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STATEWIDE INTERVIEWS WITH ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERS Portraits in Caring.

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Presentation on theme: "STATEWIDE INTERVIEWS WITH ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERS Portraits in Caring."— Presentation transcript:

1 STATEWIDE INTERVIEWS WITH ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERS Portraits in Caring

2 Who was interviewed by DEQ staff?

3 Interviewees American Electric Power/Appalachian Power – Ron Jefferson (Richmond), John McManus (Columbus, Ohio), Karen Gilmer (Clinch River), & others Cabell Brand Center for International Poverty & Resource Studies – Cabell Brand (Salem) Capital Region Land Conservancy and Richmond Region Energy Alliance – Bill Greenleaf (Richmond) Chesapeake Bay Foundation – Ann Jennings Dominion – Bob Blue & Pam Faggert Hunton & Williams and Virginia Manufacturers Association – Brooks Smith James River Association – Bill Street Luck Companies – Doug Palmore McGuire Woods Consulting & Former Secretary of Natural Resources & Legislator – Preston Bryant Mountain Heritage – Frank Kilgore (Coalfield region) The Nature Conservancy – Michael Lipford & Nikki Rovner New River Land Trust – John Eustis (Blacksburg) New River Valley Planning District Commission – Carol Davis (Radford) People, Inc. – Rob Goldsmith (Abingdon) Pulaski County, Community Development – Shawn Utt Roanoke City Council ( ) & Asst. Sec. for Conservation, Research & Education, US Dept. of Agriculture ( ) - Rupert Cutler, PhD (Roanoke) Sierra Club – Ivy Main (Northern Virginia) Smithfield Foods – Dennis H. Treacy Virginia Agribusiness Council – Katie Frazier Virginia Association of Counties (VACO) – Larry Land (Richmond), Larry Wills (Augusta County), Ann Mallek (Albemarle County), Peter Mansfield (Middlesex County), Cassandra Stish (Buckingham County) Virginia Association of Municipal Wastewater Authorities (VAMWA) – Chris Pomeroy (AquaLaw), Frank Harksen (Hanover County), Mike McEvoy (Western Virginia Water Authority), Tom Broderick (Loudoun Water), Jay Bernas (Hampton Roads Sanitation District) Virginia Conservation Network – Nathan Lott Virginia Farm Bureau – Martha Moore & Wilmer Stoneman Virginia Municipal League (VML) – Joe Lerch (Richmond), Bob Lazaro (Purcellville), George Solley (Fredericksburg), Jay Fisette (Arlington) Virginia Outdoors Foundation & Farmer – Neal Kilgore (Coalfield region) Wetlands Watch – Skip Stiles (Tidewater)

4 What did DEQ staff ask these leaders? What environmental & energy issues, if not addressed in the near future, will be of greatest concern to you in the next years?

5 Major issues identified by interviewees Water quality (nonpoint) Water supply Energy supply Climate trends Societal growth

6 Substantive comments What did the interviewees say?

7 Water quality/nonpoint

8 Implementation of TMDLs, including appropriate balance of requirements between point and nonpoint sources Accommodation of discharges from new industries and wastewater treatment plants Fresh water nutrient standard Appropriate methods of land application of manure, litter, and biosolids; other beneficial uses (e.g., energy production) Reducing impacts of water pollution on recreational and commercial fisheries Effectively addressing emerging contaminants in water supplies, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products Cost of BMPs Trading between farmers and wastewater treatment plants and MS4s Land conservation practices that improve water quality Legacy pollution issues (e.g., PCBs, old military facilities) Measuring effectiveness of nonpoint BMPs (based on improved water quality or numbers in models?) Flexibility in which BMPs to adopt in a given setting For trading purposes, evaluating whether it is realistic to take land permanently out of cultivation & still feed people in 2050 Contribution by individuals to nonpoint-source pollution (e.g., fertilizing & watering lawns) as well as by farmers & municipalities Funding educational efforts (e.g., extension service) Urban water standards & related concepts (i.e., does all water need to be fishable/swimmable?)

