Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Mentoring in the Pathology Department John A. Baci, MBA, C-PM Pathology Director, Boston Children’s Hospital 2014 West, Midwest & Canada Regional APC/PDAS.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Mentoring in the Pathology Department John A. Baci, MBA, C-PM Pathology Director, Boston Children’s Hospital 2014 West, Midwest & Canada Regional APC/PDAS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mentoring in the Pathology Department John A. Baci, MBA, C-PM Pathology Director, Boston Children’s Hospital 2014 West, Midwest & Canada Regional APC/PDAS Meeting Grand Hyatt Kauai October 21-24, 2014 l

2 Definition and History men·tor Someone who teaches or gives help and advice to a less experienced and often younger person. A trusted counselor or guide. From Greek mythology: In his old age, Mentor was a friend of Odysseus who placed Mentor in charge of his son Telemachus, and of Odysseus' palace, when Odysseus left for the Trojan War. Because of Mentor's relationship with Telemachus, the personal name Mentor has been adopted in English as a term meaning someone who imparts wisdom to and shares knowledge with a less experienced colleague. Adapted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, (Redirected from Mentor (Greek mythology)Mentor (Greek mythology)

3 External Pathology Recruitment and Retention Challenges Future demand > supply for Pathologists. Decrease in many medical technology training programs. Increasing competition among hospitals and laboratories for pathologists, fellows, residents and technicians. The Millennials in the workforce today will be the Chairmen, Directors, Administrators and Supervisors of tomorrow.

4 We are not growing… Anatomic/Clinical Pathology About 15,000 Pathologists (under 11,000 in patient care) Source: Association of American Medical Colleges 2012 Physician Specialty Data Book November 2012

5 In fact, we are shrinking… Source: Association of American Medical Colleges 2012 Physician Specialty Data Book November 2012 Anatomic Pathology Down 7.4% over the past 10 years

6 Medical Technology Training Programs are Decreasing

7 More Industry Information…..as of 2014 There are only 38 accredited histology HT(ASCP) programs in the U.S. There are only 9 PA(ASCP) programs. 57% of our pathologists are 55 years old or older. 31% graduated from foreign medical school

8 ‘Optimal’ Residency Programs…Then vs. Now 2000: Residency training provides adequate time for clinical practice, boards, and post-residency practice. Graduated responsibilities based upon the level of training. Didactic teaching covering a wide variety of areas. Active teaching in all settings. Protected time allotted for various clinical services. Today: All of the above, plus… Equitable work/life balance. High quality of faculty. Positive house staff morale. Social and recreational opportunities in the local area.

9 Internal Pathology Recruitment and Retention Challenges Inconsistent and/or weak support from Human Resources. Chairman, Division Directors, Administrators, Residency Program Directors and/or Supervisors may vary in regards to recruitment and/or retention experience. Often more difficult to replace technical staff than house staff. Recent cuts in reimbursements have had significant impact on technical and administrative support. Fellows and residents are often supporting hospital operations due to reductions in technical and administrative staff. Inadequate succession planning in all areas of the Pathology Department. ‘Soft skills’ are rarely part of any staff or department development program. In short…it is very easy to slip deeper and deeper into our own roles, while simultaneously ignoring the importance of developing others.

10 From: Mentoring Millennials, Jeanne C. Meister and Karie Willyerd, Harvard Business Review Magazine, May 2010

11 Types of Mentoring [JB] Direct Mentoring Reverse Mentoring Group Mentoring Anonymous Mentoring

12 Direct Mentoring Classic one-on-one relationship. Typically an older experienced mentor paired with a younger less experienced mentee. Formal (part of an institution/employer/medical school mentoring program). Informal or voluntary. Many different types, names, styles (Peer, Cross-Age, Power Mentoring, etc).

13 Reverse Mentoring Original idea came from legendary GE CEO, Jack Welch, who established this type of mentoring to teach senior executives about the internet. Exchange-style mentoring where older employees can modernize themselves by learning more about current technology and workforce trends (ex. apps, social media). Found to also reduce turnover of the younger employees.

