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The Public Schools Amendment Act Appropriate Educational Programming (formerly Bill 13)

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Presentation on theme: "The Public Schools Amendment Act Appropriate Educational Programming (formerly Bill 13)"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Public Schools Amendment Act Appropriate Educational Programming (formerly Bill 13)

2 Equality The Charter was proclaimed in Section 15 (equality rights) affects the delivery of educational services. Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.

3 The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) 1987: The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) authorized the Manitoba Human Rights Commission to mediate/investigate discrimination complaints based on ancestry age ethnic background/origin religion/creed/religious belief, religious association/activity nationality or national origin sex gender-determined characteristics sexual orientation marital/family status source of income political belief, political association or activity physical or mental disability

4 Duty to Accommodate Disability The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, The Human Rights Code (Manitoba) and the resulting court cases have established a duty to accommodate disability. Thus, in education there is a duty to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities to allow them to access educational services equally, unless to do so would cause undue hardship. Undue hardship: The measures to accommodate special needs will be reasonable and required unless they cause undue hardship due to cost, risk to safety, impact on others or other factors.

5 Principles of Reasonable Accommodation Reasonable Accommodation: The school’s obligation to address special needs of students where these needs stem from the protected characteristics specified in The Human Rights Code (Manitoba), such as physical or mental disability, and affect the individual’s ability to access educational/school services or facilities. Under the Code, the measures to accommodate special needs will be reasonable and therefore required unless they give rise to undue hardship due to cost, risk of safety, impact on others, or other factors.

6 Philosophy of Inclusion Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth’s Philosophy of Inclusion provides the starting point and foundation for development of the regulations. The Philosophy of Inclusion goes beyond the idea of physical location and incorporates basic values and a belief system that promotes participation, belonging and interaction.

7 Appropriate Educational Programming June 10, 2004: Bill 13, An Amendment to the Public Schools Act (Appropriate Educational Programming) received concurrence and Royal Assent in the Manitoba Legislature. October 28, 2005: the Amendment to the Public Schools Act and supporting Regulations were proclaimed.

8 Public Schools Amendment Act (Appropriate Educational Programming) Amends Section 41(1.1) of the Public Schools Act as follows: The minister may make regulations respecting appropriate educational programming to be provided by school boards under clause (1)(a.1), including, but not limited to, establishing programming standards respecting resources and other support services to be provided by school boards; a dispute resolution process to be followed if there is a disagreement about the appropriateness of the educational programming being provided to a pupil by the school board.

9 Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth is committed to fostering inclusion for all people. Inclusion is a way of thinking and acting that allows every individual to feel accepted, valued and safe. An inclusive community consciously evolves to meet the changing needs of its members. Through recognition and support, an inclusive community provides meaningful involvement and equal access to the benefits of citizenship. In Manitoba we embrace inclusion as a means of enhancing the well-being of every member of the community. By working together, we strengthen our capacity to provide the foundation for a richer future for all of us.

10 Legislative Terminology Statutes/Legislation The Public Schools Amendment Act (Appropriate Educational Programming) (formerly Bill 13) Regulations Appropriate Educational Programming Regulation 155/2005 Provisions Regulation 156/2005 Minister’s Letters/Directives Letter sent out affirming that all students have the right to the same length of school day Policies/Protocols Guidelines for Early Transition to School for Children with Special Needs

11 Legislative Terminology (continued) Standards Appropriate Educational Programming: Standards for Student Services Guidelines Manitoba Pupil File Guidelines, Revised November 2004 Support Documents Working Together: A Guide to Positive Problem Solving for Schools, Families, and Communities Appropriate Educational Programming in Manitoba: A Formal Dispute Resolution Process

12 Appropriate Educational Programming Appropriate educational programming is a collaborative school-family-community process where school communities create learning environments and provide resources and services that are responsive to the life-long learning, social and emotional needs of all students.