9 Water quality/nonpoint Implementation of TMDLs, including appropriate balance of requirements between point and nonpoint sources Accommodation of discharges from new industries and wastewater treatment plants Fresh water nutrient standard Appropriate methods of land application of manure, litter, and biosolids; other beneficial uses (e.g., energy production) Reducing impacts of water pollution on recreational and commercial fisheries Effectively addressing emerging contaminants in water supplies, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products Cost of BMPs Trading between farmers and wastewater treatment plants and MS4s Land conservation practices that improve water quality Legacy pollution issues (e.g., PCBs, old military facilities) Measuring effectiveness of nonpoint BMPs (based on improved water quality or numbers in models?) Flexibility in which BMPs to adopt in a given setting For trading purposes, evaluating whether it is realistic to take land permanently out of cultivation & still feed people in 2050 Contribution by individuals to nonpoint-source pollution (e.g., fertilizing & watering lawns) as well as by farmers & municipalities Funding educational efforts (e.g., extension service) Urban water standards & related concepts (i.e., does all water need to be fishable/swimmable?)

10 Water supply

11 Clean, safe, and adequate supply of drinking water Cooling water for power plants and other industries Salt water intrusion Longer usage projections in planning and permitting for ground water and surface water withdrawals Statewide ground water and surface water mapping; scientific evaluation of existing resources & usage Improving understanding of the ecological effects of flow alternations in rivers and streams Statutory change to implement ground water (and surface water) management area statewide Monitoring of private wells for quality and sufficiency of quantity Party(ies) responsible for ensuring quality of private well water and associated costs Potential legal liability for local governments if treatment facilities have problems that result in unsafe water Sufficient clean water for recreation Sufficient clean water as habitat for aquatic species Sufficient water for agriculture Balance all beneficial uses of water (surface & ground water) Banking of raw water in existing quarries and other structures Efficiency in water usage & pricing (e.g., lower price for using non-potable to water lawns, flush toilets, etc.) Water ethics (everyone is entitled to clean water for drinking & personal use? how to provide at reasonable cost) Grandfathered groundwater withdrawals (e.g., Tidewater) Alternative onsite septic systems (consumer education about; inspections & repair) Greater use of alternative sources to meet needs other than drinking water. Prioritization of use for highest quality available supplies How to deal with projected water shortages If/how to price water to reflect true cost

12 Water supply Clean, safe, and adequate supply of drinking water Cooling water for power plants and other industries Salt water intrusion Longer usage projections in planning and permitting for ground water and surface water withdrawals Statewide ground water and surface water mapping; scientific evaluation of existing resources & usage Improving understanding of the ecological effects of flow alternations in rivers and streams Statutory change to implement ground water (and surface water) management area statewide Monitoring of private wells for quality and sufficiency of quantity Party(ies) responsible for ensuring quality of private well water and associated costs Potential legal liability for local governments if treatment facilities have problems that result in unsafe water Sufficient clean water for recreation Sufficient clean water as habitat for aquatic species Sufficient water for agriculture Balance all beneficial uses of water (surface & ground water) Banking of raw water in existing quarries and other structures Efficiency in water usage & pricing (e.g., lower price for using non-potable to water lawns, flush toilets, etc.) Water ethics (everyone is entitled to clean water for drinking & personal use? how to provide at reasonable cost) Grandfathered groundwater withdrawals (e.g., Tidewater) Alternative onsite septic systems (consumer education about; inspections & repair) Greater use of alternative sources to meet needs other than drinking water. Prioritization of use for highest quality available supplies How to deal with projected water shortages If/how to price water to reflect true cost

13 Energy supply

14 Incentives to encourage renewable energy, especially involving local government partnerships with local industries Meeting increased energy demand Energy efficiency (technology, how consumers can finance, and user behavior; “smart” grid development) Aging out & retirement of baseload plants (e.g., nuclear, coal) Expanding net metering for farmers, residences, industries without shifting costs to those who do not self-generate Infrastructure to transmit natural gas & other forms of energy Grid modernization & integrating intermittent sources (e.g., wind, solar) Appropriate balance of affordability, reliability, and cleanliness of energy sources Sensible time frame for transitioning from coal and natural gas to renewables, etc.; incremental steps in transitioning away from fossil fuels Cost recovery issues for utility infrastructure as more self-generation Potential impacts of fracking, uranium mining, etc. on water supplies Impacts of using crops & forests as fuels/energy sources

