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By Rule of Law Unit 2. Guiding Questions: What current laws protect creative content? What are the advantages of adhering to these laws? What are the.

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Presentation on theme: "By Rule of Law Unit 2. Guiding Questions: What current laws protect creative content? What are the advantages of adhering to these laws? What are the."— Presentation transcript:

1 By Rule of Law Unit 2

2 Guiding Questions: What current laws protect creative content? What are the advantages of adhering to these laws? What are the penalties for infringing these laws? How are laws different in other countries?

3 Activity Learning Objectives Activity 1: The Why, The What, and the How of Copyright Law Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? Activity 3: The Value of the Cost Activity 4: It’s Not Just a Game Activity 5: Creative Content Anthropologists Explore “Fair Use” Recognize the consequences for illegal downloading and copying and why these consequences exist, and apply understanding from a real downloading court case and outcome to create their own consequence and/or law. Recognize the components and key characteristics of an effective user agreement; synthesize learning and apply it to a real world problem Connect the creative process behind gaming software with creative content and present the game creation process visually for the benefit of others. Summarize knowledge of creative content, how it can be used, and how it can be protected; distinguish between instances of fair use of creative content and violations of copyright law; understand the socio –cultural factors contributing to behaviors, policies, and systems; and suggest policies that will help avoid copyright violations. Recognize the potential risks of using counterfeit software and other forms of intellectual property, evaluate and explain the relative risks associated with both original and counterfeit goods, and translate understanding of risks to others who may be less familiar with them.

4 Baseline Assessment By Rule of Law 1.An example of intellectual property is: 1.A story. 2.A novel. 3.A computer game. 4.All of the above 2.Creative content impacts me: 1.Every day. 2.Rarely. 3.Never. 4.I do not know. 3.I see evidence of creative content: 1.On TV and the Internet. 2.At school. 3.In my neighborhood. 4.All of the above. 4.User agreements explain: 1.How to troubleshoot problems with a software product. 2.The guidelines for using a product and the consequences if the guidelines are not followed. 3.How to interact with other users. 4.I do not know. 5.Are there consequences for downloading music and games without permission? 1.Yes, but only if you try to sell them. 2.Yes, whether you try to sell them or not. 3.No. Anything to which you have access is open source, unless you try to sell it. 4.I don’t know.

5 Baseline Assessment Continued By Rule of Law 6.True or False: Software downloaded from a social media Web site is never copyrighted. 7.Counterfeit software: 1.Does not have a warranty, guarantee, or service support. 2.Violates copyright. 3.Can contaminate your computer with a virus. 4.All of the above. 8.Consumers should use counterfeit software: 1.Always. Counterfeit software is just as good as the original. 2.Sometimes. It saves you money. 3.Never. It violates the law and the risks outweigh the perceived benefits. 4.I do not know what that is. 9.Developing a video game is a: 1.Creative process. 2.Creative and technical process. 3.Technical process. 4.Necessary process. 10.Educators can use the copyrighted work of others: 1.However they want to use it. 2.Within the guidelines of fair use and other exceptions for classroom use. 3.Never. Educators must always obtain permission, just like everyone else. 4.I do not know.

6 Activity 1: The Why, The What, and the How of Creative Rights Activity Overview: This activity explores the theme of creative rights law. Students will read a case study and then discuss the laws and consequences pertaining to copying and selling the creative content of others. Valuable internet resources: General information on downloading laws, ethics, and offenses Court cases related to illegal downloading Highlights of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act Downloading supporters and opponents in the news

7 Activity 1: The Why, The What, and the How of Creative Rights PART 1 Step 1: Students, please get into pairs Step 2: Read the Unit Case Study: ‘Stick Bombs on the Sly’. Step 3: Respond to the following questions. (Write out the question in a Microsoft Word document and write your response underneath.) Questions: a.How would you characterize what Dave is doing? Is it entrepreneurial? Is it dishonest? b.Did Eric do anything wrong when creating the software? What about his dad? c.What do you think Erik should do now? Why? d.Do you think that Eric has any rights? Why or why not? Questions: a.How would you characterize what Dave is doing? Is it entrepreneurial? Is it dishonest? b.Did Eric do anything wrong when creating the software? What about his dad? c.What do you think Erik should do now? Why? d.Do you think that Eric has any rights? Why or why not?

