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Leading the Change to the Common Core State Standards: Essential Tools for School and District Leaders LITERACY MISIC Institute Sue Z. Beers This PLC.

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Presentation on theme: "Leading the Change to the Common Core State Standards: Essential Tools for School and District Leaders LITERACY MISIC Institute Sue Z. Beers This PLC."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leading the Change to the Common Core State Standards: Essential Tools for School and District Leaders LITERACY MISIC Institute Sue Z. Beers This PLC Study of the Common Core is based on the work that Sue Beers and her team from MISIC have done. They have spent hours finding the “best of the best” common core resources for all of us to use to learn more about the Common Core, Next Generation Assessments, etc. Sue Beers presented this information on the Common Core at a workshop held in Ankeny on November 13 and 14. (This workshop is being presented all across the country.) It has been summarized and notes added for your PLC team to view on the screen as well as follow along with this power point with notes. With Sue’s power point and her notes, I have added my notes to this that I took as well as to make it “PLC team friendly” for you. Note that there are web links, video clips, etc. in the power point/notes for you to access during your time with all of this.

2 Common Core State Standards
New Generation State Assessments Two huge “waves of change” are coming at us: Common Core State Standards and New Generation State Assessments (PARCC and Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium). To some, these waves will be an invitation to surf and they look forward to the ride; to others, these waves are tsunamis! TIME!! We need to MOVE. In Next Generation Assessments will be here. Already two years into the process, we need to pick up speed. What about the New Generation State Assessments? If we are doing a good job teaching to the Common Core Standards while reaching the level of rigor when teaching, our kids will be ready for the assessments.

3 Common Core: A Fast Timeline
June 2009 Beginning of CCSS Initiative March 2010 K-12 Draft Released for Public Comment June 2010 Formal Release of K-12 CCSS Implementation is NOW! Participating States Administer New CCSS Assessments Dec. 2011 46 States Have Adopted CCSS It has been two years since the formal release of the K-12 Common Core and less than a year since some of the 46 states have adopted them. With the new Common Core assessments coming in the , there is a need for immediate action in aligning curriculum and instruction around the Common Core. Review the time line above! Yes, it is true that is fast approaching!

4 Review the chart above as taken from some discussions with teachers from across the country … Discuss the concerns on this slide with your team. DISCUSSION WITH TEAM!

5 Yes, it is something totally different…we need significant changes in how we do business in schools!
Curriculum Models/Frameworks Curriculum Alignment Curriculum Comparisons Formative and Summative Assessments Differentiation

6 Initiative Fatigue in Action
Recognize this Person? Watch The Video Clip … “Teacher Rant” (MonsonMegan) Click on the web link on the power point.

7 We all have “too much on our plate…” We need to look at what is there and determine what is not nutritious – what needs to be eliminated – what needs more “seasoning” on our plates . . . Yes, everyone has a full plate But Common Core is not about ADDING to the plate, it is about cleaning up the plate and changing the plate.

8 Our goal is to create an instructional plate that is both nutritious and balanced and that will lead us to a “healthy education” resulting in students who are college and career ready. Every time we design an activity for the classroom, our number one question should be: How will doing this add to students’ knowledge or skills? What will students be able to do better or differently from before we started this activity? It doesn’t mean we take all the fun out. We just have to ask--is this worth doing? WHAT DOES WORTH DOING MEAN? DISCUSS WITH YOUR TEAM! [Sue’s personal mission is to get rid of word search puzzles in all classrooms. They are not worth anything … If you are using word searches, throw them out!)

9 Implementing the CCSS What Now? Now What? What Should?
This workshop was organized around three major phases: creating a vision or understanding about the Common Core, conducting a gap analysis between what is currently happening in classrooms and the actions needed to implement the Common Core, and monitoring progress on how well the changes that are being made. Simply put, these phases address the questions: What is happening now? What should be happening? And now what do we need to do to fully implement the Common Core? What Now? What Should? Now What?

10 Vision / Understanding
When you read the questions on this slide around the vision/understand, what thoughts come to mind? (Discuss as a team) When the common core is implemented, what will it look like? How will I know that it is being implemented correctly? Do we have a clear vision of what we should see in the classrooms? Why should we only look forward – and not focus on the past? How will you know that implementation is being done with fidelity? DISCUSSION OF QUESTIONS!

11 Implementation Questions addressed in the Implementation phase include… What needs to happen to move toward full implementation of the Common Core? What is happening right now that is consistent with the standards? What needs to change? What do we need to stop doing? What are your team’s thoughts as you go through these questions? DISCUSSION!

12 Monitoring Progress Questions addressed in the Monitoring Progress phase include… How will you be self monitoring the progress of common core implementation? What will constitute evidence of success? DISCUSSION!

13 Major changes lie ahead with the implementation of the Common Core!
“It’s not tweaking what we have, it’s not business as usual, it’s not about doing what we have done in the past…. It’s focusing on the future! You don’t continue to look out the rear window, you have to look through the windshield. So when you think of it’s NOT business as usual … what is your team doing differently to implement the Common Core? DISCUSSION!

14 Green Flags & Red Flags for Implementation
The Common Core State Standards for ELA / Literacy Green Flags and Red Flags for Implementation for Literacy/Reading We are going to dig deeper into the Green Flags/Red Flags of the Common Core. (Some of you have looked at these Green Flags/Red Flags previously … we will now continue to go deeper with all of this!)

15 LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS
STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS JUNE 2010 Let’s begin by looking at the structure of the ELA / Literacy standards. Go to this web site and see what is has to offer you! (Click on the link. Take some time to explore) As Sue shared, “We need to look at the forest first and how ideas build and interrelate … we don’t want to start looking at each tree/each standard separately yet.” 15

16 Don’t start by looking at each tree – each standard…
We are going to take a look from above .. The vision of the whole common core!

17 Look at the BIG picture – the whole forest!
We have to look at the whole forest … so that is what we are going to do!

18 College and Career Standards ANCHOR the learning we want students to achieve…
The standards were designed “backwards” by first developing a set of College and Career Standards that define college and career readiness. From those descriptions (anchor standards), the grade level expectations were derived. Each of the grade-level standards build on one another, eventually providing all students with the skills they will need to be college and career ready. College and Career Standards ANCHOR the learning we want students to achieve! Do you know that statistics are showing that 50% of students going on to college are not prepared in the areas of reading/writing? When you think of our graduates, where are we at with this statistic? What can we do today to improve this type of statistic? DISCUSSION!

19 All of the standards flow from the College and Career anchor standards
This diagram from the Missouri Department of Education demonstrates how the Common Core State Standards for ELA / Literacy are organized. Note that … All of the standards flow from the College and Career anchor standards The standards are grade-level based Standard strands are continued across grade levels in a parallel structure K-5 includes foundational reading skills, which discontinue after grade 5 Literacy Standards for History / Social Studies, Science and technical (other) subjects are only for reading and writing. Standards are written separately for literary and informational text. Common Core Standards… provide for a real learning progression! What are kids getting in 5th grade they didn’t get in 4th grade? If they miss it in 4th grade, they will not get these again in 5th grade – in some cases! The students must learn what they are expected to learn at each grade level!  http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/documents/cur-ela-comcore-ela-literacy-roadmap.pdf

20 Design and Organization
Three main sections K-5 (cross-disciplinary) 6-12 English Language Arts 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects There are 3 main sections to the standards: (Yes, literacy must go across all subject areas for all of us to improve the skills of the students!) K-5 (cross-disciplinary) 6-12 English Language Arts 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

21 Design and Organization
Three appendices A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms (Appendix A) B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks (Appendix B) C: Annotated student writing samples (Appendix C) Critical to understanding the ELA / Literacy standards are the three appendices… Appendix A, Appendix B, and Appendix C. These documents provide further insight and clarity around the standards and should be studied as part of the process of understanding the standards. Take a few minutes to look at this resource. You may find these at the following URL: These are available in booklets and can be purchased from the AEA. (Some teachers in the district currently have these. If you do not have these and are interested in these, please talk with your principal.) REVIEW THESE DOCUMENTS … Hard copy or On Line!

