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Composed Portraits OTEC 603 - Spring 2010 Michael Childers - John Coney Jean Javellana - Myla Gumayagay.

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Presentation on theme: "Composed Portraits OTEC 603 - Spring 2010 Michael Childers - John Coney Jean Javellana - Myla Gumayagay."— Presentation transcript:

1 Composed Portraits OTEC Spring 2010 Michael Childers - John Coney Jean Javellana - Myla Gumayagay

2 “If you saw a man drowning, and you could either save him or photograph the event, what shutter speed would you use?”

3 Instructional Goal A picture is worth a thousand words. Defining a well composed portrait requires guidance. The instructional goal is to teach university students and staff to be able determine the components of a well composed portrait. Portrait may be perceived differently by different people, however we will introduce several key concepts to better define the components to a well composed portrait.

4 Target Audience The setting for this training will be for college students and staff of the University of Hawai`i System who recently upgraded from point and shoot to digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras. The SLR is defined as a type of camera which incorporates a viewing system where the subject is seen through the lens. Many students and staff share an interest in photography for artistic reasons as well as to support teaching. Today, with social networking, portraits are often posted online shortly after the pictures were taken.

5 Instructional Analysis Gagne's Condition of Learning o Focus of Theory - Intellectual Skills Instructional Analysis o Goal Analysis o Subordinate Skills Analysis Instructional Goal: Given samples of portraits, the learners will be able to determine the components of well composed portraits.

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7 Skills List: 1. Determine Subject for Portrait 2. Determine Appropriate Background 3. Determine Lighting 4. Determine Composition 5. Determine Camera Settings Subordinate Skills: 1. Determine Subject for Portrait a. Define subject 2. Determine Appropriate Back a. Define mood 3. Determine Lighting a. Define artificial lighting 4. Determine Composition a. Define rules of thirds b. Define angle of subject 5.Determine Camera Settings a. Define aperture b. Define shutter speed c. Define focus Entry Level (EL) Behaviors: 1. Understanding that a portrait commonly is the photograph of a human face depicting a mood. 2. Comprehend different moods (i.e. happy, sad, romantic) are appropriate for different subjects. 3. Understand adequate light is necessary for portraits. 4. Understand composition is the arrangements of parts in relation to each other as a whole. 5. Understanding that camera settings are important.

8 Instructional Strategy Instructional Goal: Given samples of portraits, the learner will be able to determine the components of a well composed portrait.

9 Content Analysis Pre-Instructional, Assessment, and Follow-through Activities Sequence and Clustering of Objectives Gagne's Nine Events of Instruction Worksheet Content Presentation and Learner Participation o Skill #11 - Define Aperture o Skill #12 - Define Shutter Speed o Skill #13 - Define Focus

10 Transition to Prototype Module

11 Table of Contents Pre-test Introduction PART 1 - Camera Settings Lesson 1 Define Aperture Example Non-examples Lesson 1 Practice Test Lesson 1 Practice Test Key Lesson 2 Define Shutter Speed Examples Non-examples Lesson 2 Practice Test Lesson 2 Practice Test Key Lesson 3 Define Focus Examples Non-examples Lesson 3 Practice Test Lesson 3 Practice Test Key Post Test Apeture Post Test Shutter Speed Post Test Focus Post Test Post Test Key Formative Feedback

12 Introduction

13 Introduction - Module

14 Camera Controls

15 Best Design Features Terms were defined with Examples Instruction was clear Increased Understanding of Module Objectives

16 Formative Evaluation Module Evaluated by UH Students/Staff o Interested in SLR Digital Photography One on One Format Each Team Member Conducted One Evaluation o (One Member Conducted Two) N=5 Conducted on Campus in "Quiet Place" Each Evaluation took about One Hour

17 Likert Scale Strongly disagree 2. Disagree 3. Neither agree nor disagree 4. Agree 5. Strongly agree

18 Pretest Evaluation N=5 Understand Questions? Skill Level? Photography Interest? Identify Controls? Understand Aperture? Understand Shutter Speed? Understand Focus?

19 Module Evaluation N=5 Module Hold Attention? Appropriate Length? Easy to Follow? Challenging? Illustrations Appropriate?

20 Post Test Evaluation N=5 Understand questions? Understand Aperture? Understand Shutter Speed? Understand Focus? Tests Measure Materials?

21 Formative Evaluation Summary What Went Well Each Term was defined with Examples Instruction was Clear Increased Understanding of Module Objectives

22 What Went Well Aperture and Depth of Field (DOF) The Depth of Field is the distance wherein objects are in focus.

23 Formative Evaluation Summary What Went Wrong Pictures Too Small Some Questions Difficult to Understand

24 What Went Wrong Some Images too Small

25 Next Time... Paper format was OK Instruction could have been better using a different format, would allow larger images Use powerpoint E - Pictures - Module online as a web page Time and Money No object Overall Objective is to take better potraits Module may have been better presented if Instructor led Learn by Doing - Have students use an SLR

26 Mahalo


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