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The Other Change Management Process: A Composite Best Practices Approach to Organizational Change Management William L. Cunningham, PMP

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Presentation on theme: "The Other Change Management Process: A Composite Best Practices Approach to Organizational Change Management William L. Cunningham, PMP"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Other Change Management Process: A Composite Best Practices Approach to Organizational Change Management William L. Cunningham, PMP

2 Copyright William L. Cunningham, PMP. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the authors. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.

3 This file was produced to accompany a presentation on ‘Organizational Change Management ’ for the March 25, 2010 itSMF USA online conference- “All Aboard! Managing Organizational Change Your ITSM Implementation Matures” If you are reading the presentation– there are notes below many of the slides that will further explain their content.

4 Contact: Presentation with notes available at

5 Agenda Anticipate resistance and respond to barriers: – A structured approach to Managing Organizational Change – Composite Case Study of applying the model to an ITSM initiative – What key roles & resources do you need? Questions

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7 Deming or Shewhart Cycle Process Management implies constant change

8 ITIL v3 Service Lifecycle ITIL implies constant change

9 ITIL Adoption will Include Change

10 Reasons for Failure of Organizational Change Initiatives Difficulty changing the culture of the organization Lack of staff commitment and understanding Lack of education, communication and training Responsibility without sufficient authority Lack of effective ‘Champions’ Loss of momentum after opening hype Lack of funding Source – Pink Elephant (mostly)

11 Reasons for Failure of Organizational Change Initiatives Lack of quantifiable long term benefits (ROI) Lack of organizational learning (lessons learned – lack of iterative culture) Satisfaction with status quo Over-focus on tactical, isolated solutions rather than a strategic solution Trying to do everything at once – over ambitious Source – Pink Elephant (mostly)

12 Reasons for Failure of Organizational Change Initiatives No accountability; lack of clear ownership Tools unable to support processes People not skilled enough to support processes No structured Project Management Source – Pink Elephant (mostly)

13 ITIL Adoption will Include Change Serious organizational change takes 3-5 years – This does not mean you can’t have quick wins You must be prepared for resistance to any significant organizational change. You must also understand that change adoption is not likely to be linear.

14 ITSM/ITIL Entails Organizational Change New roles: Process owners, change advisory board Moving from hierarchy to matrix Standardization Managing to metrics instead of anecdotes New steps, new accountabilities New tools 14

15 ITIL Entails Organizational Change Replacing and consolidating current tools – Incident tracking – Automating existing functions – Forms – Phone calls – ‘We just know…’ New tools for new functions – CMDB – Discovery tools – Service level management 15

16 ITSM/ITIL Entails Organizational Change Your organization will become more of a matrix and less hierarchical Process teams that come from all across the organization Process owners and functional owners may compete for authority and power If you’ve already introduced project management discipline in your organization, you may have an easier time 16

17 Peter M. Senge – The Five Disciplines (towards building a Learning Organization) 1. Personal Mastery 2. Mental Models 3. Shared Vision 4. Team Learning 5. Systems Thinking 17

18 Composite Organizational Change Model for the Learning Organization 18 Individual- Psychological Organizational

19 Necessary Conditions for Successful Change: 1.Leadership for the Change 2.Capabilities that are weaved into the fabric of the organization 19 -John Kotter Leading Change

20 Implementing Process: Managing Change Eight Stages of Leading Change, John Kotter 1.Create Sense of Urgency 2.Create Guiding Coalition 3.Develop a Change Vision & Strategy 4.Communicate the Change Vision 20

21 Still Managing Change Kotter’s 8-Stage Process continued: 5.Empower Broad-based Action 6.Generate Short-term Wins 7.Consolidate Gains and Produce more Wins 8.Anchor New Approaches in the Culture 21

22 Implementing Change- Communicating the Vision through Anchoring ADKAR Model: ‘Managing the People Side’ to embed Changes in the culture: A: Awareness of need for Change (Communications) D: Desire to participate in and support the Change K: Knowledge on how to change (Education) 22 -Prosci –

23 Implementing Change- Communicating the Vision through Anchoring ADKAR Model: ‘Managing the People Side’ to embed Changes in the culture: A: Ability to implement required skills and behaviors (Training) R: Reinforcement to sustain the change 23 -Prosci –

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26 The Model Applied – Change Trigger to 1. Sense of Urgency From current Shared Vision – where is the organization falling short? What are the ‘pain points?’ Have there been triggers? Specific occurrences leading to a consideration of change?