22 Key Design Considerations: ELA
Standards define year-end expectations that lead to college and career readiness. Focus on results rather than means. Integrated model of literacy Research and media skills blended into the standards Shared responsibility for literacy development Focus and coherence in instruction and assessment. In designing the Common Core in ELA / Literacy, the authors used these Key Design Considerations. They are the foundation for the standards and those implementing the standards need to keep these in mind as they review the standards and determine how to implement them in classroom instruction. It’s about results not means. It’s about where our students need to be at the end of grade 1… grade 2 … grade 3 … that lead to college and career readiness. Integrated Model of literacy (example: reading/writing/grammar, etc. -- integrated! Not taught as separate subjects) Research and media blended into standards .. Big emphasis on research! Fewer standards than in the past More clarity Higher levels (more rigor) than ever before … and we’re all responsible! (Exploratory teachers, science, history, etc. are also responsible for the literacy component of the common core!) As you look at these, please discuss what these mean for your students and for you, the classroom teachers … REVIEW AND DISCUSS!

23 To begin to understand the big picture of the ELA / Literacy standards, start by reviewing the Key Points in English Language Arts from the site in more detail. (Very Important Document To View!) Continue to see all of the resources available to learn more about the Common Core to help you with implementation! (REVIEW AND DISCUSS)

24 What is NOT in the Standards…
How teachers should teach All that can or should be taught The nature of advanced work beyond the core The interventions needed for students well below grade level The full range of support for English language learners and students with special needs Everything needed to be college and career ready It is important to keep in mind what is NOT in the standards. The standards are not a curriculum – they do not specify HOW the standards should be taught or how the needs of unique students should be met (e.g. those who need interventions, those who are advanced, or the needs of ELL students). Nor do the standards include everything that might be necessary to adequately prepare students to be college and career ready. The standards form a foundation for understanding and defining the important knowledge and skills students need to be successful in college and in their career, but the “How-To’s” are in the hands of teachers, schools and districts. Read through the points on the slide and discuss .. .so, what does this mean for us? DISCUSS!

25 Shifts… In understanding the big picture of the standards, it is important to look at several key shifts in “how we do business” in delivering instruction. “Covering” or “checking off” the standards is not the goal – depth, focus and rigor are the goals. Students will be asked to think deeply and critically about what they read, hear and view and be able to express their understanding clearly and with support from text. DISCUSS how you are moving to these major shifts …

26 ELA Major Shifts Shift to higher-level thinking skills
Increasing focus on informational text Not coverage, but depth and focus: RIGOR Writing about texts, citing sources *Shift to higher-level thinking skills *Increasing focus on informational text *Not coverage, but depth and focus: RIGOR! *Not 9-week units on separate ideas – COMBINING topics *Writing about texts, citing sources The Common Core gives us the chance to delete – to get rid of content and activities that don’t lead students to be college and career ready. So, what should we stop doing!? Writing for example – Not separate writing, listening, reading, grammar, etc. It is integrated! Whole new way we teach literacy. Get rid of content and activities that don’t lead to be college and career ready. Use the textbook as a resource….not the Bible!

27 Use the “Delete” Button!
CCSS give us the chance to delete – to get rid of content and activities that don’t lead students to be college and career ready. We need to use the “delete button” in our curriculum and instruction and determine what the best instructional plate will look like. The Common Core gives us guidance – we just have to have the will to “hit the button!”

28 CCR Standards for Reading
Organized in four key areas: 1. Key Ideas and Details 2. Craft and Structure 3. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity This is important to know about the College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading: The standards are organized for the literary and informational text under these four key areas. 1. Key Ideas and Details 2. Craft and Structure 3. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

29 CCR Standards for Reading
Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. We will look at the 10 anchor standards for each of the four areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. So, here you find the standards for Key Ideas and Details. Read and then place a circle around the number of the standard that you believe will require the most work to move from current practice to full implementation.

30 CCR Standards for Reading
Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Continue … As we look at each of the four key areas for reading (Craft and Structure), put a put a circle around the number of the standard that you believe will require the most work to move from current practice to full implementation.

31 CCR Standards for Reading
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Continue … As we look at each of the four key areas for reading (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas), put a circle around the number of the standard that you believe will require the most work to move from current practice to full implementation.

32 CCR Standards for Reading
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Continued from previous slide… Note that the goal is students reading independently and proficiently. As we look at each of the area for reading (Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity), what types of complex reading are you asking of your students? Discuss! Be specific.

33 ELA & Literacy: 6 Shifts Condensed into 3 Shifts
Balance of Information and Literary Text (K-5) Content Area Literacy (6-12) Appropriately complex text Text-dependent questions Writing to inform/argue based on evidence Academic vocabulary vs. domain-specific vocabulary Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. Reading and writing grounded in evidence from text. Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary. 6 Shifts Balance of Information and Literary Text (K-5) Content Area Literacy (6-12) Appropriately complex text Text-dependent questions Writing to inform/argue based on evidence Academic vocabulary vs. domain-specific vocabulary Note: You may see in various places that the six shifts have been condensed into 3 Shifts (easier to remember) Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational texts Reading and writing grounded in evidence from text Regular practice with complex text and its vocabulary

34 Green Flags / Red Flags ELA / Literacy Mathematics
Just overview of what we should be doing in ELA/Literacy and Math (Green Flags/Red Flags) … and what we should stop doing! These are the major shifts in the reading/writing and math areas! ELA / Literacy Mathematics

35 SHIFT 1: Building Knowledge by Balancing Informational and Literary Texts
SEE NOT SEE Scientific and historical texts are given the same time and weight as literary text. Informational text in elementary comprise 50% of text used in ELA, science, social studies and the arts; in middle school, informational texts comprise 55%; in high school, informational text comprise at least 70%. Informational texts are selected to help students deepen their understanding of topics and themes over time. Literature is the sole or vast majority of text used in ELA classes. All or majority of text is narrative in structure. Texts do not logically develop learning about a specific topic or theme. Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy. To understand the major changes that will be required to fully implement the Common Core State Standards, we will be examining 6 critical shifts necessary from current practice. You have a handout called “Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy” that define what each of the 6 shifts “look like” in practice – and what they don’t look like. As we move through each shift, you will be asked to reflect on how well current practice matches the criteria for each of these shifts. (Explained as we continue …) Walk through briefly and discuss the criteria for Shift 1 as stated on this slide. Highlight or underline the key concepts on your hard copy found in your folder.

36 Why the Focus on Informational Text?
Harder for students to comprehend informational text than narrative text Much of our knowledge base comes from info text Academic vocabulary comes largely from info text Makes up 80% of the required reading in college/ workplace Yet students are asked to read 7-15% of it in elementary and middle school When you look at the “why” more informational text on this slide, what point really stands out for you? What is your team doing to put more of a focus on informational text? What are some specific examples? DISCUSS!

