prove your answer with evidence from the text, and explain your evidence).

17 Daniel’s Story Questions 1.Why did Daniel stop taking pictures? 2.What happened to Uncle Peter? 3.In this chapter, what laws were changing the lives of the Jews? 4.Why did Daniel stop trying at school? 5.Why were his parents distracted? 6.Describe the process of Jews being deported. 7.Why were the women of Daniel’s family so upset by the body- search? 8.Name and describe the place where the trains took Daniel and his family. 9.In this part of the story, what things made Daniel feel better? 10.What do Daniel’s pictures show him about what is happening in Germany? ERQ: Analyze how Hitler’s ideas and laws affected Daniel. Provide at least TWO specific examples from the text and explain how they support your analysis.

18 1940: Germany tries to bomb Britain into surrendering Churchill gave this speech soon after he was chosen as Prime Minister of England. As you are reading, think about the events that led to this speech and evaluate what Churchill is asking for. On the parallel lines, paraphrase this speech in your own words. While you are reading, check the British government domain-specific words to help you understand the speech.

19 Tone Tone is the author’s attitude toward the topic. For instance, the tone of a piece could be happy, sad, hopeful, gloomy, arrogant, humble, serious, formal, worried, judgmental, etc. The words that authors choose reveal their tone. Look for words that carry heavy emotional meaning or that are repeated several times.

20 Tone The Book Thief “The drizzle made them look like ghosts. Not humans, but shapes, moving about beneath the lead-colored clouds.” What is the tone in this passage? What words reveal that tone? “Twentieth Century Monsters” “Imagine a country letting its meanest, worst people take charge. Imagine giving those kinds of people the power of life and death over the whole nation. Imagine a nation where children are taught to be tattletales and tell the secret policy about anyone who protests – even their parents.” What is the tone in this passage? What words reveal that tone?

21 Tone Activity Put a box around words or phrases that have an emotional feel or might reveal tone. On the lined side, write what type of emotion goes with each boxed word. Underline words that are repeated several times. On the lined side, explain why Churchill would repeat these words. Circle the main idea, the sentence that best reveals what Churchill is arguing for.

22 1940: Germany tries to bomb Britain into surrendering “Blood, Sweat, Toil, and Tears” Describe the tone in Churchill’s speech. Identify words or phrases that reveal this tone and explain how they support your answer. (ERQ Format) 1.What was Churchill arguing for in his speech? 2.How did he make this case to his listeners? What arguments/persuas ive techniques did he use?

23 Connotation/Denotation Denotation is the main dictionary definition of a word. Connotation is the emotional or cultural association with a word. To understand emotional connotation, think about how the word compares positively or negatively with its synonyms (other words that mean the same thing). For instance, calling someone “ugly” connotes a more negative than calling someone “unattractive” To understand cultural connotation, think about how we use the word in our culture. For instance, Hollywood connotes not just a place in California, but stardom, glitz, glamour Words with connotations help discover the tone the author is using.

24 Connotation Activity Rank the following groups of words from negative to positive: Unattractive, plain, ugly Home, residence, ghetto Thin, skinny, bony Intelligent, egghead, brilliant Concentration camp, relocation center, prison

25 Connotation Activity Explain the cultural connotation for each of the following words; what do you mean if you call someone a: Snake Monster Chicken

26 Pearl Harbor Background Info Japan was allied with Germany, so we had cut off trade with them and were negotiating. The Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, an island in Hawaii where the Pacific Fleet was headquartered. Almost all of the American planes on the island were destroyed. Most of the warships were crippled or sunk. More than 2400 soldiers, sailors, and civilians were killed.

27 Connotation Activity Labe the top of the paper “Connotation and Tone” and put the names of your group. For each of the highlighted words, put a blue box around it if the connotation is positive and a red box around it if the connotation is negative. In the space on one side, use the thesaurus to find a synonym with a different connotation for ten of the words. Deceive = Bluff In the space on the other side, describe the overall tone in Roosevelt’s speech. Identify connotative words or phrases that reveal this tone and explain how they support your answer. (ERQ Format)

28 Written Vs. Audio/Video Think/Pair/Share: What would be different about reading a speech versus listening to or watching one? Effect of the audience Gestures Tone of voice Facial expressions Think/Pair/Share: What wouldn’t change between reading a speech and listening to or watching one? Tone of word choice Topic of speech Purpose of speech Historical context and speaker

29 Written Vs. Audio/Video Partial, live video recording: Full, live audio recording: Pearl Harbor film clip: Complete the Venn diagram comparing the written version to the audio/video version. What words stand out while reading? What words stand out while watching? How does the written version bring out emotion (tone of word choice, connotation)? How does the audio/video version bring out emotion (gestures, facial expressions, audience, tone of voice)? How does the written version sound in your head? How does the President’s voice sound? What effect does the audience have? Describe the tone in both. Describe the purpose for both.