15 Energy supply Incentives to encourage renewable energy, especially involving local government partnerships with local industries Meeting increased energy demand Energy efficiency (technology, how consumers can finance, and user behavior; “smart” grid development) Aging out & retirement of baseload plants (e.g., nuclear, coal) Expanding net metering for farmers, residences, industries without shifting costs to those who do not self-generate Infrastructure to transmit natural gas & other forms of energy Grid modernization & integrating intermittent sources (e.g., wind, solar) Appropriate balance of affordability, reliability, and cleanliness of energy sources Sensible time frame for transitioning from coal and natural gas to renewables, etc.; incremental steps in transitioning away from fossil fuels Cost recovery issues for utility infrastructure as more self-generation Potential impacts of fracking, uranium mining, etc. on water supplies Impacts of using crops & forests as fuels/energy sources

16 Climate trends

17 Water quality impacts (loss of tidal and nontidal wetlands; impact on instream flow; impacts of sea level rise on existing infrastructure, like low-lying wastewater treatment plants) Greenhouse gas emissions; developing technology that can address CO by utilities, transportation sector, and other contributors Future construction in low-lying coastal areas (including insurance in floodplain, & policies re subsidizing building or rebuilding in floodplain) Analysis of impacts on agriculture, tourism, construction industry, insurance companies, seafood industry, ports & shipping, military installations (e.g., Wallops Island) and other economic sectors, and planning how to manage impacts to best advantage Economic development goals vs. urban planning goals Adapting to severe weather events (drought, hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes, earthquakes) Impact of floods & other severe weather on historic/cultural resources Groundwater recharge in face of changing winter weather patterns Potential changes in crops that can be grown (e.g., drought-resistant; crops that formerly could only be grown in Florida & other warmer locations; pest & disease issues, such as soybean rust brought by hurricane)

18 Climate trends Water quality impacts (loss of tidal and nontidal wetlands; impact on instream flow; impacts of sea level rise on existing infrastructure, like low-lying wastewater treatment plants) Greenhouse gas emissions; developing technology that can address CO by utilities, transportation sector, and other contributors Future construction in low-lying coastal areas (including insurance in floodplain, & policies re subsidizing building or rebuilding in floodplain) Analysis of impacts on agriculture, tourism, construction industry, insurance companies, seafood industry, ports & shipping, military installations (e.g., Wallops Island) and other economic sectors, and planning how to manage impacts to best advantage Economic development goals vs. urban planning goals Adapting to severe weather events (drought, hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes, earthquakes) Impact of floods & other severe weather on historic/cultural resources Groundwater recharge in face of changing winter weather patterns Potential changes in crops that can be grown (e.g., drought-resistant; crops that formerly could only be grown in Florida & other warmer locations; pest & disease issues, such as soybean rust brought by hurricane)

19 Societal growth

20 Waste reduction, recycling, reuse, and disposal practices Redevelopment of contaminated sites (brownfields & similar) Aging infrastructure  Electric grid – potential failures have ramifications for energy supply, water and sewer treatment, health & safety, national security  Dams, especially related to reservoirs – funding to maintain and repair  Funding to repair sewer systems - even when EPA grants funded construction of sewer systems, funding for maintenance and repair is a problem for local governments  Inadequate sewer systems – older systems not always constructed to accommodate industrial discharges  Roads, highways, bridges – funding and environmental impacts (E&S, for example) related to construction and repair Increased land development with potential loss of critical habitat and pressure on land preservation efforts Loss of farms, forests (including forest fragmentation), and natural areas on which agricultural, fisheries, forestry, and tourism industries rely Greater demand for ground water and surface water Plans for growth corridors, including green infrastructure like parks, wetlands, trail, forest preserves Air-quality impacts of Virginia’s population centers Energy efficiency and sustainability Planning for additional uses of coastal waters, the ocean, and ports Managing fire Shifting housing patterns & ramifications thereof (revitalization of core cities, growth of exurbs, aging suburbs) Impacts not only of more people, but also of greater impacts per person Sustainability of growth-based economy (i.e., economic performance evaluated by growth & consumption, not on sustainability or other factors) Additional planning regarding where building should occur (gobbling up farm land & forests, long commutes, extension of public services)

