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12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being REMEMBER: NAs can help residents feel at home.

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Presentation on theme: "12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being REMEMBER: NAs can help residents feel at home."— Presentation transcript:

1 12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being REMEMBER: NAs can help residents feel at home and possibly even improve their health by maintaining a clean and comfortable environment.

2 12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being NAs should remember the following guidelines for promoting comfort in the resident’s unit: Help keep the noise level low. Don’t bang equipment or meal trays. Keep voice low. Answer phones and call lights promptly. Close doors when asked to do so. Turn off televisions when not in use.

3 12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being Guidelines for promoting comfort in the resident’s unit (cont’d): Control odors. Clean up promptly after incontinence. Change incontinence briefs promptly and dispose of them properly. Empty and clean bedpans, urinals, commodes, and emesis basins promptly. Change soiled linens and clothing as soon as possible. Give regular oral care and personal care.

4 12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being Guidelines for promoting comfort in the resident’s unit (cont’d): Help residents feel comfortable. OBRA requires facilities maintain temperature range of 71-81°F. Layer clothing and bed covers. Keep residents away from drafts. Offer blankets to residents in wheelchairs. Keep residents covered while giving personal care.

5 12 The Resident’s Unit 1. Explain why a comfortable environment is important for the resident’s well-being Guidelines for promoting comfort in the resident’s unit (cont’d): Provide appropriate lighting and keep lighting controls within resident’s reach. Report resident complaints about food to the nurse. Be aware that caffeine may need to be decreased to promote better rest. Listen to residents’ concerns and provide emotional support. Report to nurse if resident seems to need more assistance than you can give.

6 12 The Resident’s Unit 2. Describe a standard resident unit REMEMBER: A resident’s room is her home. Residents’ living spaces and their personal possessions must be respected.

7 12 The Resident’s Unit 2. Describe a standard resident unit The following equipment is usually found in a resident’s unit: Bed Bedside stand (which may contain the following items): Urinal/bedpan Wash basin Emesis basin Soap dish and soap Bath blanket Toilet paper Personal hygiene items Overbed table

8 12 The Resident’s Unit 2. Describe a standard resident unit Equipment usually found in a resident’s unit (cont’d): Chair Bath basin Call light Privacy curtain

9 12 The Resident’s Unit 2. Describe a standard resident unit REMEMBER: Soiled items, bedpans, and urinals should never be placed on the overbed table.

10 12 The Resident’s Unit 2. Describe a standard resident unit REMEMBER: Privacy curtains should be pulled every time NAs give care.

11 12 The Resident’s Unit 3. Discuss how to care for and clean unit equipment REMEMBER: Infection prevention measures must be followed when cleaning a resident’s unit.

12 12 The Resident’s Unit 3. Discuss how to care for and clean unit equipment Think about this question: What types of equipment in a resident’s unit will need to be cleaned after each use?

13 12 The Resident’s Unit 3. Discuss how to care for and clean unit equipment NAs should remember these guidelines for the resident’s unit: Clean the overbed table after each use. Keep call light within reach. Keep equipment clean and in good condition. Report problems with equipment to nurse or according to facility guidelines. Remove meal trays promptly, then remove crumbs and straighten linen. Change linen if it is wet, soiled, or wrinkled.

14 12 The Resident’s Unit 3. Discuss how to care for and clean unit equipment Guidelines for the resident’s unit (cont’d): Re-stock personal supplies as needed. Keep water pitchers filled. Notify housekeeping department if trash needs to be emptied. Report signs of insects or pests immediately. Do not move residents’ belongings. Clean equipment and return it to proper storage. Tidy the area.

15 12 The Resident’s Unit 4. Explain the importance of sleep and factors affecting sleep Define the following terms: circadian rhythm the 24-hour day-night cycle. insomnia inability to fall asleep or remain asleep.

16 12 The Resident’s Unit 4. Explain the importance of sleep and factors affecting sleep Lack of sleep can cause the following problems: Decreased mental function Reduced reaction time Irritability Decreased immune system function

17 12 The Resident’s Unit 4. Explain the importance of sleep and factors affecting sleep The following factors can affect sleeping patterns: Fear Stress Noise Diet Medications Illness Sharing a room with another person

18 12 The Resident’s Unit 4. Explain the importance of sleep and factors affecting sleep NAs should observe for the following when a resident is not sleeping well: Sleeping too much during the day Drinking too much caffeine Dressing in night clothes during the day Eating too late at night Refusing prescribed medications Taking new medications Having TV, radio, computer, or light on late at night Pain

19 12 The Resident’s Unit 5. Describe bedmaking guidelines and perform proper bedmaking Define the following terms: occupied bed a bed made while a person is in the bed. unoccupied bed a bed made while no person is in the bed. closed bed a bed completely made with the bedspread and blankets in place. open bed a bed made with linen folded down to the foot of the bed. surgical bed a bed made to accept residents who are returning to bed on stretchers.

