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Universal Screening: A Look at Behavior Screening Tools in Tiered Systems of Support Chicago, October 29, 2014 Kathleen Lynne Lane, Ph.D., BCBA-D, University.

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Presentation on theme: "Universal Screening: A Look at Behavior Screening Tools in Tiered Systems of Support Chicago, October 29, 2014 Kathleen Lynne Lane, Ph.D., BCBA-D, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Universal Screening: A Look at Behavior Screening Tools in Tiered Systems of Support Chicago, October 29, 2014 Kathleen Lynne Lane, Ph.D., BCBA-D, University of Kansas Lisa Powers, Ph.D., St. Louis Special School District Wendy Peia Oakes, Ph.D. Arizona State University

2 Agenda Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered (CI3T) Models of Prevention The Importance of Systematic Screening Using Screening Data... –implications for primary prevention efforts –implications for teachers –implications for student-based interventions at Tier 2 and Tier 3 Directions and Experiences from the Field

3 Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings AcademicBehavioral Social Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Primary Prevention (Tier 1) ≈ ≈ ≈ PBIS Framework Validated Curricula Lane & Oakes Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk

4 Primary Intervention Plan Statement Purpose Statement School-Wide Expectations *see Expectation Matrix Area I: Academics Responsibilities Students will: Area II: Behavior Responsibilities Students will: Area III: Social Skills Responsibilities Students will: Faculty and Staff will: Parents will: Administrators will: Lane & Oakes 2012

5 Essential Components of Primary Prevention Efforts Systematic Screening AcademicBehavior Treatment Integrity Social Validity

6 Measure Aug SeptOctNovDecJan FebMarchApril May School Demographics Student Demographic Information Screening Measures SRSS-IE Student Outcome Measures - Academic Student Outcome Measures - Behavior Program Measures Social Validity - PIRS Schoolwide Evaluation Tool (SET) CI3T Treatment Integrity

7 Lane & Oakes See Lane, Menzies, Oakes, and Kalberg (2012) WHAT SCREENING TOOLS ARE AVAILABLE?

8 SSBD Screening Process Pool of Regular Classroom Students TEACHER SCREENING on Internalizing and Externalizing Behavioral Dimensions 3 Highest Ranked Pupils on Externalizing and on Internalizing Behavior Criteria TEACHER RATING on Critical Events Index and Combined Frequency Index Exceed Normative Criteria on CEI of CFI DIRECT OBSERVATION of Process Selected Pupils in Classroom and on Playground Exceed Normative Criteria on AET and PSB PASS GATE 1 PASS GATE 2 PASS GATE 3 Pre-referral Intervention(s) Child may be referred to Child Study Team (Lane & Oakes, 2012)

9 Externalizing 1.44% 6.18%3.50% 3.18% 8.90%6.50% 2.73% % computed based on total # students screened Source. Lane, Menzies, Oakes, & Kalberg, Figure 2.2 WES Elementary Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders (SSBD; Walker & Severson, 1992) results comparing the percentage of students nominated and exceeding normative criteria for both externalizing and internalizing behavior disorders over a three year period. SSBD Results – Winter 2007 through Winter 2009 Risk Status of Nominated Students

10 Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS; Drummond, 1994)

11 Student Risk Screening Scale (Drummond, 1994) The SRSS is 7-item mass screener used to identify students who are at risk for antisocial behavior. Uses 4-point Likert-type scale never = 0, occasionally = 1, sometimes = 2, frequently = 3 Teachers evaluate each student on the following items - Steal- Low Academic Achievement - Lie, Cheat, Sneak- Negative Attitude - Behavior Problem - Aggressive Behavior - Peer Rejection Student Risk is divided into 3 categories Low0 – 3 Moderate4 – 8 High9 – 21 (SRSS; Drummond, 1994)

12 Student Risk Screening Scale (Drummond, 1994) Lane & Oakes

13 Student Risk Screening Scale Middle School Fall Fall 2011 Fall Screeners n = 12 n = 20 n = 507 Percentage of Students N=534N=502N=454N=476N=477N=470N=524N= 539 Lane & Oakes

