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Frequently Used Elements of MLA Style © The Smucker Learning Center The University of Akron – Wayne College Based on the Green Handout from The Smucker.

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Presentation on theme: "Frequently Used Elements of MLA Style © The Smucker Learning Center The University of Akron – Wayne College Based on the Green Handout from The Smucker."— Presentation transcript:

1 Frequently Used Elements of MLA Style © The Smucker Learning Center The University of Akron – Wayne College Based on the Green Handout from The Smucker Learning Center and The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6 th edition.

2 Citing Your Sources Means telling your readers where the information came from Is a courtesy to the original authors Is a courtesy to your readers

3 Not Citing your Sources Is called plagiarism Is a form of dishonesty Can bring severe penalties

4 As You Research Consult the handout or the MLA Handbook to see what info you need Make copies of the article from the journal, magazine, newspaper, etc Write the necessary publication information and page number on the copies

5 When to Cite a Source Always – when you quote directly When the information is not common knowledge Whenever you quote, paraphrase, or summarize an author’s information

6 Cite In-Text Enough information to refer the reader to the Works Cited page Give page numbers or paragraph numbers for quotes

7 Paraphrased Material Author’s name may be gracefully worked into the sentence, with the page or paragraph number within parentheses at the end of the sentence. Example: In his article in Rolling Stone, Jones says that Siskel and Ebert rate Pleasantville as the best movie of 1998 (72).

8 Paraphrased Material – cont. Author’s name may appear with the page or paragraph number within parentheses at the end of the sentence. Example: Siskel and Ebert say Pleasantville is the best movie of 1998 (Jones 72).

9 Gracefully Introducing Quotes Use the author’s last name. Use the word “states.” Or use one of the alternatives to “states” listed on page 4 of the green handout Avoid using the word “feels.”

10 Documenting Quotations Short quotes – up to 4 lines in length Long quotes – more than 4 lines

11 Short Quotes Put quote marks around quoted material Cite the source in parentheses Place the period after the closing parenthesis

12 Short Quotes – Examples Jones states, “Siskel and Ebert think Pleasantville will top the charts” (72). Some are saying, “Pleasantville will win an Academy Award” (Jones 73).

13 Long Quotes Longer than 4 lines In block form Indent the entire quote 10 spaces (1 inch) Do not use quotation marks Double space the block quote Cite the source after the end punctuation of the quote

14 Long Quote – Example At the conclusion of Lord of the Flies, Golding has Ralph and the other boys realize the horror of their actions: The tears began to flow and sobs shook him. He gave himself up to them now for the first time on the island; great shuddering spasms of grief that seemed to wrench his whole body. His voice rose under the black smoke before the burning wreckage of the island; and infected by that emotion, the other little boys began to shake and sob too. (186)

15 The Works Cited Page Center the words Works Cited at the top – no quotes, italics, or underline. Arrange sources alphabetically, beginning with author’s last name. If no author is given, begin the entry with the title and alphabetize without counting a, an, or the. Do not justify the right margin.

16 Works Cited Gilbert, Sandra M. Emily’s Bread: Poems. New York: Norton, Ghost Volcano: Poems. New York: Norton, Johnson, George J. “A Distinctive Model of Serial Learning.” Psychological Review 98.1 (1991): Lukacs, John. “The End of the Twentieth Century.” Harper’s Jan. 1993: Pipher, Mary. “Saplings in the Storm.” Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric and Reader. Ed. Gary Goshgarian, Kathleen Krueger, and Janet Barnett Minc. 4 th ed. New York: Longman, “Reading Between the Lines.” New Yorker 24 May 1993: Segal, Gabriel. “Seeing What Is Not There.” Philosophical Review 98 (1989):

17 Each Entry Begins with a Hanging Indent Put cursor on the first line of the entry Click FORMAT PARAGRAPH INDENT & SPACING SPECIAL HANGING OK