37 Reading Framework for NAEP 2009
Grade Literary Informational 4 50% 8 45% 55% 12 30% 70% Standards demand a greater focus on informational text literary nonfiction. The standards mirror the types of reading tested by NAEP. (National Assessment of Educational Progress) These percentages are the MINIMUM they should be having…across the disciplines throughout the entire school day. The focus: kids need to read text in a variety of forms. The amount of required informational text is increasing through the years in education. *How much informational versus literary text do you read at this time? Are you asking students to think at the higher levels as defined by Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy? Discuss!

38 INFORMATIONAL Text Literary Nonfiction and Historical, Scientific, and Technical Texts Biographies and autobiographies Primary sources Books about history, social studies, science, and the arts Technical texts, including directions, forms, and information displayed in graphs, charts, or maps Digital sources on a range of topics Informational text comprises over 80% of what adults read in their everyday lives. If we are to prepare students to be college and career ready, we need to have what they read in school mirror what they will read after graduation. Why the focus on Informational Text? Reading a story is much EASIER than reading informational text Again, 80% of required reading for college and the work place is informational reading. As you look at the ideas on this slide, which ones are you integrating into your curriculum and what are some other ideas? DISCUSS!

39 More ideas for you … This chart breaks down text genres in order to identify the types of reading that are included in literary and informational text. What is something new from this chart or something you haven’t used for awhile that you could use with your students? (This chart is found on page 25 of the “Understanding The Common Core” packet.)

40 Appendix B: Text Exemplars http://www.corestandards.org
Appendix B of the Common Core provides text exemplars that help us understand the type of text that ALL students should be reading at each grade level. Appendix B: Exemplars of text for each grade Literary and informational text Sample performance tasks Go to Appendix B. What is one that you could try with your students?

41 Read like a detective! Use clues / evidence from text Make non-trivial inferences based on that evidence Use information from multiple sources within or between text to make arguments The Common Core in ELA / Literacy ask students to “read like a detective.” They use evidence from the text in supporting their arguments and assertions. Their inferences are meaningful and are based on evidence from the text. They use multiple sources of information as the basis for their arguments. READ LIKE A DETECTIVE! We want kids to be able to take evidence from text. Are the kids reading for understanding? How many kids actually read the text you give them, actually read for understanding at Middle School Level? 10% of kids! What about at the High School Level? % No wonder they are not excelling in their reading skills… Yes, we have work to do! DISCUSSION! Different teachers have different expectations (routines and procedures)… students vary their approach to reading to meet each teacher’s expectations.

42 Taking Stock: Balancing Informational and Literary Texts
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to page 5 of your “Understanding The Common Core” packet. With this in hand, Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy, take a few minutes to briefly assess where you think you are right now with this first major shift --Balancing Informational and Literary Texts. Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

43 SHIFT 2: Content Area Literacy 6-12
SEE NOT SEE All content area teachers explicitly teach reading and writing strategies essential to learning and communicating their discipline. Students are asked questions that give them the opportunity to share evidence from text. Activities strengthen students’ listening skills as well as their speaking skills. Students write frequently about what they are reading and learning, drawing evidence in the text. Reading and writing strategies are presented consistently across all content areas. Multiple texts, presented in diverse formats, are used to integrate information on a given topic. Primary sources of information are used widely. Teachers present the information in the text rather than expecting students to read for understanding. Text is used as a reference rather than a source of information. No connection between the reading and writing assignment. No instruction is provided on reading or writing strategies appropriate to the content area. A single text is used for all reading assignments. For All Teachers in Grades 5-12 … even though it says, grade 6-12 … With our middle school (other middle schools) being 5-8, it is important that the middle school teachers are all reviewing this. Shift #2 reflects the premise of the Common Core that literacy is a responsibility of all teachers in all content areas. The authors of the Common Core included the literacy standards for history/social studies, science and technical (all other) subjects because they recognized that literacy skills are developed in every content area. It is not enough to ASK students to read and write in every content area, they must be given the skills and knowledge to be able to tackle the specific literacy demands of each content area. Reading in the Content Areas – No longer an encouragement, no longer a choice… everyone MUST do it! Kids have to read text… science text, history text, industrial text, music text, etc.

44 Reading critical to building knowledge
Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects 6-12 Reading critical to building knowledge Appreciation for norms and conventions Evidence Understanding domain specific words Analyze, evaluate, argue, synthesize Complement the disciplines: Foundation So what does subject-specific literacy entail? The literacy standards for content areas beyond ELA are grounded in these principles and goals .. What are they saying? Discuss this slide and the expectations in these areas. Word-Sound Recognition in Science (many words do not sound like they look) Reading is NOT decoding… not about saying the words on the page…it’s about thinking about the words on the page We have to redefine reading… we have to ask kids to “THINK” about what you ask them to read… not “READ” a text, “THINK” about the text. … and then what!?? DISCUSSION!

45 This is a great resource to help you develop tasks around a variety of skills – analysis, comparison, cause/effect, etc. Notice this resource is set up for work after researching a topic or after reading about a topic. Refer to page in the “Understanding the Common Core” packet … how might you be able to use this?

46 Task 1: After researching ________ (informational texts) on
________ (content), write a/an ________ (essay or substitute) that argues your position on ________ (content). Support your position with evidence from your research. L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. Check out the web site for more resources to help you build tasks, etc.

47 (Informational or Explanatory/Synthesis) http://educurious.org/
General Science LDC Task 18 for Background Research: After researching and reading ___________(multiple types of sources including: scientific journal publications, book chapters, and other texts) on the ________ (problem) you are investigating, write a review of the literature that summarizes the current state of the problem, describes the major lines of evidence foregrounded in each source, and specifies the implications of that research for your problem of _______(problem). Identify any gaps or unanswered questions that your research will address. Include a reference list. (Informational or Explanatory/Synthesis) Educurious … a resource to check out today! (Learning That Connects You To Others!) Watch the two-minute video clip on engaging students .. Then check out other resources on this site.

48 Library of Congress Grant
Using Primary Resources Plus … Humanities/Social Studies/English/Language Arts Teachers … Check this site for great lesson plans, resources, ideas, etc. that are aligned with the Common Core! Click on link on power point!

49 Taking Stock: Content Area Literacy
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to your packet, page 5 and 6: Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy. (Content Area Literacy) Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

50 SHIFT 3: Regular Practice with Complex Text
SEE NOT SEE Same, grade-appropriate, high-quality text for all. Appropriate scaffolding to help students understand complex text, based on individual needs, building toward goal of independent reading. Reading strategies embedded in the activity of reading rather than as a separate body of material. Students required to think critically about the text. Instruction often centered on multiple close readings in order to develop deep understanding. Teachers can identify and evaluate the complexity of text in their content areas. Students read from complex texts from a wide variety of text structures (narrative, cause and effect, compare and contrast, etc.) Students always receive different levels of text based on their reading ability. No instruction is provided for reading strategies to approach complex text. Students are given a summary of the text prior to reading it. No support is provided for students who read below grade level. Majority of text uses a single text structure. Shift 3 emphasizes the need for ALL students to have regular practice with complex text at grade level. It is about developing the stamina and persistence in students to critically read – with deep understanding! Text Complexity Matters The KEY for Shift 3: Making sure all kids are reading grade appropriate text… Use same text for all with scaffolding... May give some leveled text to build background, build foundation, etc. but we have to have ALL KIDS reading grade-level texts! (yes, including ELL students, special education students, etc.) Discuss what you should NOT be seeing .. How are you working with this?

