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Chapter 15, Section Chapter 15 The First Global Age: Europe and Asia (1415–1796) Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall,

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 15, Section Chapter 15 The First Global Age: Europe and Asia (1415–1796) Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 15, Section Chapter 15 The First Global Age: Europe and Asia (1415–1796) Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. World History: Connection to Today

2 Chapter 15, Section Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. Chapter 15: The First Global Age: Europe and Asia (1415–1796) Section 4: Encounters in East Asia World History: Connection to Today

3 Chapter 15, Section Encounters in East Asia How was European trade with China affected by the Manchu conquest? What factors led Korea to isolate itself from other nations? What attitude did the Tokugawa shoguns have toward foreign traders? 4

4 Chapter 15, Section European Trade With China The Europeans who reached Asia in the 1500s were very impressed by what they saw. The Chinese, however, saw the Europeans as “southern barbarians,” lacking civilized ways. The Ming dynasty had ended overseas exploration in the mid-1400s. Portuguese traders reached China by sea in The Ming eventually allowed them a trading post at Macao. Because they were uninterested in European trading products, the Ming demanded payment for Chinese goods in gold or silver. After the Manchus conquered China, the Manchu Qing dynasty maintained the Ming policy of restricting foreign trade. The Europeans continued to press to expand trade to other areas of China. 4

5 Chapter 15, Section Korea and Isolation Several events led Korea to turn inward for a period of about 250 years. As in China, the low status of merchants in Confucianism led Koreans to look down on foreign trade. In the 1590s, a Japanese invasion devastated the land of Korea. In 1636, the Manchus conquered Korea before overrunning China. Korea was forced to become a tributary state to the Manchu’s Qing dynasty. 4

6 Chapter 15, Section Japan and Foreign Traders The Japanese at first welcomed western traders. They acquired western firearms and built castles modeled on the European design. The Tokugawa shoguns grew increasingly hostile toward foreigners. They saw the foreigners as agents of an invading force. They suspected that the many Japanese Christians were loyal to the pope, rather than to Japanese leaders. They disliked the competition among Christian missionaries. By 1638, the Tokugawas had barred all western merchants and forbidden Japanese to travel abroad. They also ended foreign trade. 4

7 Chapter 15, Section Section 4 Assessment What policy did the Qing adopt regarding foreign trade? a) They gave unlimited trading rights to the Portuguese. b) They maintained the Ming policy of restricting foreign trade. c) They maintained the Ming policy of allowing unlimited trade with Europe. d) They limited foreign trade even more than the Ming had. Which of the following was not an action taken by the Tokugawas in 1638? a) They banned all western merchants. b) They forbid Japanese to travel abroad. c) They ended foreign trade. d) They agreed to continue limited trading with the Spanish. Want to connect to the World History link for this section? Click Here. Click Here. 4

8 Chapter 15, Section 4 Section 4 Assessment What policy did the Qing adopt regarding foreign trade? a) They gave unlimited trading rights to the Portuguese. b) They maintained the Ming policy of restricting foreign trade. c) They maintained the Ming policy of allowing unlimited trade with Europe. d) They limited foreign trade even more than the Ming had. Which of the following was not an action taken by the Tokugawas in 1638? a) They banned all western merchants. b) They forbid Japanese to travel abroad. c) They ended foreign trade. d) They agreed to continue limited trading with the Spanish. Want to connect to the World History link for this section? Click Here. Click Here.


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