30 1941: Japan bombs Pearl Harbor “Declaration of War on Japan” Write the quote from Roosevelt’s speech that best captures his powerful speaking ability. Write a diary entry as if you were an American citizen from this time period describing how the event of Pearl Harbor and President Roosevelt’s speech affected you.

31 Roosevelt and Churchill How were Churchill and Roosevelt similar? How were Churchill and Roosevelt different? These men met several times over the course of the war to discuss their countries and ideas. Write an imaginary, scripted conversation between these two great leaders. It should include: Words they might actually choose (consider tone/connotation). Ideas and topics they would be discussing at that time. Domain-specific language from WWII.

32 1942: Nazis begin murder of Jews in concentration camps “Murder of Millions” List and define domain-specific words. List and explain specific quotes that show ways the war affected the Jews. Night List and define domain-specific words. List and explain specific quotes that show ways the war affected the Jews.

33 Practice ERQ In “Murder of Millions” and Night, the authors are writing about the Holocaust. Analyze how the war impacted the Jews. Provide at least TWO specific examples from the text and explain how they support your analysis.

34 The Diary of a Young Girl Background Info Anne Frank received her diary on her thirteenth birthday: June 12, She lived in the Netherlands, a country invaded by Germany. When Anne’s older sister was summoned by the S.S., the Frank family decided to go into hiding. On July 6, 1942, the Frank family entered the “Secret Annex” behind the office of Otto Frank (Anne’s father). The Frank family was hiding with another family, the Van Pels (sometimes called the Van Daans in some versions); the Van Pels had a fifteen year old boy named Peter. While in the annex, the families had little food and little to do. Anne and Margot tried to keep up with their school studies. Miep Gies, an employee of Mr. Frank who was not a Jew, helped the families by bringing food and supplies. On August 4, 1944, the German police stormed the Annex and took away the families; they had been betrayed, but nobody knows by who. Anne and Margot both died in a concentration camp in March 1945, only a few weeks before the camp was liberated.

35 The Diary of a Young Girl Discussion Questions On your own sheet of paper, write each question and then answer it in at least 2-3 complete sentences. 1.Describe the structure (organization, parts) of a diary. 2.Explain how the diary’s structure helps a reader understand it. 3.Analyze how the war specifically affected Anne and the families in the Annex in these few diary entries. 4.Analyze how the war affected Jews in Holland outside of the Annex (according to these diary entries). 5.Explain why Anne feels that writing is important. 6.Discuss some ways that you relate to Anne Frank. Explain how reading her story in the format of a diary makes this possible. 7.Explain how reading Anne’s diary offers insight into her character, especially her courage.

36 1943: Jews in hiding “Going into Hiding” Explain how the war affected the Jews according to these passages. Number the Stars Referencing the passages, explain why non-Jews would have had to be very courageous to help Jews during this war.

37 Fictional Vs. Historical Account Read both texts: “Going into Hiding” and the excerpt from Number the Stars. Complete the middle column, identifying at least three similarities between the two passages. For each similarity, write a quote that shows the similarity in each text, “Going into Hiding” in the left column and Number the Stars in the right column. See model from Night and “The Murder of Millions” on the next slide.

38 Quote from “Going into Hiding” that shows this similarity. Identify similarities between the two passages. Quote from Number the Stars that shows this similarity. ”Most people were murdered in the gas chambers a few hours after arriving, their bodies then burned in huge incinerators.” Concentration camps used incinerators to burn the bodies of Jews. ”Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those flames? You’re going to be burned.” ”The death camps were all run by the ‘Death’s Head’ S.S., so called for the skull insignia on their caps and their talents for torture and cruelty.” The S.S. was in charge of the process of gathering, torturing, and killing Jews. ”a typical S.S. officer: cruel face, but not devoid of intelligence, and wearing a monocle…” ”Trains from every European country under German occupation went back and forth to Poland carrying Jews crowded together in cattle cars.” Jews were sent to extermination camps in trains. ”The cherished objects we had brought with us thus far were left behind on the train…” ”The Nazis claimed that the Jews were simply being taken to work camps in Poland. Most people believed the lie.” Most people did not know about the camps and/or believed the lies the Nazis told about their purpose. ‘Didn’t you know what was in store for you at Auschwitz? Haven’t you heard about it? In 1944?’ Explain how the two passages are different. In “The Murder of Millions”, the author gives an overview of who and how many people were killed in the concentration camps. Night focuses on the story of one man and his father. Besides just talking about the deaths in concentration camps, it also addresses the separation of families and the religion of this unfortunate people. Which passage did you prefer? Why?