18 Each Individual Entry Is Double Spaced Within the entry Between entries Do not put extra spaces between entries.

19 Works Cited Gilbert, Sandra M. Emily’s Bread: Poems. New York: Norton, Ghost Volcano: Poems. New York: Norton, Johnson, George J. “A Distinctive Model of Serial Learning.” Psychological Review 98.1 (1991): Lukacs, John. “The End of the Twentieth Century.” Harper’s Jan. 1993: Pipher, Mary. “Saplings in the Storm.” Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric and Reader. Ed. Gary Goshgarian, Kathleen Krueger, and Janet Barnett Minc. 4 th ed. New York: Longman, “Reading Between the Lines.” New Yorker 24 May 1993: Segal, Gabriel. “Seeing What Is Not There.” Philosophical Review 98 (1989):

20 Some Common Forms Book Magazine Journal Newspaper

21 Book Author’s name, last name first. Use full first name or initials, depending upon the author’s preference. Title of book underlined, followed by a period. Place of publication, followed by a colon. Publisher, followed by a comma. Year of publication, followed by a period.

22 Book - Example Borroff, Marie. Language and the Past: Verbal Artistry in Frost, Stevens, and Moore. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1979.

23 Book - continued If an author has more than one work cited, after the first entry, instead of the author’s name, type three hyphens, followed by a period and the title. Alphabetize the entries by the title of the work. Example: Borroff, Marie. Language and the Past: Verbal Artistry in Frost, Stevens, and Moore. Chicago: U of Chicago P, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: A New Verse Translation. New York: Norton, Wallace Stevens: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice, 1963.

24 Works Cited Gilbert, Sandra M. Emily’s Bread: Poems. New York: Norton, Ghost Volcano: Poems. New York: Norton, Johnson, George J. “A Distinctive Model of Serial Learning.” Psychological Review 98.1 (1991): Lukacs, John. “The End of the Twentieth Century.” Harper’s Jan. 1993: Pipher, Mary. “Saplings in the Storm.” Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric and Reader. Ed. Gary Goshgarian, Kathleen Krueger, and Janet Barnett Minc. 4 th ed. New York: Longman, “Reading Between the Lines.” New Yorker 24 May 1993: Segal, Gabriel. “Seeing What Is Not There.” Philosophical Review 98 (1989):

25 Magazine Name of author, last name first, followed by a period Title of article, in quotation marks, followed by a period inside the quotation marks Title of magazine or journal, underlined Date, followed by a colon Page numbers for the entire article, followed by a period

26 Magazine - Example Lukacs, John, “The End of the Twentieth Centruy.” Harper’s Jan. 1993:

27 Journal Article Author’s last name, first name, period Title of article within quotation marks, period Title of journal underlined Volume number If each issue begins with page # 1, include the issue number after volume number, separated from volume by a period. Year in parentheses, followed by a colon Page numbers for the entire article, period

28 Journal – Example A Segal, Gabriel. “Seeing What Is Not There.” Philosophical Review 98 (1989):

29 Journal – Example B Johnson, George J. “A Distinctive Model of Serial Learning.” Psychological Review 98.2 (1991):

30 Newspaper Article Author’s last name, first name, if given, period Title of article in quotation marks followed by period inside the quotation marks IF the article is an editorial, add the word Editorial after the title, followed by a period. Name of newspaper, underlined Day, month, year, followed by a colon Section and page number followed by a period (If the article is on more than one page, add a plus sign.) End the entry with a period.

31 Newspaper – Example Sun, Lena. “Chinese Feel the Strain of a New Society.” Editorial. Washington Post 13 June 1993: A1+.

32 When in Doubt – Check it Out! MLA handout – the green one MLA Handbook, 6th edition Learning Center Writing Consultant Other Smucker Learning Center documentation handouts: MLA Frequently Asked Questions:

33 Thank You!  The Smucker Learning Center The University of Akron Wayne College


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