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Homer, The Iliad “Sing, o goddess, the anger of Achilles that brought countless ills upon the Acheans” trans. Samuel Butler (1874) “Let us begin,

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Presentation on theme: "Homer, The Iliad “Sing, o goddess, the anger of Achilles that brought countless ills upon the Acheans” trans. Samuel Butler (1874) “Let us begin,"— Presentation transcript:

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5 Homer, The Iliad “Sing, o goddess, the anger of Achilles that brought countless ills upon the Acheans” trans. Samuel Butler (1874) “Let us begin, goddess of song, with the angry parting that took place between Agamemnon King of Men and the great Achilles son of Peleus.” trans. E.V. Rieu (1950)

6 Herodotus, History The First Book, Entitled Clio “These are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, which he publishes, in the hope of thereby preserving from decay the remembrances of what men have done.” Trans. George Rawlinson (1858)

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8 “Even before the advent of the Black Death ( ), population expansion had ceased, serious and widespread famines had reappeared, and the European economy had begun to slide into a financial crisis and a depression that was to last until the latter part of the fifteenth century and even, in some sectors, into the sixteenth.” Francis Oakely, The Medieval Experience, p. 41

9 “Even before the advent of the Black Death ( ), population expansion had ceased, serious and widespread famines had reappeared, and the European economy had begun to slide into a financial crisis and a depression that was to last until the latter part of the fifteenth century and even, in some sectors, into the sixteenth.” Francis Oakely, The Medieval Experience, p. 41

10 “A comparison of the values of 1346 with those of 1382 and 1383 of those manors that were kept in hand shows a decline in each case: Alciston had declined by 24 to 43 percent; Lullington by about 40 percent; Westfield by 41 to 85 percent, Iklesham by between 44 and 63 percent; Wye by about 80 percent; Dengenmarsh by between 20 and 41 percent, Barnhorn by between 20 and 30 percent; and Bronham by nearly 25 percent.” Eleanor Searle, Lordship and Community. Battle Abbey and its Banlieu , p. 258

11 “A comparison of the values of 1346 with those of 1382 and 1383 of those manors that were kept in hand shows a decline in each case: Alciston had declined by 24 to 43 percent; Lullington by about 40 percent; Westfield by 41 to 85 percent, Iklesham by between 44 and 63 percent; Wye by about 80 percent; Dengenmarsh by between 20 and 41 percent, Barnhorn by between 20 and 30 percent; and Bronham by nearly 25 percent.” Eleanor Searle, Lordship and Community. Battle Abbey and its Banlieu , p. 258

12 “As histories of excluded bodies, the bodies that made national Englishness possible, this counterpastoral challenged the politics of visibility that made the very modern English models of nature, society, and the individual visible through the invisibility of bodies that did not matter.” Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (1998), p. 64

13 “As histories of excluded bodies, the bodies that made national Englishness possible, this counterpastoral challenged the politics of visibility that made the very modern English models of nature, society, and the individual visible through the invisibility of bodies that did not matter.” Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (1998), p. 64

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