13 Part 1: Introductory Provisions Definitions 1The following definitions apply in this regulation   “Act” means The Public Schools Act   “adaptation” means a change in the teaching process, materials, assignments or pupil products to assist a pupil to achieve the expected learning outcomes   “curriculum” means the curriculum prescribed or approved by the minister 

14 Part 1: Introductory Provisions (continued) “deputy minister” means the deputy minister of the Department of Education, Citizenship and Youth “differentiated instruction” means a method of instruction or assessment that alters the presentation of the curriculum for the purpose of responding to the learning diversity, interests and strengths of pupils “expected learning outcomes” means the learning outcomes consistent with the curriculum

15 Part 1: Introductory Provisions (continued) “minister” means the minister responsible for the administration of the Act “parent” includes a legal guardian “pupil file” has the same meaning as in section 42.2 of the Act

16 Part 2: Appropriate Education General obligation 2(1)The appropriate educational programming that a school board must provide is the curriculum 2(2)A school board must ensure that, as far as reasonably practicable, appropriate educational programming is available to a pupil in a regular class of his or her peers at (a)the school whose catchment area includes his or her residence; or (b)another school that provides the program, as designated by the board, that the pupil is to be enrolled in, if the school described in clause (a) does not provide that program.

17 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) School-related activities 3A school board must ensure that school ‑ related activities such as assemblies, sports days and field trips reasonably accommodate the needs of all students.

18 Discussion Topic #1 What are the key areas that need to be examined when planning a school- related activity for a student who requires a wheelchair?

19 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) Assessment 4(1)A principal must ensure a pupil is assessed as soon as reasonably practicable if he or she is having difficulty meeting the expected learning outcomes. 4(2)A principal must ensure a pupil is referred for a specialized assessment if the pupil's teacher and resource teacher, guidance counsellor or other applicable in-school personnel are (a)unable to assess why the pupil is having difficulty meeting those outcomes; or (b)of the opinion that differentiated instruction and adaptations are insufficient to assist the pupil in meeting those outcomes.

20 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 4(3)A principal must ensure that the pupil's parent is informed before the pupil is referred for a specialized assessment, and no interviewing or testing as part of the assessment may occur without the parent's consent. 4(4)A specialized assessment must be (a)coordinated by a person who has been designated by the school board or, if the board has not designated such a person, by the principal; and (b)conducted by one or more qualified practitioners, as designated by the person coordinating the assessment, who may, if relevant in the circumstances, take into account reports and other information obtained (i)from the pupil’s pupil file, or (ii)from or with the consent of the pupil’s parent.

21 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 4(5)A specialized assessment must identify the following, as applicable: (a)other methods of differentiated instruction and adaptations that can be used to assist the pupil in meeting the expected learning outcomes, if it is determined that such methods or adaptations will be sufficient to assist the pupil in meeting those outcomes; (b)if it is determined that differentiated instruction and adaptations will be insufficient to assist the pupil in meeting the expected learning outcomes, what the pupil requires to meet or approximate i)the expected learning outcomes, or ii)the learning outcomes the pupil can reasonably be expected to achieve.

22 Discussion Topic #2 How would you work with a parent who refuses to agree to a specialized assessment? How can you address the needs of the student?

23 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) Individual Education Plans 5(1)A principal must ensure that an individual education plan is prepared for a pupil who has requirements identified under clause 4(5)(b). The plan must identify (a)how the pupil’s requirements for meeting or approximating the expected learning outcomes are to be addressed, where it is reasonable to expect the pupil to meet or approximate those outcomes; or (b)where it is not reasonable to expect the pupil to meet or approximate the expected learning outcomes, (i)the learning outcomes the pupil can reasonably be expected to meet, and (ii)how the pupil’s requirements for meeting those learning outcomes are to be addressed.

24 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 5(2)The principal must ensure that a pupil's individual education plan (a)is prepared with the assistance of the pupil's teacher and other in ‑ school personnel, as directed by the principal; (b)takes into account a pupil's behavioural or health care needs, if any; (c)is consistent with provincial protocols respecting a pupil's transition to and from school; and (d)is updated annually or sooner if required by a change in a pupil's behaviour or needs.

25 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 5(3)The principal must ensure that the pupil's parents, and the pupil if appropriate, are given opportunity to (a)participate in preparing and updating the pupil's plan; and (b)be accompanied and assisted by a person of their choosing when doing so. 5(4)The content of a pupil's individual education plan may be inconsistent with the requirements of section 2. In that case, the requirements of section 2 do not apply to the pupil.

26 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) Transition into school 6(1)In this section, "eligible person" means a person who (a)is eligible to be enrolled as a pupil but who has not yet begun attending school; or will be transferring into a school.