51 Text Complexity Matters
Students who reached benchmark scores and did well in college: Ability to make inferences while reading or answering questions Ability to answer questions associated with complex text - ACT, Reading Between the Lines (Information from CCSS, Appendix A, page 4.) In setting the criteria for college readiness (in determining the score necessary for college success), ACT has defined these abilities as critical. Ability to make inferences while reading or answering questions Ability to answer questions associated with complex text Your thoughts? Experiences with college kids? DISCUSS!

52 College Readiness and Reading
47% of students meeting reading benchmark also met the science benchmark; only 5% of students who did not meet the reading benchmark also met the science benchmark. Difference between students who did / did not score above reading benchmark was the degree of text complexity. In summary -- After analyzing the data, the kids who passed--still did poorly on the high degree of complexity questions … It’s why we have kids going to college and failing; they are not ready for the college texts. So, how can your team help kids get ready for college text? DISCUSS! “Aspects of Text Complexity Project: Why Complex Text Matters, David Liben

53 College Readiness and Reading
Students below the benchmark (49%) scored no better than chance on multiple-choice items associated with complex text. Only nearly perfect scores (35/36) did as well on complex text as challenging text; significant # who met the benchmark still scored relatively poorly on complex text. Again, what are your thoughts on these statistics … DISCUSS! “Aspects of Text Complexity Project: Why Complex Text Matters, David Liben

54 College Readiness and Reading
Critical thinking does not distinguish College and Career Readiness from those who are not; facility with reading complex text does! They can THINK, but can they READ? Kids do not know how to read the text to think critically. This is not skim and scan; it is about deep comprehension. Kids need to know the difference between skimming and deep reading. How do you define CRITICAL THINKING in your classroom? DISCUSS! Great Article to Read on Text Complexity: “Aspects of Text Complexity Project: Why Complex Text Matters, David Liben “Aspects of Text Complexity Project: Why Complex Text Matters, David Liben

55 Why Complex Text? Think deeply about texts
Must read closely Think deeply about texts Participate in discussions based on text Gain knowledge Publishers Criteria for ELA/Literacy Grades 3-12, p. 3 In order to read complex text, students must be able to deeply understand and talk (and write) about the knowledge they gained from the text.  **This is the HIGHEST PRIORITY FOR Common Core State Standards … “…reading closely and gain knowledge from texts.” Publishers Criteria for ELA/Literacy Grades 3-12, p. 6 How will instruction be changed to reflect this?

56 Why Not Use Simple Texts?
Simplified texts often restricted, limited, and thin in meaning Complex texts are rich in academic vocabulary; simple texts do not expose students to the type of vocabulary necessary to read complex texts. Mature language skills are gained by working with demanding materials No evidence that struggling readers—especially at middle and high school—catch up by gradually increasing the complexity of simpler texts - Adapted from the work of Jean M. Evans Davila, www. Redapplesnorwalk.org If students are not exposed to grade level, complex text; they will not have access to the full range of vocabulary needed to expand their vocabularies. In addition, they will not be exposed to the types of text structures that are used in complex texts. Without this exposure, students will continue to fall behind in their abilities to read the types of text that are demanded in college and in careers. Do not throw out the simple text… but still we have to have kids reading at grade-level! Based on this research, what do we need to change? Discuss!

57 Among Highest Priority for CCSS:
“…read closely and gain knowledge from texts.” Publishers Criteria for ELA/Literacy Grades 3-12, p. 6 The main purpose for reading is gain knowledge. To develop a knowledge base, students must read closely and critically the complex text appropriate for each grade level. Again ,,,   **The HIGHEST PRIORITY FOR Common Core State Standards … “…reading closely and gain knowledge from texts.” Publishers Criteria for ELA/Literacy Grades 3-12, p.6

58 What is Close Reading? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w9v6-zUg3Y
What is Close Reading? Watch this three-minute video clip off You Tube … Other video clips: Close Reading and how it relates to the Common Core a careful and purposeful rereading of a text an encounter where students really focus on author’s message, text structure, meaning of words, etc. understanding what the author had to say and bringing some of your own ideas to bear on that text must give some text independent questions –not recall, but questions that provoke deep reading, deep thinking, and deep understanding have to learn the text well students must provide evidence and justification pay attention to words, ideas, texture, flow, etc. think about what author said… and compare to what they know, what they think, and what they believe More great video clips that talk about the strategies to implement the Common Core. Check out some of the video clips on this site, too.

59 ALL Students: Anchor Texts at Grade Level
Above Grade Level Texts for Advanced Readers ALL Students: Anchor Texts at Grade Level The standards refer to a “staircase of complexity” that reaches from Kindergarten through 12th grade. Anchor texts are those that are required for all students at a given grade level. At times, students may need to begin by reading from texts that are at a lower level as a starting point for building knowledge, but should quickly rise to reading the anchor texts that are written at grade level and that will advance their reading skills. Students who are already reading above grade level should be provided with advanced texts that match their abilities. Appendix B has more examples. Texts Below Grade Level – Scaffolding Only!

60 Progression of Reading Standard 10
Grade Reading Standard 10 (individual text types omitted) K Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. 1 With prompting and support, read prose and poetry [informational texts] of appropriate complexity for grade 1. 2 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature [informational texts] in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 3 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature [informational texts] at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. 4 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature [informational texts] in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 5 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature [informational texts] at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. Notice … Progression Chart for each standard is available (You have to look at these documents closely .. This is in Resources – N Drive under Common Core) Starting in grade 2, text complexity is defined in grade bands (2-3, 4-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11-CCR) First year of band: expected by end of year to read and comprehend w/scaffolding as needed at high end of range of texts Last year of band: expected by end of year to read and comprehend independently and proficiently within the band. Notes on Terms: Scaffolding—TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE to perform task otherwise could not do alone. Goal of fostering student’s capacity to perform task on his/her own later on. PROFICIENTLY—Student performance as measured by teacher or assessment. Suggests a performance done WITHOUT scaffolding, such as reading a text with comprehension. INDEPENDENTLY: Student performance done WITHOUT scaffolding. This would mean student is able to read a text by him/herself on an assessment, as well.