14 VariableRisk Low (n = 422) M (SD) Moderate (n = 51) M (SD) High (n = 12) M (SD) Significance Testing ODR1.50 (2.85) 5.02 (5.32) 8.42 (7.01) LM, H M=H Course Failures0.68 (1.50) 2.78 (3.46) 4.17 (3.49) L

15 Convergent Validity: SRSS-E7, SRSS-I5, & SRSS-IE12 with the SSBD Lane, K. L., Oakes, W. P., Harris, P. J., Menzies, H. M., Cox, M. L., & Lambert, W. (2012) Initial evidence for the reliability and validity of the Student Risk Screening Scale for internalizing and externalizing behaviors at the elementary level. Behavioral Disorders, 37, Note. SSBD refers to the Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders (Walker & Severson, 1992). SRSS-IE5 refers to the version with 5 times retained. SRSS-IE12 refers to the original 7 items from the SRSS developed by Drummond (1994) combined with the new five items constituting the SRSS-IE5. The SRSS-E7 refers to the original 7 items constituting the SRSS.

16 S TUDENT R ISK S CREENING S CALE -IE TEACHER NAME 0 = Never Steal Lie, Cheat, Sneak Behavior Problem Peer Rejection Low Academic Achievement Negative Attitude Aggressive Behavior Emotionally Flat Shy; Withdrawn Sad; Depressed Anxious Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior Lonely Self-Inflicts Pain 1 = Occasionally 2 = Sometimes 3 = Frequently Use the above scale to rate each item for each student. Student Name (Lane, Oakes, Harris, Menzies, Cox, & Lambert, 2012) Original SRSS-IE items retained for use at the elementary level 14 items under development in middle and high schools

17 How do we score and interpret the SRSS-IE at the Elementary Level? 1.All scores will be automatically calculated. 2.SRSS scores are the sum of items 1 – 7 (range 0 – 21) 3.Internalizing scores are the sum of items 8-12 (range 0-15)

18 EXAMINING YOUR SCREENING DATA … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

19 Social Skills Improvement System – Performance Screening Guide Spring 2012 – Total School N = 54 N = 223 N = 212 n = 489 n = 490 n = 490 n = 489 N = 22 N = 233 N = 235 N = 35 N = 180 N = 275 N = 31 N = 187 N = 271

20 Student Risk Screening Scale Middle School Fall Fall 2011 Fall Screeners n = 12 n = 20 n = 507 Percentage of Students N=534N=502N=454N=476N=477N=470N=524N= 539 Lane & Oakes

21 EXAMINING YOUR SCREENING DATA … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

22 Examining Academic and Behavioral Data Elementary Level

23 Examining Academic and Behavioral Data Middle and High School Levels

24 Comprehensive, Integrative, Three-tiered (CI3T) Models of Support Assess, Design, Implement, and Evaluate Basic Classroom Management Effective Instruction Low Intensity Strategies Behavior Contracts Self-Monitoring - Functional Assessment-Based Interventions Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support Low Intensity Strategies Higher Intensity Strategies Assessment

25 Low-Intensity Strategies for Academics and Behavior Active SupervisionProximityPacingAppropriate use of PraiseOpportunities to RespondInstructive FeedbackIncorporating Choice

26 Self- Assessment How am I doing with … basic classroom management strategies? Instructional considerations? Low-intensity strategies?