14 Group Mentoring Usually led by a senior employee, MD, administrator, etc. Defined target mentee audience. Typically follows a standard format such as a routine meeting, conference call and/or lecture. Less resource-intensive. Less direct individual mentee impact.

15 Anonymous Mentoring Involves advanced background review or research to find common traits/goals to match mentees with the appropriate mentors. Potentially more personally fulfilling. Less widespread corporate benefit. Recommend advanced approval from employer.

16 Mentoring Do’s Set a meeting schedule that has the least chance for canceling or rescheduling. Establish ground rules in advance. Examples: Is this confidential? Is it ok to discuss co- workers…salary issues…human resources concerns? Set goals for mentee and mentor in advance. Examples: I would like to hone my interviewing skills. I cannot seem to relate to younger employees. Schedule periodic progress ‘check-ins.’ Set a time limit for the formal relationship. Public recognition of program and relationship. Share small success stories.

17 Mentoring Don’ts Improperly managing professional vs. personal discussions. Poor public/institutional mentor program knowledge. Mentoring relationships take time…don’t rush. Choose words and generalizations carefully. One insensitive comment can sour a relationship. Mentees want to give back as well. Make sure there is an opportunity for sharing knowledge. Mentors can learn as much as they teach.

18 Getting Started…It’s Easy! Announce your new Mentoring Initiative Determine what job classifications will participate. Consider traditional and non-traditional relationships. Develop brief mentor and mentee questionnaire including: –Qualities supporting your role as mentor or mentee. –Short & long term employment and personal goals. –Anticipated goals/objectives from the mentoring program. Determine the most appropriate mentoring format for your institution. Slowly break through the obvious awkwardness. Have fun!

19 Group Mentoring Success Story: Boston Children’s Hospital Pathology Summer Internship Program Program Outline: Weekend anatomic pathology tour of high school seniors and juniors interested in biology, anatomy and/or forensics. Subsequent selection of 8-10 students for the formal summer internship program. One week, two week or monthly internships across all anatomic pathology operations.

20

21

22

23

24

25

26 Michael M., Pathology Technician

27

28 Kristin R., Administrative Associate

29 Group Mentoring Success Story: Boston Children’s Hospital Pathology Summer Internship Program Program Results : Eleven high school seniors changed their majors or college choices to focus on biology, medical technology (HT and PA), medical school (pathologist), and/or pathology administration summer interns for two weeks per interns. Dozens of completed projects….many of which we could not get our own employees to do! Four permanent summer temps/volunteers….FREE! Exposed many young people to our industry. Dozens of college application letters written…many recognizing the pathology internship as a primary reason for the college acceptance. Met some terrific young people and their grateful families. Three full time FTE’s (Pathology Technician, Research Assistant, Administrative Associate). Arguably one of the most rewarding things I have ever done.

30 Important Final Considerations Investigate internal policies regarding internships vs. volunteer programs vs. mentoring programs. Quietly investigate before you ask! Be certain to address liability issues with the sponsoring school officials and all tour attendees/interns. School bus vs. private transportation Strictly enforce all non-employee biohazard, physical, chemical risk issues Parking Department/institutional clearance forms HIPAA Set clear expectations for everything (food, cell phones, social media, personal belongings, clothing, etc)

31 References Cross-generational learning: Baby boomers #ReverseMentoring to learn from Gen Y teachers, Knock, Anne, Learning | Leadership | Innovation | Change Blog, June 10, Defining the Key Elements of an Optimal Residency Program, Ruffin, Alexis, Organization of Resident Representatives, Association of American Medical Colleges, May Demystifying Mentoring, Gallo, Amy, Harvard Business Review Magazine, February 1, Mentoring Millennials, Meister, Jeanne C. and Willyerd, Karie, Harvard Business Review Magazine, May National Resident Matching Program, Results of the 2013 NRMP Applicant Survey, National Resident Matching Program, April Will You Be My Mentor?, Sandberg, Sheryl, Musings at Work Blog, July 18, 2013.

32


Download ppt "Mentoring in the Pathology Department John A. Baci, MBA, C-PM Pathology Director, Boston Children’s Hospital 2014 West, Midwest & Canada Regional APC/PDAS."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google