61 Overview of Text Complexity
Qualitative Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands Quantitative Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity Teachers need the ability to make informed decisions about the difficulty of a text. Qualitative measures take into account the requirements of the text in regards to levels of meaning, various structures, the conventionality of the text and the knowledge demands that are need to fully comprehend the text. Quantitative measures refer to the readability of the text, as indicated by a measure such as the Lexile score of the text. Reader and Task demands determine whether a given text is appropriate for the student in terms of their cognitive abilities, motivation, topic knowledge, and interests in their ability to complete the assigned task for the reading. The KEY for Text Complexity: Demand close attention and often demand rereading in order to be fully understood. Reader and Task Reader and Task – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned

62 Language Convention and Clarity
Background Prior Knowledge Cultural Vocabulary Standard English Variations Register Genre Organization Narration Text Features Graphics Density and Complexity Figurative Language Purpose Levels of Meaning Structure Knowledge Demands Language Convention and Clarity Keep looking at the four areas outlined when you think of text complexity .. Levels of Meaning, Structure, Language Convention and Clarity, and Knowledge Demands

63 Text Complexity Sophistication of language and content
Subtlety of themes and issues Extract knowledge and information from reference materials, technical manuals, literature and other texts Demanding and context-dependent vocabulary Subtle relationships among ideas and characters Nuanced rhetorical style and tone Elaborate structures or formats Demand close attention and often demand rereading in order to be fully understood In determining the complexity of the text, these characteristics of the text must be considered. (What would each of these look like in your classroom?) Sophistication of language and content Subtlety of themes and issues Extract knowledge and information from reference materials, technical manuals, literature and other texts Demanding and context-dependent vocabulary Subtle relationships among ideas and characters Nuanced rhetorical style and tone Elaborate structures or formats Demand close attention and often demand rereading in order to be fully understood

64 Text Quality Rich in content
Provide strong models of thinking and writing Broad resonance and are referred to and quoted often Provide students with deep engagement in the world and a variety of cultures Reflect on important issues in the disciplines Build background knowledge and vocabulary essential to reach College and Career Readiness levels. What makes a quality text? Texts selected for inclusion in instruction must be of high-quality. They need to be WORTH READING. They must be selected carefully not only for their complexity but for their importance to the content being studied. They must help students build background knowledge and vocabulary that will enable them to continue to build the skills they will need to read at levels that make them college and career ready. You have to have high quality text for kids to read Then you ask the questions: Is it worth it? Is it engaging? Does it make learning interesting? DISCUSS!

65 Text Range Variety of literary and informational texts
Read deeply across content areas to gain knowledge base Attend to author’s choice of words and structures / order and use of detail Acquire information from different formats in order to access knowledge College and Career Readiness Standard #10 specifically calls for students to read from a wide range of text, both literary and informational. The range of text that students should be asked to read should be varied, helping them gain background knowledge that they can continue to apply to new text. A variety of formats, genres, and text structures are needed. Students should be asked to think about how the author’s specific choice of words and the way those words are structured affect the meaning of the text.

66 Text Complexity Grade Bands and Associated Lexile Ranges
Text Complexity Grade Band in the Standards Old Lexile Ranges Lexile Ranges Aligned to CCR expectations K-1 N/A 2-3 4-5 6-8 9-10 11-CCR The Common Core reference Lexiles as one measure of the quantitative aspects of text complexity. To demonstrate how the levels of reading necessary to reach College and Career Readiness, look at the significant increase in Lexile ranges from current practice to those aligned with CCR expectations. The Lexile ranges to match the Standards’ text complexity grade bands has adjusted upward significantly. Note: The average high school student graduates with a 1155 Lexile which is now 8th grade level reading … So, what do we HAVE to do to up our Reading Text Complexity? Discuss! This may not be accomplished overnight we’ve got to get moving . ..

67 Check this relevant resource out …
Web Connection Compare-Contrast, Cause-Effect, Problem-Solution: Common ‘Text Types’ in The Times

68 Taking Stock: Regular Practice with Complex Text
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to page 6-7 of your “Understand the Common Core” Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy for Regular Practice With Complex Text With your team, take 3-5 minutes to briefly assess where you think you are right now – what you think you would see in classrooms in your school / district, by putting Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

69 SHIFT 4: Focus on Text-Based, Text- Specific Questions
SEE NOT SEE Rich and rigorous conversations are based on text. Students closely analyze text with evidence to back up their claims and conclusions. The majority of text-based questions focus conversations and writing and require students to utilize information from the text in their answers. Questions are of high value – they are worth thinking about and answering. Questions move beyond what is directly stated and ask students to make nontrivial inferences from evidence in the text. Background knowledge is used to illuminate text and not replace it. Students explore how specific words, details, structure and organization of text impact the meaning of the text as a whole. The bulk of questions regarding the text can be answered without reading the text, either because it is not directly related to the text or because students can answer by referencing teacher comments. Questions are primarily centered on students’ own experience or background. Students do not have to make connections within the text in order to answer questions. Throughout the Common Core, there is an emphasis on close reading and focusing on text-based, text-specific questions. The goal of this fourth shift is to ensure that students pay close attention to text and use text to support their assertions and arguments. Sometimes we have to provide background information so students will understand: What if students in Florida were taking a test and the questions included “acres of land” and “hatching of chickens” – will all students understand these words out of context? Would all of our students understand these concepts?

70 Goal of Close, Analytic Reading:
… be able to discern and cite evidence from text to support assertions. Analytic Reading + Analytic Writing = Analytic THINKING Locating evidence from text and be able to use it is broadly evident in the Common Core. It is the connection between analytic reading and analytic writing that will result in students becoming critical / analytic THINKERS. How are we creating analytic thinkers?

71 Close Reading Describe the problem in this text and how it is solved. Use information in the text to support your answer. Describe the process of ____ using information from the text. What is the author’s purpose in structuring paragraphs this way? Use details from the passage to support your answer. Examples of questions that direct students to do close reading in finding and using text-based, text-specific evidence from the text. Questions must be crafted to encourage students to dig deeper into the text to find answers and to understand the text. What can you add to the list?

72 Teaching Channel … one of the best places for classroom examples – classroom practice focusing on the Common Core! Check This Site Out! https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/high-school-literature-lesson-plan In one of the videos, Sarah Brown Wessling (Iowa Teacher of the Year/National Teacher of the Year) uses the Pinwheel Discussion tool to get students to dig deeper into the meaning of multiple literary pieces. Notice how she directs the students to create – and answer – the questions. Student-generated questions can be very effective in getting students to think more deeply about what they are reading. Check a few of these out with your team! (Sarah is featured in many of the video clips! She provides some great models of teaching strategies.) https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/high-school-literature-lesson-plan

73 For students to have deep connections to a common text, which occur in both conversations and writing, in order for them to develop habits for citing textual evidence that supports conclusions drawn from text. Citing textual evidence is so, so important!

74 High-quality questions help students read complex text…
Not skimming and scanning We need to recraft the questions we are asking students How do you know you are asking higher level questions? Refer to the New Bloom’s Taxonomy! (Page 19-20) If you can answer questions without even reading the text, they are not high-level questions. DISCUSS!

75 Text-Based Questions call for Text-Based Answers!
We have to model how we cite evidence! Every question needs to be tied to text (not right-there questions …) How do we make sure the majority of the questions we ask are not RIGHT-THERE Questions? How we format the task determines what level students will think.

76 Text-based Questions Choose texts worthy of re-reading.
Show students how to cite specific text to support answers Provide opportunities for higher-order thinking Develop students’ fascination with the text by making connections to real life When we think of asking text-based questions, we should only be asking our students to read texts worthy of re-reading. How will you determine if the text is worth re-reading or not?

77 Text-Based Questions should be…
Text-SPECIFIC rather than generic!!!  Are we giving kids questions that require them to think deeply and 2) get into the question?