27 Consider a book study … Build school site capacity Active Supervision Behavior Specific Praise Increased OTRs Choice

28 EXAMINING YOUR SCREENING DATA … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

29 Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings AcademicBehavioral Social Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Primary Prevention (Tier 1) ≈ ≈ ≈ PBIS Framework Validated Curricula

30 Comprehensive, Integrative, Three-tiered (CI3T) Models of Support Assess, Design, Implement, and Evaluate Basic Classroom Management Effective Instruction Low Intensity Strategies Behavior Contracts Self-Monitoring - Functional Assessment-Based Interventions Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support Low Intensity Strategies Higher Intensity Strategies Assessment

31 BASC 2 – Behavior and Emotional Screening Scale Spring 2012 N = 24 N = 67 N = 533 N = 624 n = 219 n = 202 n = 203

32 A Step-by-Step Process Step 1: Construct your assessment schedule Step 2: Identify your secondary supports Existing and new interventions Step 3: Determine entry criteria Nomination, academic failure, behavior screening scores, attendance data etc. Step 4: Identify outcome measures Pre- and posttests, CBM, office discipline data, GPA etc. Step 5: Identify exit criteria Reduction of discipline contacts, academic success, reduction of truancies and absences etc. Step 6: Consider additional needs Intervention Grids

33 Procedures for Monitoring: Assessment Schedule AugSeptOctNovDecJanFeb MarAprMay School Demographics Student Demographics XXX XX X X X X X Student Outcome Academic Measures Benchmarking - AIMSweb XXX Report Card Course Failures XXXX Student Outcome Behavior Measures Screener - SRSS XXX Discipline: ODR XXXX Attendance (Tardies/ Unexcused Absences) XXX Referrals SPED and Support-TEAM XXX Program Measures Social Validity (PIRS) XXX Schoolwide Evaluation Tool X CI3T Treatment Integrity X

34 Looking at Data … Expanding Your Tool Kit What data do you already collect? What are the cut scores for each screening tool? Remember … It is a just a screener.

35 Examining Academic and Behavioral Data Elementary Level

36 Sample Secondary Intervention Grid SupportDescription Schoolwide Data: Entry Criteria Data to Monitor Progress Exit Criteria Behavior Contract A written agreement between two parties used to specify the contingent relationship between the completion of a behavior and access to or delivery of a specific reward. Contract may involve administrator, teacher, parent, and student. Behavior: SRSS - mod to high risk Academic: 2 or more missing assignments with in a grading period Work completion, or other behavior addressed in contract Treatment Integrity Social Validity Successful Completion of behavior contract Self- monitoring Students will monitor and record their academic production (completion/ accuracy) and on-task behavior each day. Students who score in the abnormal range for H and CP on the SDQ; course failure or at risk on CBM Work completion and accuracy in the academic area of concern; passing grades Treatment Integrity Social Validity Passing grade on the report card in the academic area of concern Sample Secondary Intervention Grid Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies (2009). pp , Boxes

37 Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings AcademicBehavioral Social Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Primary Prevention (Tier 1) ≈ ≈ ≈ PBIS Framework Validated Curricula

38 Comprehensive, Integrative, Three-tiered (CI3T) Models of Support Assess, Design, Implement, and Evaluate Basic Classroom Management Effective Instruction Low Intensity Strategies Behavior Contracts Self-Monitoring - Functional Assessment-Based Interventions Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support Low Intensity Strategies Higher Intensity Strategies Assessment

39 Changes in Harry’s Behavior Cox, M., Griffin, M. M., Hall, R., Oakes, W. P., & Lane, K. L. (2012). Using a functional assessment-based intervention to increase academic engaged time in an inclusive middle school setting. Beyond Behavior, 2, 44 – 54.

40 A LOOK TO THE FIELD…

41 A Statewide Partnership The University of Kansas Professional Development Learning Center STL CI3T Training

42 LPSD MS HS CI3T Training Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings AcademicBehavioral Social Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) ≈ ≈ ≈ PBIS Framework Validated Curricula Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk Positive Action Primary Prevention (Tier 1)

43 St. Louis CI3T Training CI3T Training Series 11/13/14 12/12/141/14/15 2/25/15 4/7/155/6/15 Your school has selected a TEAM to attend the training this year. Only they are asked to attend. STL CI3T Training

