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Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Sponsorship and the Sponsor Assessment Diagram Please read Right to use this content is governed by the.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Sponsorship and the Sponsor Assessment Diagram Please read Right to use this content is governed by the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Sponsorship and the Sponsor Assessment Diagram Please read Right to use this content is governed by the licensing terms and conditions for this online tool. Reproduction and distribution are not permitted under a single-user license without express permission from Prosci. For permission to reproduce or distribute content, contact Prosci at +1 970-203-9332. All trademarks and copyright notices must be retained. Please read Right to use this content is governed by the licensing terms and conditions for this online tool. Reproduction and distribution are not permitted under a single-user license without express permission from Prosci. For permission to reproduce or distribute content, contact Prosci at +1 970-203-9332. All trademarks and copyright notices must be retained.

2 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Agenda Why sponsors are important Sponsor roles Sponsor mistakes Sponsor Assessment Diagram 2

3 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Why are sponsors so important? In each of Prosci’s eight benchmarking studies, participants identified the # 1 contributor to success: 1998: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2000: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2003: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2005: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2011: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2007: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2009: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 2013: #1 contributor – Active and visible sponsorship 3

4 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Authority and Credibility Employees look to senior leaders for messages (both spoken and unspoken) about the project’s importance and the organization’s commitment to the change 4

5 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. 3 Primary Roles of Sponsors Participate actively and visibly throughout the project Build a coalition of sponsorship and manage resistance Communicate directly with employees * From Prosci’s 2014 Best Practices in Change Management benchmarking report p. 112 5

6 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Participate actively and visibly Sponsorship is more than signing the check and “kicking the initiative out the door” Examples include:  Set expectations and establish clear objectives for the project  Hold the team accountable for results  Attend frequent project review meetings and actively review progress 6

7 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. 2. Build a coalition The coalition is not just an organizational chart The coalition is based on ‘who is being impacted’ Bottom’s up approach! 7

8 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. 3. Communicate directly Participants identified senior business leaders as the preferred senders of messages about the business reasons for the change 8

9 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Do sponsors understand their role? According to study data, 58% of sponsors did not have an adequate understanding of their role! 9

10 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Biggest sponsor mistakes 1.Failed to remain visible and engaged throughout the project 2.Failed to demonstrate support for the project in words and actions * From the 2014 Best Practices in Change Management benchmarking report “Was involved only at the beginning – announced the change and then walked away.” “Did not actively participate.” “Assumed the change was obvious, rational and logical, and therefore did not require any direct support.” “Did not empower the team” 10

11 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Biggest sponsor mistakes 3.Failed to effectively communicate messages about the need for change 4.Ignored the people side of change 5.Delegated or abdicated the sponsorship role and responsibilities “Did not articulate the change or the business benefits.” “Assumed the initiative will sell itself because it’s a good solution.” “Delegated the leadership/sponsorship to a subordinate or the project manager.” * From the 2014 Best Practices in Change Management benchmarking report 11

12 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Where are sponsors involved? Communication plan Sponsor roadmap Coaching plan Training plan Resistance management plan A project or change management team member can develop the plans, but senior leaders must carry out the activities of sponsorship 12

13 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Current state Transition state Future state Why sponsors struggle with ‘managing change’ 1.They don’t understand their role Benchmarking data suggests less than half have a good understanding of their role in leading change 2.They think they can tell people to just change 3.They live in the future state Most change management challenges are tied to the current state 13

14 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Developing a Sponsor Assessment Diagram This chart will be a strong predictor of success or failure for your change. 14

15 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 1. Identify Impacted Groups Examples: Logistics Sales Manufacturing Finance 15 Note: Should already be completed from your work on the Prosci ® Impact Index.

16 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Sales Region 2 Primary Sponsor LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1 Step 2. Draw a Sponsor Assessment Diagram Add the impacted groups at the bottom of the diagram. You will be creating this diagram from the bottom looking upward into the organization. 16

17 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Primary Sponsor D.C.T.L.W.R.B.U.C.H. e.g., Director of Logistics e.g., Vice President of Sales Sales Region 2 LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1 17 Step 2. Draw a Sponsor Assessment Diagram For each impacted group, add the person that this group of employees would view as “in charge” of their area.

18 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Using the formal reporting structure, add all managers between these sponsors and the primary sponsor (or up to a management level equal to the primary sponsor). 18 Primary Sponsor S.P.M.B. A.B.G.F. E.G. ITE.T. U.W. D.C. P.O. T.L.W.R.B.U.C.H. Sales Region 2 LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1 Step 2. Draw a Sponsor Assessment Diagram

19 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 2. Draw a Sponsor Assessment Diagram Show the relationship between the primary sponsor and any peers at the highest level. This resulting diagram is the sponsorship group that you will assess in Step 3. 19 Primary Sponsor S.P.M.B. A.B.G.F. E.G. I.T.E.T. U.W. D.C. P.O. T.L.W.R.B.U.C.H. COO Sales Region 2 LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1

20 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 3. Determine Position of Sponsors and Key Managers Relative to the Change Assess the position of each manager relative to this change. –Openly support the change = A –Openly oppose the change or are neutral = B If unsure about a manager’s position on this change, check with your primary sponsor or someone close to this person (or ask him or her directly). 20

21 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 4. Determine CM Competency Level of Each Person on the Sponsor Assessment Diagram Assess the sponsorship competency of each manager in the Sponsor Assessment Diagram (Level 1, 2 or 3) Use the Sponsor Competency Assessment for assessing general sponsorship behaviors In-class exercise: complete this assessment (pages 4-55 through 4-57) for one of your project sponsors 21 (Go to pages 4-55 to 4-57) Level 1 = High level of sponsor competency (80 – 100) Level 2 = Moderate level of sponsor competency (70 – 79) Level 3 = Low level of sponsor competency (< 70) Complete individually in class. In-class activity

22 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. T.J. A1 S.P. A3 M.B. A1 A.B. B2 G.F. A1 E.G. B2 I.T. B1 E.T. A3 U.W. B3 D.C. B3 A.O. A2 T.L. A2 W.R. A3 B.U. B1 C.H. A2 COO A3 Sales Region 2 LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1 Step 5. Enter Alphanumeric Designations on the Sponsor Assessment Diagram 22

23 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 6. Color Code the Sponsor Assessment Diagram 23 A1 B1, B2, B3, A3 A2 Green – supports the change and has demonstrated a high level of sponsor competency. Yellow – supports the change and has demonstrated a moderate level of sponsor competency. Red – opposed to the change or has demonstrated a low level of sponsor competency. Alpha-numeric legend A = Supportive of the change B = Neutral or opposed 1 = High level of sponsor competency (score of 80 – 100) 2 = Moderate level of sponsor competency (score of 70 – 79) 3 = Low level of sponsor competency (score < 70)

24 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 6. Color Code the Sponsor Assessment Diagram 24 T.J. A1 S.P. A3 M.B. A1 A.B. B2 G.F. A1 E.G. B2 I.T. B1 E.T. A3 U.W. B3 D.C. B3 P.O. A2 T.L. A2 W.R. A3 B.U. B1 C.H. A2 COO A3 Sales Region 2 LogisticsMFGFinance Sales Region 1 Primary Sponsor

25 Copyright © 2014 Prosci Inc. All rights reserved. Step 7. Present Your Assessment Results to the Primary Sponsor Maintain confidentiality (avoid embarrassing or surprising a business leader – use this diagram with care!) Gain concurrence from primary sponsor Have a plan ready to address yellows and reds (this should appear in your Sponsor Roadmap) Enlist support of primary sponsor to address the most serious challenges 25


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