78 Basal Alignment Project
If interested, go to the web site: You have to go out and access this site. Check these tools out! BASAL ALIGNMENT PROJECT Steal These Tools --takes us to Edmodo, select MH Treasures (CA)

79 Taking Stock: Text-Based Questions
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to page 7 of your packet … Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy. (Taking Stock: Text-Based Questions) Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

80 SHIFT 5: Writing Arguments and from Sources
SEE NOT SEE Students required to use more than one source of information in their writing, in addition to writing in response to a single text. Multiple short research projects as well as more sustained research. Students can independently conduct research, without direction from the teacher. Evidence from text is required in writing assignments and oral discussions. The majority of writing emphasizes the use of evidence to inform or make an argument. Student writing analyzes and synthesizes sources of information and present their findings that include careful analysis, well- defined claims and clear information. Students must have read and analyzed a text in order to respond appropriately to a prompt. There is a consistent and prevalent focus on argument, opinion and informative writing. Frequent, short, constructed-response to text-dependent questions. All analytic writing requires the use of evidence as students paraphrase, infer and integrate ideas from text. Students write primarily from their own experience or viewpoint. Students do not use a structured process for conducting research. No or little instruction is provided in how to support a claim or conclusion. Writing assignments are not tied to reading. Writing is not routine and continuous. The fifth shift focuses on writing arguments and from sources. Once students have closely read and understand one or more pieces of text, they need to be able to communicate their understanding by sharing it in writing – and of course, using evidence from the text(s) to support their arguments and claims. This type of writing mirrors the types of writing used in college and careers. Just an example: Less of “what I did on summer vacation” and more on the research around “what makes a great vacation”

81 Discuss with your team …
Why is the student’s ability to write sound arguments on substantive topics and issues important? College study requires students to argue frequently and present those arguments with research and clear rationale – evidence. Students need practice in developing clear, substantive arguments on important issues throughout their K-12 education. Spend about 2-3 minutes discussing this question above. Share your responses.

82 Common Core Writing Standards
Text Types and Purposes Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well- chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Note how these writing standards reflect the fifth shift … going to these three types of writing! In the real world, we do not write in isolation! We use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaboration with others  We have to help kids know the difference between text messaging and formal language.  Text messaging is comparable to short hand (Gregg or Forkner shorthand taught in the earlier years …) We could ask students to take out a half sheet of paper. Ask them to write a message in “text” format. Have them then turn their paper over and write in classroom format … It all depends on your audience! Discuss when and why you write the way you do. Could you do this with your students?

83 Informational / Explanatory
Three Types of Writing Argument Informational / Explanatory Narrative Support a claim Sound reasoning Relevant evidence Increase subject knowledge Explain a process Enhance understanding Conveys experience Tells a story These are the three types of writing are included in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Note the difference between them. Answer: Which type of writing is most prevalent now in your classrooms? What kinds of writing do you need to add? How are you moving to this? CHECK OUT THE RUBRICS IN YOUR PACKET on pages Are you using these? If not, how can you start using these?

84 NAEP 2011 Writing Framework
Grade To Persuade To Explain To Convey Experience 4 30% 35% 8 12 40% 20% The Common Core reflect the NAEP Writing framework and call for a significant shift in the types of writing students do. The percentage of persuasive and explanatory writing reflect the type of writing students will need to do in college and careers. Where is your grade level at when you look at these expectations?

85 College & Career Writing Standards
Production and Distribution of Writing Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Note the emphasis in Common Core Standard #6 on using technology. Writing is not only about coherence and clarity, but also about how that writing is published and shared. Also, note the language regarding interaction and collaboration with others.

86 College & Career Writing Standards
Research to Build / Present Knowledge Conduct short, as well as more sustained research projects based on questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. A strong emphasis of the College and Career standards is in the ability to conduct independent research that integrates multiple sources of information. Note that the ability to assess the credibility and accuracy of sources is a key component. Students should conduct multiple short research projects, as well as some extended research. How are you incorporating more research into your work with students?

87 College & Career Writing Standards
Range of Writing Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. In addition to formal writing, students must write frequently and routinely for a broad range of audiences and for a variety of tasks and purposes. What types of writing are your students doing? Does it meet the standards? What might you need to consider? Stop the narrative writing (slow it down at least) How can you do this?

88 Text Get It in Gear! Evidence from Text Writing
An emphasis on evidence from text permeated both reading and writing. The process of reading and writing are linked closely. Yes, we have to get it in gear .. and be sure we are in gear today!

89 In this video, Sarah Brown Wessling (Iowa Teacher of the Year/National Teacher of the Year) demonstrates the difference between narrative and argumentative writing. Note that all of the videos from the Teaching Channel are keyed to the Common Core! https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-narrative-to-argument# https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-narrative-to-argument#

90 Appendix C: Samples of student writing at each grade level that demonstrates mastery of standards Another great resource! (Then check out Appendix C for samples of writing expected at your grade level)

91 Taking Stock: Writing from Sources
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to page 7-9 in your packet -- Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy – Writing From Sources! Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

92 SHIFT 6: Academic Language
SEE NOT SEE Vocabulary instruction limited to copying definitions from dictionaries. Vocabulary instruction disconnected from the text under study. Vocabulary tests simply ask students to match the word with its definition. Words selected for vocabulary work are not related to the content or the text being studied. Focus on words which are prevalent in complex texts across content areas, as well as content-specific words. Instruction provided on how to use context clues in the text to determine the meaning of words. Direct instruction / support for understanding words students may not be able to figure out on their own using solely the text. Varied contexts, different meanings for the same words, are provided for teaching word meaning. Instruction causes students to think about words – why/ how specific words are used, how words change the meaning of text, varied meanings based on context, and word choice. Instruction is driven by addressing the diverse vocabulary levels of students. Students are expected to apply appropriate academic vocabulary in writing and in discussions. Shift #6 is about developing command of a wide vocabulary. Vocabulary is the foundation for both reading and writing, as the command of words is critical to both understanding text and writing about what one has learned. Read through and discus the green flags and the red flags by highlighting or underlining key concepts. If you ask students to look up a word, write the definition and use it in a sentence, stop it today! The students are not learning anything from this!  You have to provide 7-14 meaningful exposures to a word to retain the word!! How are you using the “RAP method” of vocabulary instruction? Constant exposure to students by using real words in real text… make it connect – not isolated!  The only time it is okay to present in isolation is with Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots.

93 Isabel Beck has defined 3 tiers of words.
Tier 1 includes the words of everyday language. (night, day, because, street, etc.) Tier 2 words are the general academic words mentioned in the College and Career standards. They are the language of a mature reader – because they often are found more in text than in speech. (manipulate, rendevzous, wrought, etc.). Tier 3 words are those that are specific to a content area and are necessary for reading and communicating about a particular content. The triangle represents the relative numbers of these words in text.

94 Note some of the characteristics of Tier 2 words.
How do teachers help students learn the Tier 2 words as well as those of their content area? Check out the web site below.

95 The words in blue are Tier 3 words. The words in red are Tier 2 words.

96 Taking Stock: Academic Language
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. Turn to Page 9 -- Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy. (Taking Stock: Academic Language) Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.)