21 Societal growth Waste reduction, recycling, reuse, and disposal practices Redevelopment of contaminated sites (brownfields & similar) Aging infrastructure  Electric grid – potential failures have ramifications for energy supply, water and sewer treatment, health & safety, national security  Dams, especially related to reservoirs – funding to maintain and repair  Funding to repair sewer systems - even when EPA grants funded construction of sewer systems, funding for maintenance and repair is a problem for local governments  Inadequate sewer systems – older systems not always constructed to accommodate industrial discharges  Roads, highways, bridges – funding and environmental impacts (E&S, for example) related to construction and repair Increased land development with potential loss of critical habitat and pressure on land preservation efforts Loss of farms, forests (including forest fragmentation), and natural areas on which agricultural, fisheries, forestry, and tourism industries rely Greater demand for ground water and surface water Plans for growth corridors, including green infrastructure like parks, wetlands, trail, forest preserves Air-quality impacts of Virginia’s population centers Energy efficiency and sustainability Planning for additional uses of coastal waters, the ocean, and ports Managing fire Shifting housing patterns & ramifications thereof (revitalization of core cities, growth of exurbs, aging suburbs) Impacts not only of more people, but also of greater impacts per person Sustainability of growth-based economy (i.e., economic performance evaluated by growth & consumption, not on sustainability or other factors) Additional planning regarding where building should occur (gobbling up farm land & forests, long commutes, extension of public services)

22 THEIR VISIONS FOR OUR FUTURE In addition to the substantive comments, the leaders shared the following wisdom…

23 The Golden Crescent

24 Selected comments from Golden Crescent Common sense can help address our challenges (e.g., no new construction in wetlands or on beaches) Balance resource protection with responsible resource extraction & use Energy efficiency can help us maintain our current standard of living without trade-offs Focus on individual end-user behavior, and not only on commercial & industrial behavior. Each of us makes a difference, for good or ill. Politicians must act responsibly to provide funding to address long-term needs, and not just focus on getting re- elected. Sometimes taxes are necessary. Adaptation to climate events and trends is critical – more important than arguing about precise causes. Collaboration rather than conflict and competition should be the basis of our problem-solving approaches Goals include abundant clean resources, a healthy business community, and wide access by the public to beautiful natural areas Natural Resources are both environmental assets and economic drivers

25 Roanoke/Salem Blacksburg/Radford/Pulaski Abingdon Western Regions of Virginia

26 Selected comments from Roanoke Valley Change: not only what and how we change to meet future needs, but also when. Sequencing and timing are important to the continued economic viability of existing industries and other entities, which often need to change incrementally if they are to survive. Be proactive. Local food for local consumption. Local partnerships, in cooperation with state & federal officials, can accomplish a great deal. The key is to educate young people. Governments must insist that basic human needs for clean water & clean air are met.

27 Selected comments from New River Valley We must preserve the rural character of our region. Crushing poverty sometimes inhibits environmental protection. Governmental environmental programs need to be consolidated & simple. Everyone needs a meaningful seat at the table where problems are addressed.

28 Selected comments from Coal Fields Eco-tourism, higher education facilities, & high tech may help replace closed or closing coal mines & gas wells in the region’s economy. With demise of mining economy, there is great poverty & unemployment → widespread drug problems, violence, absent parents, feral children Smoking is big health problem in the region. Children should be protected from second-hand smoke. Health & environment are intertwining issues. Throughout government, leaders are disconnected from the public. Without trusting relationships, citizens are not going to want to make necessary changes to protect health and the environment. It is a mistake to separate creation from the Creator. Protecting the environment is a way to serve and “love” our neighbors and honor the Creator. Environmental stewardship is a privilege & obligation to God. Biblical & secular should be joined. Complacency is an enemy. Our energy future should be diverse, distributed, & efficient.

29 BECAME THE BASIS FOR DISCUSSIONS AT ENVIRONMENT VIRGINIA 2013 HELD AT VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE ON APRIL 9-11 SEE RESULTS OF VMI DELIBERATIONS POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE Interviewees’ ideas

30 ONE FUTURE HELP DEQ ENVISION OUR FUTURE ONE VISION


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