20 12 The Resident’s Unit 5. Describe bedmaking guidelines and perform proper bedmaking Proper bedmaking is important for the following reasons: Damp and wrinkled sheets are uncomfortable and may keep the resident from sleeping well. Microorganisms thrive in moist, warm places, and damp, unclean bedding may cause infection or disease. Sheets that are not flat increase risk for pressure ulcers.

21 12 The Resident’s Unit 5. Describe bedmaking guidelines and perform proper bedmaking NAs should remember these guidelines for bedmaking: Keep linen wrinkle-free and tidy. Wash hands before handling clean linen. Place clean linen on clean surface, such as chair, overbed table, or bedside stand. Don gloves before removing bed linen. Look for personal items before removing linen. When removing linen, fold or roll linen so the dirtiest area is inside.

22 12 The Resident’s Unit 5. Describe bedmaking guidelines and perform proper bedmaking Guidelines for bedmaking (cont’d): Do not shake linen or clothes. Bag soiled linen at point of origin, and do not take it to other residents’ rooms. Sort soiled linen away from care areas. Place wet linen in leakproof bags. Wear gloves when handling soiled linen. Hold soiled linen away from your body. If dirty linen touches your uniform, your uniform becomes contaminated. Disposable bed protectors or pads are used for incontinent residents. Change them as soon as they are soiled or wet, and dispose of them properly.

23 Making an occupied bed Equipment: clean linen— mattress pad, fitted or flat bottom sheet, waterproof bed protector if needed, cotton draw sheet, flat top sheet, blanket(s), bath blanket, pillowcase(s), gloves 1.Identify yourself by name. Identify the resident by name. 2.Wash your hands. 3.Explain procedure to the resident. Speak clearly, slowly, and directly. Maintain face-to-face contact whenever possible.

24 Making an occupied bed 4.Provide for the resident’s privacy with curtain, screen, or door. 5.Place clean linen on clean surface within reach (e.g., bedside stand, overbed table, or chair). 6.Adjust bed to a safe working level, usually waist high. Lower head of bed. Lock bed wheels. 7.Put on gloves. 8.Loosen top linen from the end of the bed on the working side.

25 Making an occupied bed 9.Unfold bath blanket over the top sheet to cover the resident, and remove the top sheet. Keep the resident covered at all times with the bath blanket. 10.You will make the bed one side at a time. Raise side rail (if bed has them) on far side of bed. This protects the resident from falling out of the bed while you are making it. After raising side rail, go to the other side of the bed. Help resident to turn onto her side, moving away from you, toward the raised side rail.

26 Making an occupied bed 11.Loosen bottom soiled linen, mattress pad, and protector, if present, on the working side. 12.Roll bottom soiled linen toward resident, soiled side inside. Tuck it snugly against the resident’s back. 13.Place the mattress pad (if used) on the bed, attaching elastic at corners on working side.

27 Making an occupied bed 14.Place and tuck in clean bottom linen. Finish with bottom sheet free of wrinkles. If you are using a flat bottom sheet, leave enough overlap on each end to tuck under the mattress. If the sheet is only long enough to tuck in at one end, tuck it in securely at the top of the bed. Make hospital corners to keep bottom sheet wrinkle-free.

28 Making an occupied bed 15.Smooth the bottom sheet out toward the resident. Be sure there are no wrinkles in the mattress pad. Roll the extra material toward the resident. Tuck it under the resident’s body. 16.If using a waterproof bed protector, unfold it and center it on the bed. Tuck the side near you under the mattress. Smooth it out toward the resident. Tuck as you did with the sheet.

29 Making an occupied bed 17.If using a draw sheet, place it on the bed. Tuck in on your side, smooth, and tuck as you did with the other bedding. 18.Raise side rail nearest you. Go to the other side of the bed and lower the side rail on that side. Help resident turn onto clean bottom sheet. Explain that she will be rolling over a pile of linen. Protect the resident from any soiled matter on the old linens

30 Making an occupied bed 19.Loosen the soiled linen. Check for any personal items. Roll linen from head to foot of the bed. Avoid contact with your skin or clothes. Place it in a hamper or bag. Never put it on the floor or furniture. Never shake it. Soiled bed linens are full of microorganisms that should not be spread to other parts of the room.