97 K-2 Foundational Skills
SEE NOT SEE Individual student needs are diagnosed and addressed in the areas of concepts of print, phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, syntax and fluency. High-quality activities are provided for students who have demonstrated facility with the standards, such as extension assignments and more independent reading. There is sufficient instruction and practice for students to achieve accuracy in their reading. A variety of fluency building activities (e.g. monitored partner reading, choral reading, repeated readings) are used. Instruction is designed to meet the individual learning needs of students by focusing on the skills that students have been diagnosed as needing to develop. No diagnostic assessment information is used to drive instruction for individual or groups of students. All students receive the same instruction and activities. Reading activities are primarily focused on “round-robin” reading and worksheets. K-2 Teachers Only (3-5 Teachers may want to review this to be familiar with the expectations of K-2) While the K-2 Foundational Skills do not constitute one of the 6 major shifts for ELA / Literacy, it is important to note what is important at this level. The key to implementing the K-2 Foundational Skills is the diagnosis of student needs and the development of differentiated activities and practice for students based on that diagnosis. Variety in approaches are also key. No Crayola Curriculum How long does it take a kindergartener to color 7 ducks!? When we spend more time coloring, cutting, and pasting than we do learning.  High quality activities…not Crayola Curriculum! Diagnostics – are we giving the primary MAP test?  Instruction should be differentiated: good readers will need much less practice with these concepts than struggling readers will.  Teach students what they need to learn and not what they already know – You need to know when particular children or activities warrant more or less attention. Highlight or underline the key concepts!

98 Foundational Skills: K-5
Instruction should be differentiated: good readers will need much less practice with these concepts than struggling readers will. Teach students what they need to learn and not what they already know—to discern when particular children or activities warrant more or less attention. Foundational skills are only included in grades K-5 in the ELA Common Core. As always, the key is to meet individual learner needs!

99 Taking Stock: Foundational Skills
+ Fully prepared/We are ready to go! We have started but have more work to do. We have yet to tackle this/We have more to learn. K-2 Teachers: Turn to Page 10 in packet -- Green Flags / Red Flags for ELA / Literacy – Taking Stock: Foundational Skills! Ask one team member to be the recorder and mark the following: What are you seeing with your grade level/department? Place the following mark: a “+” sign in front of each of the characteristics for balancing informational and literary texts that you think you are doing well; a “” in front of those that you think you have somewhat in place, but have more work to do; a circle around each item that you think you are missing or that you need to do a great deal of work on. Any marks of a “check” or a “circle,” add one or two ways you could increase the level on the green flags and decrease the level on the red flags. (When we make a commitment in this way, more results happen.) .

100 College and Career Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening
Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Range of conversations and collaborations, diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. See Standards on power point -- College and Career Readiness for Speaking and Listening. We are not going to spend much time with the last of the standards – speaking and listening, but we need to acknowledge that they are there and attend to them – as we know we spend a great deal of time listening and speaking in our daily lives! Note how closely the standards for speaking and listening mirror the reading and writing standards in terms of how they ask students to think about what they are learning and how they communicate that learning.

101 College and Career Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. College and Career Readiness Standards… Continue discussion on how these mirror the standards for reading and writing.

102 Students who are College and Career ready…
Demonstrate independence Build strong content knowledge Respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline Comprehend as well as critique Value evidence Use technology and digital media Understand other perspectives and cultures From the Common Core for ELA / Literacy… Think about how the standards as a whole and how they lead to these characteristics of College and Career graduates. Will our students be ready??? How do we know? Discuss!

103 There are a number of changed priorities ahead in how we help students become literate and prepared for college and careers. We have to be wiling to implement the Common Core … even if it means stopping some of our favorite lessons or favorite units! We must have our students ready for careers and college!

104 Stop and SHARE… ONE Question that must be addressed … TWO Concerns that you will need to address… THREE Big Ideas to keep in mind as you move forward… Reflect on what we have discussed about ELA / Literacy standards. As a team, identify one question that must be addressed as you move to implementation, two concerns you have about how to implement the standards, and three big ideas that you think will help move you forward. DISCUSSION! 1 question … 2 concerns … 3 big ideas .. .

105 Tools for Digging Deeper Into the Standards
What Do Individual Standards Mean? There are so, so many resources available for us regarding the Common Core! What are the best resources? Sue Beers and her team from MISIC have researched and found the best resources for us. These are found on the “N Drive” under Staff .. Folder entitled Common Core! You will be looking at these later. You will find a few highlighted in the next few slides.

106 Every district in Iowa has access and an account.
A great resource to look at the standards and what they each mean in regards to knowledge, skills, understanding, evidence of attainment, etc. for all grade levels. Take some time to explore this site and move through the various grade levels, topics, etc. to see how valuable this tool can be. You will be working with this later. User Name: Teacher6867 Password: Curriculum

107 When planning instruction…
Look one grade up and one grade down… The Common Core Standards were purposefully written as a progression of skills over grade levels, leading to the ultimate goal of college and career readiness. The grade level standards below a given grade define what students SHOULD know and the grade level above defines what students will learn next. To continue our trip analogy: when you are driving, you need to keep your eyes looking down the road and periodically glance in the rear view mirror.

108 Scaffolding: Like Learning to Ride a Bike
Small hints and tips Extra materials and supports Support and encourage!!! While the goal of the standards is to have every student meet the grade level expectations identified in the standards, scaffolding will certainly be necessary at times to help students quickly ascend to the level of performance needed to meet the standards. Scaffolding is not about “dumbing down” the curriculum; it is about building up students’ skills and confidences to be successful at the grade level. Strong guidance and additional instruction

109 One tool that will be helpful to understanding the changes that will need to be made to instruction and curriculum is the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) Model Content Framework. Even districts who are part of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium will benefit from having teachers and administrators review this document for guidance, since both consortiums are designing assessments that measure the same standards.

110 Planning the Curriculum to Meet the Literacy CCSS
1st Quarter STANDARDS Reading Complex Texts (RL/RI.6.10) Writing About Texts (W.6.1-6, 9-10) RL / RI W.6.1, 2, 4-9 RL/RI Short Texts Extended Text Routine Writing Writing Analyses Narrative Writing Research Project ACTIVITIES / CONTENT 3-5 Total: Literature: 1. 2. (3) Informational Texts: (2) List types of writing used to develop and convey understanding: Focus on Arguments: 3. 4. (5) (6) Writing to convey experiences: Integrate knowledge from sources when composing: Cite Evidence (RL/RI.6.1) Analyze Content (RL/RI.6.2-9, SL.6.2-3) Sue’s version of the same … Turn to page in your packet. This is a great checklist to ask ourselves – How are we doing? This can also be found on the “N Drive, Staff, Common Core” for each separate grade level.

111 K-2 3-12 Publishers’ Criteria
This is a resource that the Common Core writers shared with publishers … This is what textbooks, other resources, must include to meet the Common Core! The details can also be found under N Drive, Staff Folder, N Drive. Publishers Criteria REV for Literacy for Grades K-2 Publishers Criteria REV for Literacy for Grades 3-12 K-2 3-12

112 Involving parents is critical in building support for the new standards. The National PTA organization has provided brochures that describe the type of learning inherent in the standards. Available in both English and Spanish, consider using these brochures at open houses, parent-teacher conferences and other opportunities to enlist parent cooperation and understanding in implementing the standards.

113 Application to Students with Disabilities
Resources for Special Education

114 New York, Rhode Island and Massachusetts developed a quality review rubric to assess the quality of lessons and units developed to address the Common Core.

115 Tri-State Quality Review Rubric:
The Tri-State Quality Rubric provides a checklist for the standards (focusing on the shifts!) as well as the alignment of instruction and classroom assessment. Consider using the rubric to have PLC’s or teams of teachers review their own units or those that are already created. Tri-State Quality Review Rubric:

116 This will take TIME… This will take time … but it is important work to prepare our students for college and careers! There is not time to wait .. What must we do to step it up?

117 paralyzed into inaction!
Don’t be paralyzed into inaction! It is crucial that we not be paralyzed by the magnitude of the task before us.