27 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 6(2)When differentiated instruction methods and adaptations are likely to be insufficient to assist an eligible person in meeting the expected learning outcomes, (a)the principal must ensure that the person is referred for a specialized assessment; and (b)if required, the principal must ensure that an individual education plan is prepared for the person; and sections 4 and 5 apply, with necessary changes, to the assessment and plan to be done under this section.

28 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) Educational programming not to be unduly delayed 7(1)A school board must ensure that a pupil is not denied educational programming in the following circumstances: (a)for more than 14 days after the pupil seeks to be enrolled in a school within the division or district, regardless of whether or not that school has received the pupil's pupil file; or (b)pending (i)the conduct of any assessment, or (ii)the preparation of an individual education plan for the pupil.

29 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) 7(2)A school board’s obligation to provide educational programming under clause (1)(a) does not limit or restrict it from taking reasonable steps to address any significant risks to safety which a pupil may present to himself or herself, or to others.

30 Discussion Topic #3 What steps can you and your staff take to ensure parents and students are given the opportunity to participate in the development and review of an IEP?

31 Part 2: Appropriate Education (continued) Other assessments and reports not limited 8An assessment, including a specialized assessment, of a pupil conducted under this Part does not limit or restrict a school board's obligation to ensure that: (a)any other required assessment of the pupil is carried out; and (b)the pupil's progress is evaluated and progress reports are provided to parents.

32 Part 3: Dispute Resolution Appointment of review coordinator 9The minister must appoint a person as the review coordinator.

33 Part 3: Dispute Resolution (continued) Complaint may be made to the review coordinator 10(1)A parent of a pupil, or a pupil who is over the age of 18, may complain to the review coordinator about the appropriateness of the following, as identified in the pupil’s individual education plan: (a)how the pupil’s programming requirements for meeting or approximating the expected learning outcomes, or the outcomes the pupil can reasonably be expected to meet are addressed; (b)where a pupil is placed in relation to his or her receiving educational programming.

34 Part 3: Dispute Resolution (continued) 10(2)A complaint must be in writing and must specify (a)the complainant's name and address; (b)the name of the pupil, where the complaint is made by the pupil's parent; and (c) the reason or reasons why the complaint is made.

35 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment 1.The Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 468/88R, is amended by this regulation.

36 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) 2.Subsection 29(3) is replaced with the following: 29(3)The principal must provide the pupil file of a pupil who has transferred to another school to that school within one week of the school requesting it. 29(4)In subsection 3, “pupil file” has the same meaning as in section 42.2 of The Public Schools Act 3.The centered heading before section 40.3 is replaced with “SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION”

37 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) 4.The following is added after section 40.9: Statistics re suspensions 40.9Every principal must (a)develop categories of the reasons for which a pupil may be suspended; and (b)ensure that (i)each suspension is accordingly categorized, and (ii)for each category, the total number of pupils suspended and the duration of suspensions are tabulated.

38 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) Where suspension exceeds five days 40.10A principal must ensure that educational programming is available to a pupil who has been suspended from school for more than five days.

39 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) Alternative programming 40.11Despite being expelled, a school board must ensure that educational programming is made available to a person under the age of 16 who is otherwise entitled to attend a school in the division or district, as provided in section 259 of The Public Schools Act.

40 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) Special needs of pupil to be taken into account 40.12Every teacher, principal, superintendent and school board must ensure a pupil’s special needs, if any, are taken into account when deciding whether to suspend or expel or otherwise discipline the pupil.

41 Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation, amendment (continued) Coming into force 5.This regulation comes into force on the same day that The Public Schools Amendment Act (Appropriate Educational Programming), S.M. 2004, c.9, comes into force October 28, 2005.

42 Discussion Topic #4 What are the considerations an administrator should think about when disciplining a child with a known disability? Provide suggestions for how the child’s disability can be considered in addressing the behaviour issue.

43 Core Values and Beliefs of Our Model of Inclusion All students can learn in different ways and at different rates. All students have individual abilities and needs. All students want to feel they belong and are valued. All students have the right to benefit from their education. All students come from diverse backgrounds and want their differences respected. Students learn in different places and locations. All students have the right to appropriate educational programming.

44 Core Values and Beliefs (continued) The provincial curriculum is the starting point for programming. Parents and students must be involved in the planning process. Collaboration between home, school and community is imperative. The Individual Education Plan is the basis for decision-making for students with special needs. The number of individuals involved in a student’s planning will increase as the complexity of the needs increase.


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