44 Session 1: 2 hr MTSS: CI3T Model: An Overview Session 2: full day Building the Primary Prevention Plan Session 3: 2 hr How to Monitor the Plan Session 4: Full Day Building Tier 2 Supports Session 5: 2 hr Building Tier 3 Supports Session 6: Full Day Prepare to Implement Share Overview with Faculty & Staff; Build Reactive Plan Finalize & Share Expectation Matrix and Teaching & Reinforcing Components HW Share Screeners; Complete Assessment Schedule HW Share MTSS: CI3T plan; Complete PIRS & Secondary Grid HW Share revised MTSS: CI3T plan; Complete MTSS: CI3T Feedback Form HW STL CI3T Training

45 To contribute important information to your school’s TEAM as they attend training and develop your school’s CI3T Plan ___________________________________ We invite your participation…. Specifically, TODAY –SESSS: Schoolwide Expectations Survey for Specific Settings. Share your opinions about student behaviors important for success at your school (15 min) –Demo: Tell us about yourself – Complete the brief confidential demographic information form (5 min) STL CI3T Training

46 And…. Provide your opinion on the developing plan in the SPRING –Primary Intervention Rating Scale (10 min) Complete a confidential survey giving your opinions on the first complete draft of the plan –Comprehensive Three-Tiered Prevention Plan Feedback form (10 min) Complete a short feedback form on the revised and completed CI3T Plan **You will receive links to these surveys** STL CI3T Training

47 CI 3 T: Ticket Examples

48 CI3T: Tertiary Prevention CI3T: Secondary Prevention CI3T: Primary Prevention Session 1: Overview of CI3T Prevention Models Setting a Purpose Establish team meetings and roles Session 2: Mission and Purpose Establish Roles and Responsibilities Procedures for Teaching Procedures for Reinforcing Reactive Plan Session 3: Procedures for Monitoring Session 4: Revise Primary Plan using Stakeholder feedback Prepare presentation Session 5: Overview of Teacher focused Strategies Overview of Student Focused Strategies Using data to determine Draft the Secondary Intervention Grid based on existing supports Session 6: Final revisions of CI3T Plan based on stakeholder feedback Draft Tertiary Prevention Intervention Grids Design Implementation Manual and Plan for roll out to faculty, students, and parents MTSS: CI3T Training Series Additional Professional Development on Specific Topics Core Content Curriculum Teacher Drive Supports: Instructional Techniques to Improve Students’ Motivation; General Classroom Management Practices; Low Intensity Behavior Supports Functional Assessment- based Interventions Reading, Math, Writing Benchmarking and Progress Monitoring Tools Student Driven Interventions, Strategies, & Practices Check In - Check Out Additional Tier 3 Supports CI3T Team Training Sequence Implementation Stages of Tier 2 and 3 within CI3T

49 Behavior Screening Tools Using School- wide Data to Identify Students for Tier 2 and Tier 3 Supports Using Instructional Techniques to Improve Students' Motivation Using Simple Strategies to Improve Classroom Behavior Using Self- Monitoring Strategies to Improve Academic Performance Professional Development: A Collaborative Effort to Empower Public School Systems Project Empower September 12 October 7 November 21 January 30 March 5 Five 2-hour sessions held after school: 5-7pm to Calendar and Search Project Empower)

50 Recommendations to Consider  Recommendation #1: Build Stakeholders’ Expertise  Recommendation #2: Develop the Structures to Sustain and Improve Practices  Recommendation #3: Conduct Screenings in a Responsible Fashion  Recommendation #4: Consider Legal Implications- know your state laws (Lane & Oakes, 2012)

51 Moving Forward Questions: Thank you!

52 Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered (CI3T) Models of Prevention: Step by Step Guide (2014). A special issue of Preventing School Failure. VD8 Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M, Oakes, W. P., & Kalberg, J. R. (2012). Systematic screenings of behavior to support instruction: From preschool to high school. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

53 Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M., Bruhn, A.L., & Crnobori, M. (2011). Managing Challenging Behaviors in Schools: Research-Based Strategies That Work. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Lane, K. L., Kalberg, J. R. & Menzies, H. M. (2009). Developing Schoolwide Programs to Prevent and Manage Problem Behaviors: A Step-by-Step Approach. New York, NY: Guilford Press.


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