31 Making an occupied bed 20.Pull the clean linen through as quickly as possible. Start with the mattress pad and wrap around corners. Pull and tuck in clean bottom linen just like the other side. Pull and tuck in waterproof bed protector and draw sheet if used. Finish with bottom sheet free of wrinkles. 21.Ask resident to turn onto her back. Help as needed. Keep resident covered and comfortable, with a pillow under her head. Raise the side rail.

32 Making an occupied bed 22.Unfold the top sheet. Place it over the resident and center it. Ask the resident to hold the top sheet. Slip the bath blanket or old sheet out from underneath. Put it in the hamper or bag. 23.Place a blanket over the top sheet, matching the top edges. Tuck the bottom edges of top sheet and blanket under the bottom of the mattress. Make hospital corners on each side. Loosen the top linens over the resident’s feet. This prevents pressure on the feet. At the top of the bed, fold the top sheet over the blanket about six inches.

33 Making an occupied bed 24.Remove the pillow. Do not hold it near your face. Remove the soiled pillowcase by turning it inside out. Place it in the hamper or bag. 25.Remove and discard gloves. Wash your hands.

34 Making an occupied bed 24.With one hand, grasp the clean pillowcase at the closed end. Turn it inside out over your arm. Next, using the same hand that has the pillowcase over it, grasp one narrow edge of the pillow. Pull the pillowcase over it with your free hand. Do the same for any other pillows. Place them under resident’s head with open end away from door.

35 Making an occupied bed 27.Make resident comfortable. 28.Return bed to lowest position. Leave side rails in the ordered position. Remove privacy measures. 29.Place call light within resident’s reach. 30.Take laundry bag or hamper to proper area. 31.Wash your hands. 32.Report any changes in resident to the nurse. 33.Document procedure using facility guidelines.

36 Making an unoccupied bed Equipment: clean linen— mattress pad, fitted or flat bottom sheet, waterproof bed protector if needed, blanket(s), cotton draw sheet, flat top sheet, pillowcase(s), gloves 1.Wash your hands. 2.Place clean linen on clean surface within reach (e.g., bedside stand, overbed table, or chair). 3.Adjust bed to a safe working level, usually waist high. Put bed in flattest position. Lock bed wheels. 4.Put on gloves.

37 Making an unoccupied bed 5.Loosen soiled linen. Roll soiled linen (soiled side inside) from head to foot of bed. Avoid contact with your skin or clothes. Place it in a hamper or bag. Do not put it on the floor or furniture. 6.Remove and discard gloves. Wash your hands. 7.Remake the bed. Start with the mattress pad and wrap around corners. Place bottom sheet, tucking under mattress. Make hospital corners to keep the bottom sheet wrinkle-free. Put on waterproof bed protector and draw sheet, if used, smooth, and tuck under sides of bed.

38 Making an unoccupied bed 8.Place top sheet and blanket over bed. Center these, tuck under end of bed and make hospital corners. Fold down the top sheet over the blanket about six inches. Fold both top sheet and blanket down so resident can easily get into bed. If resident will not be returning to bed immediately, leave bedding up. 9.Remove pillows and pillowcases. Put on clean pillowcases. Replace pillows. 10.Return bed to lowest position.

39 Making an unoccupied bed 12.Take laundry bag or hamper to proper area. 13.Wash your hands. 14.Document procedure using facility guidelines.

40 Making a surgical bed Equipment: clean linen (see procedure: Making an unoccupied bed), gloves 1.Wash your hands. 2.Place clean linen on clean surface within reach (e.g., bedside stand, overbed table, or chair). 3.Adjust bed to a safe working level, usually waist high. Lock bed wheels. 4.Put on gloves. 5.Remove all soiled linen, rolling it (soiled side inside) from head to foot of bed. Avoid contact with your skin or clothes. Place it in a hamper or bag. 6.Remove and discard gloves. Wash your hands.

41 Making a surgical bed 7.Make an unoccupied, closed bed. See procedure: Making an unoccupied bed. 8.Loosen linens on the side of bed that is away from the door (where the stretcher will be). 9.Fanfold linens lengthwise to the side away from door. Fanfolded means folded several times into pleats. 10.Put on clean pillowcases. Replace pillows. 11.Leave bed in its locked position with both side rails down. 12.Make sure the pathway to the bed is clear.

42 Making a surgical bed 13.Take laundry bag or hamper to proper area. 14.Wash your hands. 15.Document procedure using facility guidelines.