118 Collaboration is Key! Collaboration among teachers, administrators – and even parents and students – will be essential to the success of our implementation efforts. Image licensed under CC with attribution

119 Desired State: CCR Current Status Checkpoint
If the “desired state” is for students to be college and career ready, we need to first look at what is happening in curriculum and instruction and then develop checkpoints along the way to assess whether or not we are still moving in the direction we desire. Current Status

120 GAP ANALYSIS PROCESS Define the Desired State
Gather evidence around current practice Findings from the evidence – across sources Conclusions about gaps and congruencies Recommendations for future action GAP ANALYSIS PROCESS The gap analysis process is much like taking a journey / vacation. You first define the desired state. For the Common Core, the desire state is that all students will be college and career ready. Next, you gather evidence about current practice – ideally from several sources. As you process that evidence, you will determine the findings – what can you say – without judgment – about what is happening. The findings then help you determine what conclusions can be drawn about gaps and congruencies between what is happening right now and what you want to have – the desired state. Lastly, you determine the future actions you will need to take to bridge or eliminate the gaps and to keep what is already meeting your desired state. Sue Z. Beers, 2012

121 Putting the Pieces Together to Move Forward: College & Career Ready for All!
We Have To Move All Students Forward: College & Career Ready for All!

122 2 Reasons to Change 1. Dissatisfaction with how things are
To encourage others to “step outside of their comfort zone” and take a risk by changing to a new way of doing business, we need to give them a reason to change. We can help them get ready to take the risk by either showing them how bad things are now – and helping them to believe in that data – or we can help them see a better way. Let’s make an analogy to home improvement… One day I walk into my living room and I notice how shabby the couch has become. I hadn’t noticed that before and now I want to invest the time and energy into buying a new couch. Once I replace the couch, I notice how the walls need to be painted or the carpet needs to be replaced – and it goes on and on. We have to START with wanting the change something because we aren’t happy with the current condition. Another way to initiate change is to see something better. I am browsing through a home magazine and see a room I really love. It gives me the incentive to invest the time and resources in redecorating the room. How can we use one of these two reasons to change to give stakeholders the impetus for change? 2. See something better that you want Sue Z. Beers, 2012

123 Beware Roadblocks!!! FEAR Sabotage Lack of Vision
Lack of Understanding FEAR Lack of Vision The main obstacle to change is fear. And fear is fueled by lack of understanding, incorrect information, lack of vision and ultimately – sabotage. As we continue to move forward, take into consideration how you can eliminate or reduce these roadblocks .. And continue to think about the why … with the why being preparing our students for future careers and college! Incorrect Information Sabotage

124 The Implementation Dip…
NEW Way OLD Way A phenomenon that is common to change efforts and that must be considered is that we are generally NOT better at doing something new than we were at doing something the old way. If we “continue to do what we’ve always done, then we’ll always get what we’ve always got.” So even when we convince others to step out and try something new, they may not feel like they were as successful with the new way as they were with what they had been doing. Since it takes practices before we become successful with new ways of doing business, those implementers need to be supported and encouraged as it seems like things are getting worse instead of better. Eventually, as they get skill and develop transfer, they will be able to establish a “new way” that is more successful than in the past. (Note: I use the analogy of learning a new golf swing to exemplify the implementation dip).

125 To make effective change…
…we need to understand The people we are asking to change The change we want The educational process In summary, as we plan for effective change – in this case implementing the CCSS – we need to understand the people, the change and the process that we will use.

126 MONITORING PROGRESS What experiences are our students actually having?
Are we making a difference?

127 EVIDENCE WALKS: Snapshots of Implementation
PLC Teams Walkthroughs Green Flags / Red Flags How are you working with your team to be sure that you are paying attention to the Green Flags/Red Flags each day of your instruction?

128 Good data tells us if we are on the right track…
Yes, good data tells us if we are on the right track …

129 Standards and Data-Driven
CCSS Configuration Map for Transitional Dialogue: Levels of Implementation 1 Standards Awareness 3 Standards-Based 5 Standards and Data-Driven Understanding the standards is a great beginning. To fully implement the Common Core we have to move from awareness to being standards-based (meaning what we do flows from the standards) to being standards and data-driven. So what does that look like? (next slide)

130 You might use this chart to determine where our school or district is at relative to its use of the standards

131 Data Driven Instruction
Data Driven Culture Assessments Analysis Action We will just keep moving forward!

132 “Core Idea: Assessments are not the end of the teaching and learning process, they’re the starting point.” “By being the starting point, interim assessments have the ability to create what Kim Marshall terms the ‘ripple effect’: they influence every component of the teaching process.” Unit Planning Teaching On-the-Spot Assessments Principal Interventions Interim Assessments Data Analysis Spend a few minutes absorbing this image and prepare to teach it to someone else. Follow-Up Summative Assessments

133 Don’t forget FORMATIVE assessment!
Yes, Formative Assessments are so important! Don’t forget FORMATIVE assessment!

134 Stop and Share… What data do you have that tells you if your students are making progress? What data do you have that tells you if your students are making progress?

135 Leadership… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hO8MwBZl-Vc
Great video on leadership and being a follower … and working together! What does this mean to you?

136 Everyone has a part! District Admin Teachers Principals
What is your part?

137 As a Team: Identify the most important KEY ELEMENTS already in place that will help your school / district implement the Common Core. Identify your GREATEST NEEDS in moving forward. Define the FIRST STEPS you will undertake in the coming school year. Identify the THREE MOST IMPORTANT RESOURCES OR TOOLS you will use in leading the implementation to the Common Core! What are your reflections to the points outlined? Identify the most important KEY ELEMENTS already in place that will help your school / district implement the Common Core. Identify your GREATEST NEEDS in moving forward. Define the FIRST STEPS you will undertake this year. Identify the THREE MOST IMPORTANT RESOURCES OR TOOLS you will use in leading the implementation to the Common Core!

138 As a Team: Identify the most important KEY ELEMENTS already in place that will help your school / district implement the Common Core. Identify your GREATEST NEEDS in moving forward. Define the FIRST STEPS you will undertake in the coming school year. Identify the THREE MOST IMPORTANT RESOURCES OR TOOLS you will use in leading the implementation to the Common Core! What are your reflections to the points outlined? Identify the most important KEY ELEMENTS already in place that will help your school / district implement the Common Core. Identify your GREATEST NEEDS in moving forward. Define the FIRST STEPS you will undertake this year. Identify the THREE MOST IMPORTANT RESOURCES OR TOOLS you will use in leading the implementation to the Common Core!

139 You will then move on to Step 5 and 6.
Complete the Reflection Forms Found On Pages 11 and 12 of your packet. (4A, 4B) You will then move on to Step 5 and 6. Step 5: You will look at the some of the resources available on the N Drive – Step 6: You will then begin to work with the standards for your grade level and/or subject area. Step 6A: Exploratory Teachers, HS Social Studies, HS Science … See directions for your work. Complete the Reflection Forms Found On Pages 11 and 12 of your packet. (4A, 4B) You will then move on to Step 5 and 6. Step 5: You will look at some of the resources available on the N Drive – Step 6: You will then begin to work with the standards for your grade level and/or subject area. Step 6A: Exploratory Teachers, HS Social Studies, HS Science … See directions for your work.

140 Common Core State Standards
. So as we end, there are big changes that are here and are still coming … We must be prepared to help our students be ready for careers and college! New Generation State Assessments


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