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Northern Adelaide Region Comprehension Strategy Module 1: Introduction Julie Fullgrabe, Regional Curriculum Consultant Debbie Draper, Regional Curriculum.

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Presentation on theme: "Northern Adelaide Region Comprehension Strategy Module 1: Introduction Julie Fullgrabe, Regional Curriculum Consultant Debbie Draper, Regional Curriculum."— Presentation transcript:

1 Northern Adelaide Region Comprehension Strategy Module 1: Introduction Julie Fullgrabe, Regional Curriculum Consultant Debbie Draper, Regional Curriculum Consultant Peta Gad, Regional Curriculum Consultant

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3 Overview NAR DIAf Improvement Cycle Standards and NAPLaN Big Six & Comprehension Strategies Morning Tea Gradual Release of Responsibility / TfEL Lunch Professional Learning Communities

4 How does the Facilitator Support Model work? Schools identify and nominate teachers / leaders to be supported as facilitators through a course delivered by regional personnel. This enables the facilitators to tailor professional learning for their colleagues at school and contribute to whole school approaches to comprehension improvement through a professional learning community approach. The Facilitator Support course consists of a series of modules that can be accessed dependent on site needs. How do we know if it is working?

5 https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FSMcapacitymatrix

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7 http://www.decd.sa.gov.au/northernadelaide/pages/comp/

8 Standards: NAR reading standards What are the Targets set against the Standards for this school? Self Review: What is the reading comprehension level for each student in your school? How do you know? Documented Evidence of a whole of school agreement about data collection and analysis for each student (RR, PAT-R, NAPLAN) That you know this is happening consistently in all classrooms Improvement Planning: What do you need to do in your programming and planning? Documented Evidence: Scope and sequence for “Big 6” in Pre – 2, and Yr 3 - 7 Whole of school diagnostic assessment plan Use of quality pedagogical framework eg Tefl Focussed discussions using data and evidence within PLC’s & performance meetings PD to build knowledge and skills of teachers Intervention & Support: What will you do to ensure success for each student? Documented Evidence of a whole of school agreement about intervention & support. How is this monitored, how often, by whom, who is the leader? Performance Reporting: How do you report reading comprehension achievement to students, parents & NAR? Evidence of distance travelled in one page report to ARD/RD against stated Targets, end Term 4 & via Annual Report

9 Standards: NAR Reading Standards, NAPLAN Self Review: What is the reading comprehension level for each student in Yr 8 and 9? How do you know? Documented Evidence of - diagnostic assessments for each student & improvement for each student or groups of students How Yr 7 to 8 Transition informs Year 8 Maths, Science and English curriculum design & assessment Short term learning goals set for each student to achieve and improve Improvement Planning: What do you need to do in your programming and planning? Documented Evidence of how the Year 7 NAPLAN data is analysed and informs subject planning and program development. What & how subject teachers are differentiating learning? How individual student learning goals are developed and monitored within each subject? How do curriculum options support post school pathways? Intervention & Support: What will you do to ensure success for each student? Documented Evidence of how students are case managed? How are ILP’s and NEP’s students case managed? How and who monitors achievement progress? Who leads this? Performance Reporting: How do you report Reading Comprehension achievement to each student, parents & to the whole of your school? Documented Evidence that student progress data informs school progress

10 Standards: “C” grade or better in: Maths, English, PLP, Research Project SACE Completion, School Based Apprenticeships, TER Self Review: What is the level of achievement target for each student in each subject in your senior school? How do you know? Documented Evidence of Term Grades for each subject and whether each student is on track or has subject work “pending” Improvement Planning: What do you need to do in your programming and planning? Documented Evidence of how individual student learning goals are developed and monitored within each subject? How do curriculum options support post school pathways? Intervention & Support: What will you do to ensure success for each student? Documented Evidence of how students are case managed? How are ILP’s and NEP’s students case managed? How and who monitors achievement progress? Who leads this? Performance Reporting: How do you report achievement to each student, parents & NAR? Documented Evidence of how this happens and how often ?

