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Innovative Employment Models. Seven Case Studies Job Development Focus Professional Career Advising Matching Grant Incentives Resources, Education, Collaboration.

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Presentation on theme: "Innovative Employment Models. Seven Case Studies Job Development Focus Professional Career Advising Matching Grant Incentives Resources, Education, Collaboration."— Presentation transcript:

1 Innovative Employment Models

2 Seven Case Studies Job Development Focus Professional Career Advising Matching Grant Incentives Resources, Education, Collaboration Hospitality Training Food Industry & Education Training (FIET) Skills Training Project

3 Case Study Caritas of Austin Job Development Focus One staff member to focus on job development Works closely with rest of employment team Can be dedicated to one agency or as a resource to all agencies Most successful job developers have a background in human resources, staffing/recruiting, and/or business

4 Pros Cons Time to focus on identifying job leads Specific skills that help in business communication Attention to follow-up and sustaining employer relationships Difficult to track if a specific job lead results in successful placement Communication with employment specialists/case managers can be difficult Inconsistency in employer approach Case Study Caritas of Austin

5 Case Study Catholic Charities of San Diego Professional Career Advising One staff member dedicated to career counseling, coaching, and/or job placement specifically for refugees with professional backgrounds Can be used as an incentive after first job is secured

6 Pros Cons Personal attention towards each case Can pursue specific entry- level jobs that are an opening into a career Counseling available regarding recertification process Limited resources available Expectations of job seeker Difficult to find entry-level jobs for all professions Case Study Catholic Charities of San Diego

7 Case Study Jewish Vocational Services of Kansas City Matching Grant Incentives Unused MG funds may help clients at the 120 and 180 day marks Bonus structure provides motivation for early employment If bonuses are paid at the 120 and 180 day marks clients gain both work experience and cash

8 Matching Grant Incentives Employed One Month After Enrollment First MG month starts from the day of enrollment and finishes on clients’ 60th day after arrival If employed during the first month: Clients receive a $500 bonus Rent for following month (if not covered by R&P) Clients will receive Cash Allowance until first pay check Clients receive bonus on the 120 day Case Study Jewish Vocational Services of Kansas City

9 Matching Grant Incentives Employed Two Months After Enrollment If employed during the second month: Clients receive a $250 bonus Rent for following month (if not covered by R&P) Clients receive bonus on the 120 day Case Study Jewish Vocational Services of Kansas City

10 Matching Grant Incentives Employed Three Months After Enrollment If employed during the third month: Clients receive a $125 bonus Rent for following month (if not covered by R&P) Clients receive bonus on the 120 day Case Study Jewish Vocational Services of Kansas City

11 Pros Cons Many clients use bonuses for down payments on cars or recertification Bonus structure has created incentive in the Kansas City refugee program Flexibility of MG provides opportunity for practitioners Although the bonus structure motivates many, clients with unrealistic salary expectations may still be unwilling to accept a job before the 120 th day Case Study Jewish Vocational Services of Kansas City

12 Case Study JF&CS of Pittsburgh Resources, Education, and Collaboration Job development starts in the third month after arrival ESL and job readiness classes are the first priority Refugee community groups are leveraged Mentoring programs provide opportunities to build resources for future arrivals With employers, transparency has been the key. Stats are used a marketing tool

13 Pros Cons 180 Placement rate 100% 180 Retention rate 100% Other program rates, 88%, 92%, and 95% Clients are better prepared to interview for jobs and enter the workforce successfully Economy in Pittsburgh is strong but if it weakens, 120 day placement rates could suffer Case Study JF&CS of Pittsburgh

14 Case Study LSSNEF- Jacksonville Jacksonville Hospitality Training Pilot Stage Curriculum includes hands-on learning and English language training 6 week program; 3 classes so far 32 out of 42 participants employed at the end of training

15 Case Study LSSNEF- Jacksonville Jacksonville Hospitality Training

16 Pros Cons Supports the development of community within participants Builds confidence of participants Develops a routine schedule for newcomers Strengthens relationships within business community Centered on needs of participants Provides employment opportunities right away Funding -Inconsistent training schedule -Requires staff time to oversee but no funding for full-time position Entry-level hospitality positions are not a fit for every job seeker Case Study LSSNEF- Jacksonville

17 Case Study LSSNEF- Jacksonville First Graduating Class, March 2010

18 Case Study Caritas of Austin Food Industry and Education Training (FIET) Created in January hours classroom instruction 1-2 week internship Leads to Texas Food Handler’s Permit 4-5 students at a time, 50 students trained so far 70% employed after completing training

19 Pros Cons Case Study Caritas of Austin Small class size Picture-based curriculum Increased competitiveness for job seekers Trainer used to own a restaurant Difficult for LEP non-Spanish speakers to get hired New hires tend to be from existing employees’ referrals Some participants “don’t take training seriously”

20 Case Study Fargo, ND Skills Training Project Started in 2002 Collaboration with state refugee program and Lutheran Social Services 80 hours Specifically for LEP job seekers Focus on workplace vocabulary, safety, math, and 8 hours of Achieve Global curriculum

21 Case Study Fargo, ND Skills Training Program

22 Pros Cons Case Study Fargo, ND Closely aligned with industry needs Participants tend to get hired AT graduation Business recognize value of training Increased competitiveness for job seekers who complete program Limited training dates Limited slots for participants Commitment to complete training Cost -- $1,600 – can be paid for using TAP or MG training dollars

23 Top Ten Issues to Consider 1.Choose a training that is reflective of local employer needs so that trainees are competitive for available jobs. 2.Adapt training methods to the needs of training participants. 3.Find a partner who can offer on-site experience. 4. Identify ONE staff person who acts as liaison to training activities and community. 5.Convene at least one advisory meeting made up of stakeholders to introduce the idea, identify challenges, and leverage their resources and connections.

24 Top Ten Things to Consider 6.Do your research for a suitable training partner. 7.Use a pilot stage to test your idea and modify it based on your experience. 8.Provide simple supports for training like pencils, calendar, clothing and equipment. 9.Build in ESL component. 10.Recruit training participants after R&P period to minimize disruptions. Do careful screening to ensure training matches needs and interests of participants.


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