39 Practice ERQ Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars is historical fiction set in the same time period as the article “Going into Hiding”. Compare and/or contrast how the authors depict the historical time period both in the passage Number the Stars and “Going into Hiding.”

40 Figurative Language Literal language: words and phrases that means exactly what they say “Leave this room, please.” Figurative language: words and phrases that create an image or idea beyond what they say “Hit the road, Jack.” Listen to “Wordplay” Flocabulary:“Wordplay” language/ Complete Figurative Language Notes

41 Figurative Language Figurative language that uses comparison to make a point: Metaphor, simile, juxtaposition, hyperbole, allusion, personification, irony, pun Figurative language that uses sound to make more memorable or musical: Alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia Review each example and determine the type of figurative language. Briefly explain the meaning or purpose of each example of figurative language.

42 Analyzing Poetry To analyze poetry is to break it down into parts (figurative language, point of view, structure, and tone) to better understand it and find the theme. Review Analyzing Poetry GlogsterAnalyzing Poetry Glogster Complete poetry analysis annotation with model of “The Times”. Students complete poetry analysis annotation in pairs for “The Song of the Dying Gunner”.

43 1944: The war from a soldier’s perspective “The Times” by Charles Madge Analyze how the war affected soldiers in this poem. Support your answer with a specific quote one of the poems. Explain how the quote supports your answer. “The Song of the Dying Gunner” by Charles Causley Analyze how the war affected soldiers in this poem. Support your answer with a specific quote one of the poems. Explain how the quote supports your answer.

44 1945: Allies liberate the concentration camps I Have Lived a Thousand Years by Livia Bitton-Jackson Explain how each part of a diary’s structure helps the reader better understand this type of text. Use specific examples from Livia’s story. Date, location Frequent (sometimes daily) entries First person point of view “Day by Day” from A History of US: War, Peace, and All That Jazz Explain how Germany and Japan affected the world through the war. Explain how Germany and Japan were affected as result of the war.

45 Literary & Informational Texts Literary Texts Point of view? Personal, first person perspective Text Structure? Story plot Diary/Memoir Poetic Style of writing? Emotional Purpose? Teach themes about life Informational Texts Point of view? Historical, third person perspective Text Structure? Chronological Cause and Effect Comparison/contrast Style of writing? Matter of fact Purpose? Teach facts about history

46 Holocaust Texts: Sort the following into Literary or Info 1.“Twentieth Century Monsters” from A History of US: War, Peace, and All That Jazz 2.“The Ghettos” from A Teacher’s Guide to the Holocaust 3.Daniel’s Story by Carol Matas 4.Milkweed by Jerry Spinelli 5.“Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat” by Winston Churchill 6.“Declaration of War on Japan” by Franklin Roosevelt 7.“The Murder of Millions” from Anne Frank: Beyond the Diary” 8.Night by Elie Wiesel 9.“Going into Hiding” from Anne Frank: Beyond the Diary” 10.Number the Stars by Lois Lowry 11.The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 12.Poems from War and the Pity of War 13.I Have Lived a Thousand Years by Livia Bitton-Jackson 14.“Day by Day” from A History of US: War, Peace, and All That Jazz

47 Literary & Informational Texts Literary Texts 1.Daniel’s Story by Carol Matas 2.Milkweed by Jerry Spinelli 3.Number the Stars by Lois Lowry 4.The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 5.Night by Elie Wiesel 6.I Have Lived a Thousand Years by Livia Bitton- Jackson 7.Poems from War and the Pity of War Informational Texts 1.“Twentieth Century Monsters” from A History of US: War, Peace, and All That Jazz 2.“The Ghettos” from A Teacher’s Guide to the Holocaust 3.“Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat” by Winston Churchill 4.“Declaration of War on Japan” by Franklin Roosevelt 5.“The Murder of Millions” from Anne Frank: Beyond the Diary” 6.“Going into Hiding” from Anne Frank: Beyond the Diary” 7.“Day by Day” from A History of US: War, Peace, and All That Jazz


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