11 What are the targets set against the standards? Reading Levels NAPLaN bands SACE – C grade + TER, successful pathways

12 Standards Running Records YEARReceptionYr 1Yr 2 Level10 or above20 or above26 or above NAPLAN Reading YEARYr 3Yr 5Yr 7Yr 9 Proficiency Band 4 or above 6 or above 7 or above 8 or above

13 Standards Student Achievement Running Records – how are they analysed to determine levels of comprehension? NAPLaN proficiency bands – what does this mean in terms of reading / comprehension? What about reading skills that are needed for independent comprehension – oral language, alphabet knowledge, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary and fluency? What comprehension strategies do we expect our students to use and how do we know if they can?

14 Standards Organisational Conditions What does this mean for teacher practice? What does this mean for leadership practice? What does this mean for site practice?

15 Alignment Doesn’t mean do everything at once Could mean focus on one skill to start with e.g. Inferencing What does this look like at each year level? - Check Australian Curriculum / SACSA / SACE What does it look like in all learning areas? How might we teach it? -Check TfEL -Gradual Release of Responsibility / Apprenticeship Model -Refer to Comprehension Resources

16 DRAFT STATEMENT The key leverage points for sites that have been successful in achieving significant improvement in their reading and comprehension outcomes for students  Shared and agreed purpose that drives a commitment to improved literacy achievement with high expectations for all students  Collective ownership of a whole school literacy plan aligned with the NAR Improvement Cycle  Agreements for what is taught, how it is taught and when it is taught that brings coherence and consistency to the school’s reading programs  Shared understanding of how students learn to read and the processes & strategies students require to successfully comprehend texts  Consistent and responsive pedagogical practices that teach students how to read and comprehend texts  Formative and summative assessment processes aligned to the region’s comprehension targets, which are used to inform teaching practice and site improvement.  Targeted professional learning that includes opportunities for staff to learn about, discuss and understand, observe and analyse approaches to the teaching, learning and assessment of reading.

17 See handouts

18 The Gradual Release of Responsibility

19 Frayer Model

20 This is what sorry looks like…

21 This is what tired looks like…

22 This is what comprehension looks like…

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26 http://dww.ed.gov/Reading-Comprehension/Teach-Comprehension-Strategies/learn/?T_ID=36&P_ID=97&intID=2206&t=1#learn

27 http://dww.ed.gov/Reading-Comprehension/Teach-Comprehension-Strategies/see/index.cfm?T_ID=36&P_ID=97&c1=2447&c2=2207&c3=2205

28 The Power of Modelling Why? – Humans mimic or imitate – Mirror neurons – Students need examples of the type of thinking required – Facilitates the use of academic language

29 Why Do We Model? TRANSPARENCY Students are invited into the mind of someone who can already solve the problem or use the skill/strategy.

30 Modelling Think-Alouds: Definition A think-aloud of reading is creating a record, either through writing or talking aloud, of the strategic decision-making and interpretative processes of going through a text, reporting everything the reader is aware of noticing, doing, seeing, feeling, asking, and understanding as she reads. A think-aloud involves talking about the reading strategies you are using and the content of the piece that you are reading. Wilhelm (2001). Improving Comprehension through Think-Aloud Strategies, p. 19.

31 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0ZHimY5YZo&list=PL5178787DB725559D&index=37&feature=plpp_video

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34 Scaffolding: Gradual Release of Responsibility Explicit & Systematic Initial Instruction Modelling & Think Alouds Prompts Student Practice with Teacher Guidance Independent Practice StudentMastery Student Attentiveness and Participation Guided Practice with Corrective Feedback Concept Knowledge, Skills & Strategies Teacher Responsibility Application of new skills and strategies Formative Assessment Reading Centres

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38 http://stt-sharedreading.wikispaces.com/file/view/WEB+VERSION+Read+On+Optimised.pdf

39 Gradual Release of Responsibility 02:12

40 Non Examples?

41 In some classrooms … TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson “I do it” Independent “You do it alone”

42 And in some classrooms … TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson “I do it” Independent “You do it alone” “We do it”

43 What works… TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson I do it Independent You do it alone We do it You do it together Guided Collaborative

44 What also works… TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson I do it Independent You do it alone We do it You do it together Guided Collaborative

45 What also works… TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson I do it Independent You do it alone We do it You do it together Guided Collaborative

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47 Modelled: Model the Comprehension Strategies using Read Aloud / Think Aloud - Making connections - Questioning - Inferring - Visualising - Determining Importance - Summarising - Synthesising Consider - Fluency - Vocabulary