43 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam Multiple Choice. Choose the correct answer. 1.What can an overbed table be used for? (A)Placement of dirty linens (B)Placement of bedpans (C)Placement of meals (D)Placement of urinals 2.How should a nursing assistant enter a resident’s room? (A)Knock and wait for permission to enter (B)Walk in if the door is open (C)Say her name as she walks in (D)Call the resident first to make sure he or she is alone

44 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 3.Which of the following is a type of disposable equipment? (A)An autoclave (B)An electric razor (C)A bedpan (D)Gloves 4.When leaving a resident’s room, a nursing assistant should (A)Leave the call light within the resident’s reach (B)Move the resident’s belongings (C)Leave spills for the next shift (D)Remind the resident not to call her again because she’ll be busy with other residents

45 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 5.How can a nursing assistant help control odors in a facility? (A)He can ask the resident to clean up if he soils his linens. (B)He can clean up within an hour after episodes of incontinence. (C)He can ask residents to use the toilets in the reception area instead of in their units. (D)He can empty and clean bedpans immediately after use. 6.Which of the following is true of sleep? (A)The elderly usually go to sleep faster than other groups. (B)The elderly are more able to tolerate sleep deprivation than other groups. (C)Lack of sleep can cause decreased mental function. (D)People can live in good health even without much sleep.

46 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 7.Lack of sleep can cause (A) Increased mental function (B) Increased reaction time (C) Increased immune system function (D) Increased irritability 8.The bedside stand is used for (A) Linen storage (B) Serving meals (C) Storing equipment (D) Storing valuables

47 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 9.What should be done with soiled bed linens? (A)They should be shaken out to be sure none of the residents’ personal belongings are put in the wash. (B)They should be rolled up with the dirty side in. (C)They should be rolled up with the clean side in. (D)They should be left in a pile outside the resident’s door for housekeeping to pick up. 10.When should sheets be changed? (A)Daily (B)Twice a week (C)Every other day (D)When they are soiled, wrinkled, or damp

48 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 11.According to OBRA, what temperature range must long-term care facilities maintain? (A)61-71°F (B)71-81°F (C)81-91°F (D)91-101°F 12.Which of the following statements is true of linen? (A)Linen should be carried close to the NA’s uniform. (B)Linen should be shaken to remove wrinkles. (C)Dirty linen should be removed by rolling it away from the NA. (D)Linen can be taken from one resident’s room into another resident’s room.

49 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 13.Which of the following terms describes a bed that is completely made, with the bedspread and blankets in place? (A)Closed bed (B)Open bed (C)Occupied bed (D)Unoccupied bed 14.In which type of environment do microorganisms thrive? (A) Cool, dry environments (B) Clean, cold environments (C) Dry, hot environments (D) Warm, moist environments

50 12 The Resident’s Unit Exam 15.Where should the call light be placed when a nursing assistant leaves a resident’s room? (A)On the bedside table beside the telephone (B)Next to the television remote (C)Within the resident’s reach (D)On a chair next to the resident’s bed 16.The circadian rhythm is (A)The 24-hour day-night cycle (B)The lack of ability to fall asleep or stay asleep (C)Deep sleep that helps the body to renew (D)The habit of taking short naps throughout the day

51 12 The Resident’s Unit CHAPTER 12 PRACTICE 1. According to OBRA, what temperature range must long-term care facilities maintain? (A) 61-71°F (B) 71-81°F (C) 81-91°F (D) 91-101°F 2. The circadian rhythm is (A) The 24-hour day-night cycle (B) The lack of ability to fall asleep or stay asleep (C) Deep sleep that helps the body to renew (D) The habit of taking short naps throughout the day 3. When should sheets be changed? (A) Daily (B) Twice a week (C) Every other day (D) When they are soiled, wrinkled, or damp 4. How can a nursing assistant help control odors in a facility? (A) He can ask the resident to clean up if he soils his linens. (B) He can clean up within an hour after episodes of incontinence. (C) He can ask residents to use the toilets in the reception area instead of in their units. (D) He can empty and clean bedpans immediately after use. 5. Lack of sleep can cause (A) Increased mental function (B) Increased reaction time (C) Increased immune system function (D) Increased irritability

52 12 The Resident’s Unit CHAPTER 12 PRACTICE ANSWERS 1.B-71* TO 81* 2.A-THE LACK OF ABILITY TO FALL ASLEEP OR STAY ASLEEP 3.D-GLOVES 4.D-EMPTY AND CLEAN BEDPANS IMMEDIATELY AFTER USE 5.D- INCREASED IRRATIBILITY


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