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USING INFORMATION FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE The National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP) Tom Kingsley, The Urban Institute.

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Presentation on theme: "USING INFORMATION FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE The National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP) Tom Kingsley, The Urban Institute."— Presentation transcript:

1 USING INFORMATION FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE The National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP) Tom Kingsley, The Urban Institute

2 2 NNIP Partner Cities Oakland Denver Cleveland Atlanta Boston Providence 1995 Oakland Denver Cleveland Atlanta Boston Providence Washington, DC 1997 Oakland Denver Cleveland Atlanta Boston Providence Washington, DC Indianapolis Milwaukee Miami Baltimore Philadelphia

3 NNIP u Collaborative effort - Urban Institute and local partners in twelve cities u Partners operate information systems – Recurrently updated neighborhood data – Multiple topics-data sources u Success required 3 kinds of innovations 1. Technological 2. Institutional 3. Using information for change

4 1. THE TECHNOLOGY u Systems now possible due to - Powerful PCs, dramatic cost reduction - Automation of administrative records - GIS software (address matching/Tiger files) u Most common data in Partners’ systems - Vital statistics (births, deaths) - Police data (crimes/victims) - Public assistance - Tax assessment, property conditions - Business establishments, employment - Schools, hospitals, health agencies

5 2. THE INSTITUTIONS u NNIP Partners -- mostly nonprofit, non- governmental: - Nonprofit civic intermediaries (Baltimore, Milwaukee, Oakland, Philadelphia, Providence, Washington) - Community foundations (Boston, Denver) - University-based centers (Atlanta, Cleveland) - United Way/University (Indianapolis) -Government agency (Miami) u All work by collaborating - With public agencies, nonprofits, businesses - NNIP collaboration with NARC and Ford-CSS

6 u Offer a one-stop-shop for data - Tremendous efficiency for users - Benefits of social infrastructure u Positioned to maintain trust of data providers and users over long term - Not linked to short term political interest - Care with cleaning and release of data u Are, or can be, locally self sustaining - Can cover major part of cost with fee income - But some local general support required

7 3. INFORMATION FOR CHANGE u Democratizing Information - Facilitating the direct use of data by stakeholders - not writing the reports yourself u Primary mission — strengthening, empowering low-income neighborhoods - Work for many clients but influence of this this theme evident in all work u Information as a bridge for collaboration

8 Examples: u Boston - Dialogue around indicators (engaging all of civil society) basis for city strategy - New partnership Metro Area Planning Council Address smart growth/equitable devel. u Cleveland - Regional maps - vulnerable welfare recipients and entry level jobs - estimated travel times - State put in $10 M for systems changes

9 9 AtlantaDenver Spatial patterns of welfare & jobs

10 CROSS-SITE ACTION INITIATIVES Health Analysis for HHS u Cross site analysis - 5 cities Relationship neighborhood conditions and health (partner data and 2000 census) u But each site focusing on innovative health indicator tied to local policy action - Cleveland – primary health care for children - Denver – child violence index and environment - Indianapolis – child obesity - Oakland – asthma rates - Providence – mobility as a factor in child health

11 11 Philadelphia Neighborhood Transformation Initiative “NTI” - $295 million bond - Agency realignment - An objective lens though which development decisions are made - Land Bank - Demolition of dangerous residential and commercial properties and encapsulation for future rehabilitation Data driven, citywide strategic framework for housing and neighborhood development

12 12 NTI Market Analysis Housing sales prices Demolition activity Vacancy rates Presence of dangerous properties Owner occupancy rates Age of housing Presence of non-market rate rental housing Mix of commercial and residential uses Consumer credit profiles 1. Underlying Data 2. Statistical cluster analysis leads to creation of market types Regional Choice High Value & Appreciating Steady Transitional (up and down) Distressed Reclamation 3. Government has a role in each market type Regional Choice- Serve as a market promoter High Value & Appreciating- Facilitate healthy functioning of the private market Steady- carefully respond to any changes in the private market Transitional (up and down) Rapidly respond to any signs of physical or economic deterioration; introduce aggressive preservation programs Distressed- Identify ways to invest in areas of market strength Reclamation- Invest to Build from Strength or Create Conditions for Market Rebirth 4. Statistical analysis of housing markets leads to strategic investment strategies

13 13 Statistical analysis of housing markets leads to strategic investment strategies Philadelphia Neighborhood Transformation Initiative “NTI” A set of investments designed to clear the path of development A set of investments designed to mitigate problems before they have a chance to take root or spread A set of investments designed to capitalize on place based assets

14 WORK OF THE PARTNERSHIP (Major funders: Annie E. Casey and Rockefeller Foundations) u Building tools around innovations - Guidebooks on all aspects of the work of local partners:technical, institutional, applications u Cross site studies to learn more about the dynamics of neighborhood change - Spatial patterns of welfare recipients vs. new job openings in 5 cities - New HHS study on relationships between neighborhood conditions & health outcomes

15 u National Neighborhood Data System - Consistently defined data from partners - National data sets with neighborhood data u Many forms of dissemination - NNIP-News list-serve - NNIP web site - Major conferences (1998, 2000, 2001) - Presentations at other conferences/mtgs u Technical assistance to help groups in new cities get started 11 cities so far

16 EXPANDING CAPACITY IN NEW CITIES 24 cities -- various stages Casey LLPs Camden Des Moines Hartford Louisville New Orleans San Antonio Seattle Casey LLPs Camden Des Moines Hartford Louisville New Orleans San Antonio Seattle In Process Battle Creek Canton Chicago Detroit Grand Rapids Kansas City Memphis Minneapolis New Haven Pittsburgh Portland In Process Battle Creek Canton Chicago Detroit Grand Rapids Kansas City Memphis Minneapolis New Haven Pittsburgh Portland Est. Institutions Chattanooga Columbus Los Angeles New York Sacramento St. Louis Utica Est. Institutions Chattanooga Columbus Los Angeles New York Sacramento St. Louis Utica

17 For More Information on NNIP u Web site: u u Mailing address: Tom Kingsley or Kathy Pettit National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership c/o The Urban Institute 2100 M Street NW Washington, DC USA


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