27 Examples: – Organizational merger results in a larger organization – suddenly one doesn’t ‘know everyone’  drives a move to process (paradox of best practices) – High visibility Changes fail - leading management to consider alternatives – Poorly designed ticketing system leading to increased and non-standard Service Desk responses The Model Applied – Change Trigger to 1. Sense of Urgency

28 Examples: – Benchmarking against competing organizations – Benchmarking against best practices (the ‘Gartner call’) The Model Applied – Change Trigger to 1. Sense of Urgency

29 The Model Applied – 2. Create the Guiding Coalition Ideally a broad-based team – Enough power to lead the change – Enough knowledge to lead the change Process Experts ITSM Experts Project Management Functional Managers Executive sponsor

30 Generic Improvement Model – Steps for the Guiding Coalition as they 3. Develop the Vision and Strategy 1. Analysis -- Where are We now? 2. Goals & Objective – Where do we want to be? 3. Plans– How do we get there 4. Measurement & Tracking – Are we there yet? 30

31 Generic Improvement Model – Steps for the Guiding Coalition as they 3. Develop the Vision and Strategy Analysis – Where are we now? – Suggest widening the Guiding Coalition at this iteration – Include line staff- those who best know existing process – Include them in detail definition 31

32 Generic Improvement Model – Steps for the Guiding Coalition as they 3. Develop the Vision and Strategy Suggest using Project Management Methodology – Define the goals of the projects (charter) – Clearly define the scope of the project (charter) – Define a reasonable project schedule to track progress 32

33 Generic Improvement Model – Steps for the Guiding Coalition as they 3. Develop the Vision and Strategy Caution- Beware Scope Creep – Recharter your Program if necessary As Knowledge is gained- the Vision may change as well Failure to recharter may shortchange the end of the program 33

34 Generic Improvement Model – Steps for the Guiding Coalition as they 3. Develop the Vision and Strategy Example – Widening the Guiding Coalition (Gain a Head Start on Building Awareness and Desire) – Committees to analyze SOPs – Teams to Analyze Existing Processes 34

35 Generic Improvement Model – 4. Communicate the Vision (Awareness and Desire) This is a continuous step – it should begin as soon as the Vision is clear You are seeking to build: – Awareness of the need for change – Desire to participate in and support the change 35

36 Generic Improvement Model – 4. Communicate the Vision (Awareness and Desire) Kotter suggests that it impossible to overcommunicate – Use a variety of methods to communicate. – Include the commitment- the change is NOT an option (you can’t wait it out) 36

37 Generic Improvement Model – 4. Communicate the Vision (Awareness and Desire) Examples: – Participation on Process and SOP Design Teams – High Level Concepts Workshops First for Senior Managers Followed by Line Staff – Posters – Newsletter column – Staff Meetings 37

38 Generic Improvement Model – 5. Empower Broad Based Action 38 Charter the Individual Projects Provide Funding Analysis Teams move to (re)Design Committee to design SOPs for Service Requests Process Design Teams for Incident, Problem and Change Vendor Selection

39 Generic Improvement Model – 6. Generate Short Term Wins 39 This is where Knowledge and Ability are applied Examples: CAB Major Incident Process and Problem Management SOPs for Service Requests

40 Generic Improvement Model – 7. Consolidating Gains 40 CAB  Formalized Change Management Tool to document ALL Changes Definition of Standard, Normal, CAB Changes Incident Management  Common Process Formal Problem Management ITSM Tools… CSI - Committees to refine processes

41 Generic Improvement Model – 8. Anchor New Approaches (Reinforcement) 41 Change Adoption and Execution is NOT likely to be linear Have plans to Reinforce the Change Resist the temptation to declare victory too early

42 J

43 J Initial level of happiness and productivity. Trough of despair The J-Curve of Change

44 Questions? Contact: Presentation with notes available at


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