48 Shared: Model, with student input and interaction, the Comprehension Strategies using Read Aloud / Think Aloud - Make them explicit - Create visual supports e.g. Anchor Charts, role cards

49 Guided: Model the reading and comprehension strategies in guided reading Provide explicit feedback to students about their use of the strategies

50 Independent: Provide opportunities for independent use of the strategies through Reciprocal Reading Literature Circles 5 R Cross age tutoring Independent reading with response activities

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52 Independent Use of Strategies Routines are settings where students can apply the strategies that have “become so ingrained that they can be used successfully on a regular basis.” (McLaughlin, 2003) Before students get to this level they must clearly understand the purpose of the routines, why they are taking part in them and exactly how they are to be conducted. These routines and their implementation should be fully scaffolded by the teacher.

53 Guided Reading 01:53

54 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMctcIOWVHw&feature=related

55 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mZ9nqYvU1k

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57 Frayer Model

58 Independent Learning Module https://sites.google.com/a/mcoeapps.org/grr/home Video about using GRR with prepositions http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUawmCJX6zo&feature=related Video about the theory behind GRR http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2kthBiYHF4&feature=related

59 Professional Learning Communities

60 What is the one behaviour that most frustrates you about working with others in a team?

61 Team Norms 1.

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64 See handout

65 Solution Tree Rick DuFour on Groups vs Teams 03:49 http://www.allthingsplc.info/

66 Developing Team Norms

67 Some PLC Stories

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69 Solution Tree: Becky DuFour 02:23

70 1.Embrace learning as our fundamental purpose 2.Build a collaborative culture 3.Use results to drive our effort

71 Students were surveyed

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73 PerceptionStrategies usedActivities enjoyedActivities not enjoyed At Spelling I am Really good – I can spell lots of words = 3 Pretty good for my age = 8 Average = 7 I have a bit of trouble with spelling = 2 I really struggle with spelling = 1  Sound it out (11)  Write it out (5)  Spell it in my head (4)  Ask a friend (4)  Have a guess / try (4)  Break up the word / syllables (3)  Dictionary (3)  Write it down different ways & choose best (2)  Say it to myself (2)  I picture it in my mind  LSCWC  Step word  Think of other words like it  Do activities with the words and remember it  Find a word (6)  Dictionary meaning (4)  Word cricket (4)  Crossword (3)  Don’t enjoy any (3)  Step words (3)  Syllables (3)  Making props (2)  Word snakes (2)  Alphabetical order  Antonyms  Chain words  Colour words  Eyes closed words  Illustrations  Learning my list words  Making an ad with them  Sentences  Spelling chains  Sport spelling  Synonyms  Word snakes  Write words on white board  Writing stories  Dictionary meanings (11)  Synonyms (4)  All of them (4)  Antonyms (3)  Chain words (3)  Cross words (2)  None (2)  Sentences (2)  Shape words (2)  Speed typing  Step words (2)  Acrostic poems  TV ads  Word cricket

74 Differentiated Spelling Diagnose (skills, engagement, strategies) Differentiate (lists, strategies, activities) Engage (technology, hands-on, games, MI strategies)

75 http://prezi.com/awchwri4tn23/present/?auth_key=usx8ke2&follow=vouyykrrb20m

76 Your PLC Stories

77 Inquiry Cycle

78 What? When? Who? How? Where? Why?

79 snow car

80 for PLC’s 4 Key Questions for PLC’s 1.What is it we expect them to learn? 2.How will we know when they have learned it? 3.How will we respond if they don’t learn it? 4.How will we respond if they already know it?

81 What are they expected to learn & why is it important? EY Learning Framework Australian Curriculum SACE 1 our SA reference points Aligning What and How our SA reference points What do they bring? Prior skills, knowledge and understandings? TfEL 4.1 & 4.2 2 What does the expected learning look like at this level? EY outcomes AC Achievement Standards SACE performance standards 3 How will we assess the learning? How will they demonstrate their learning? Assessment in authentic contexts TfEL 4.3 4 Design the learning plan.. Design & sequence TfEL 1.6 Referenced against domains 2-4 6 How will I engage, challenge and support their learning? TfEL D 2, 3 & 4 5 What do I want them to learn? How will I know if they got it? So what will we do to get there? TfEL Team, 2012

82 What ?

83 This element involves:  using strategies for reading and viewing texts, including using applied topic knowledge, vocabulary and visual knowledge  listening for information and to carry out tasks and participate in discussions  using strategies for comprehending spoken, written, visual and multimodal texts, including retrieving literal information and making inferences. Comprehending texts through listening, reading and viewing What ?

84 Comprehending learning area texts By the end of Year 2 students: understand and use different types of learning area texts to explore topics, gather information and make some obvious inferences By the end of Year 4 students: retrieve and understand literal information in learning area texts, and make inferences to expand and link ideas and to comprehend and interpret texts By the end of Year 6 students: understand, interpret and analyse information and ideas in learning area texts, comparing content from a range of sources and analysing similarities and differences in texts on similar topics or themes By the end of Year 8 students: understand, interpret and evaluate literal and inferential information in learning area texts, identify main ideas and supporting evidence, and analyse different perspectives and points of view By the end of Year 10 students: understand, interpret and evaluate information within and between learning area texts, combining, connecting, comparing and synthesising ideas and concepts, and identifying perspectives and evaluating supporting evidence What ?

85 Doing What Works – Unpacking Standards 6:25

86 How?

87 3. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN READING IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY CLASSROOMS Sousa defines three major differences between the developmental reading (learning to read) that students experience in primary classrooms with the expository reading (reading to learn) that students experience in secondary classrooms. 1.The first difference is in learning new vocabulary. In developmental reading, vocabulary is taught in context, meaning is clarified and words are rehearsed and practiced at a pace that most children can accomplish. In content courses, the vocabulary used in basic texts is highly specialised and technical, and often presented so quickly that students often have little time to comprehend its meaning. 2.The second difference lies in the way concepts are introduced and explored. In developmental reading, teachers present concepts that are familiar, and they cover them at a pace that is appropriate for most students. In content courses, teachers present concepts that are unfamiliar and complex, usually at a rapid pace because there is so much to cover. 3.The third is in the specialised type of reading that is needed for some courses, such as the ability to read charts, tables, graphs, globes and technical instruments. Sousa, D. (2006), pp. 175 - 176.

88 How?What?

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90 http://dww.ed.gov/Adolescent-Literacy/topic/index.cfm?T_ID=23 What?How?

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93 Doing What Works - Articulation Meetings 4:04

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95 We know students benefit when teachers work collaboratively toward the common goal of high levels of learning for all. Specifically, students benefit when teams of teachers focus on clarifying what kids should know and be able to do, create common formative assessments, design systematic pyramids of intervention, and provide more time and support to those students who don’t learn in the course of initial instruction. Finding answers to these critical questions is the work of an effective teacher team.

96 Genre in Secondary Schools Designed to build facilitator capacity for a school-based literacy leader around purposes, structures and language features of different written texts. Offered separately to 6/7 and secondary facilitators. Genre Mapping Designed to support the whole school literacy improvement plan through the development of a school genre map. Genre maps are integral to the design of teaching and learning programs across the school. Genre Mapping is offered by the region as a facilitator support module. Years 3-12 - Primary and Secondary are offered separately Middle Years Literacy Project Focus on Aboriginal Learners Exposition: Literacy requirements & assessment Tactical Teaching: How to help students use reading processes, How to make reading strategies visible, How to build text from knowledge Facilitator Support Modules Introduction to NAR comprehension priority & improvement cycle, Fluency & Automaticity, Monitoring Comprehension, Phonics to Etymology, Vocabulary, Making Connections, Questioning, Inferencing, Visualising & Visual Texts, Non-Fiction Comprehension Strategies, Mathematics & Comprehension, Digital Comprehension, Structures and Processes Running Records Focussing on Literacy Improvement (Deslea Konza) The Big Six / Waves of Intervention Uni-SA modules Topics TBA Talking Literacies Emergent Literacy, Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, Making Meaning PreR123456789101112

97 https://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/NAR-Comprehension-Network/347996428544253 http://www.decd.sa.gov.au/northernadelaide/pages/comp/ http://www.decd.sa.gov.au/northernadelaide/pages/fsm/facilitatorsupport/


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