8 Results Creative rights Ensure credit is given To deter people Results Yes (2) Maybe (3) –don’t care NO (10) Results Yes (12) No (4) Results Yes (15) No (1) DownloadedKnowledge Reason Non- Copyrighted Work

9 Downloading 0 You are participating in a confidential poll. 0 I will ask you 4 questions. 0 Write your HONEST response to each question. 0 Responses will be collected, tallied, and placed in the Downloading Graphic Organizer for discussion. Question1: Have you (or anyone you know) ever downloaded music, video games, or software without paying for the product? Question 2: Do you think that people who download without paying are aware of any consequences or laws? Question 3: Explain why you think laws or consequences exist for downloading. Question 4: Are these laws the same if the product is not copyrighted?

10 Activity 1: The Why, The What, and the How of Creative Rights PART 2 Choose a different partner to work in pairs. Step 1: Read through the questions on the next slide. Use the Internet to find the answers. Remember to refer to the ‘valuable Internet resources’ on SLIDE 6 of this PPT. Make sure to list in your notes the search terms and Web sites you used. Step 2: Answer the questions in a Microsoft Word document.

11 Part 2 Guiding Questions A.What are the consequences for downloading music, software, and/or video games off of the Internet without paying? B.Why do these consequences exist? C.Is downloading non-copyrighted material illegal? D.What are the rights of the creator of non-copyrighted material? E.Identify and describe the proposed penalties. In your opinion, are these consequences necessary? Are they fair? Why or why not? F.Are any consequences necessary? Why or why not? G.Summarize what the domestic laws of downloading are. Are these laws fair? H.Explain how downloading games, music, or videos relates to creative content.

12 Go back to SLIDE 7 Reread the Case Study ‘Stick Bombs on the Sly’ Respond AGAIN to the questions. Reflect on whether your perceptions have changed – or not. (Talk about any differences in your answers now from when you first responded to them.)

13 Activity 2 WHAT DID I AGREE TO? Activity Overview: Students will look at sample user agreements to discover important rights that are granted to both the user and the creator of intellectual property. Students will discuss whether these rights should be applied to other forms of media. Students will develop their own teen-friendly user agreement for an intellectual property of their choice. Valuable resources: User Agreement Rubric (next slide)

14 User Agreement Assessment Rubric Criteria4 points3 points2 points1 pointScore AgreementWhat the user is agreeing to is clearly stated. The agreement includes some details. The agreement includes very few details. The terms of the agreement are unclear. ConsequenceThe consequence for not following the user agreement is clearly stated. The consequence inlcudes some details. The consequence is unclear. The consequence is not stated. DeliveryThe user agreement was delivered in a way that is relevant, meaningful, and engaging to the audience. The agreement was delivered with two of the following characteristics: relevant, meaningful, and engaging. The agreement was delivered with on of the following characteristics: relevant, meaningful, or engaging. The user agreement was not relevant, meaningful, or engaging. TOTAL

15 Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? Do you read software user agreements before you commit to them? a. I always read them. b. I sometimes read them. c. I don’t read them. Take a POLL Jot down your response and give it to the teacher to record in the results. (Be honest) Results Part 1 Always Sometimes Never

16 Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? PART 1 Choose a different partner to work in pairs. (yes…a totally different partner!) Step 1: You will create a table in Excel to compare and contrast three user agreements in order to identify components that they have in common and that are different. Refer to the ‘valuable Internet resources’ on SLIDE 13 of this PPT. for the user agreement websites. Make sure to list in your notes the search terms and Web sites you used. Step 2: Using a Word document, compile a summary that states what the user is agreeing to in EACH user agreement. (Hint: Use the questions of the following slide to guide your summary.)

17 Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? PART 1 Part 1 Guiding Questions 1.What does each user agreement have in common? What is different? 2.What components does a software user agreement need to have to be effective? Which of these components might be different for different media? 3.What would a user agreement need to look like in order for a teen to stop, read, and reflect upon the entire document? 4.What is the user agreeing to in each user agreement?

18 Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? If Eric had included a user agreement with his game, how might the outcome have been different? (Discuss with your partner and be ready to discuss with class.) Unit Case Study: Stick Bombs on the Sly PART 2

19 Your new TASK: Create your own teen-friendly user agreement for a popular software program (or other media) of your choice. BE CREATIVE – think outside the box about what it should say and how it should look!! Your user agreement must have the following requirements: 1.Explain what the user is agreeing to. 2.Explain the consequence if the agreement is not upheld. 3.Be delivered in a way that is relevant, meaningful, and engaging to the audience. See the USER AGREEMENT ASSESSMENT RUBRIC for grading criteria. (slide 14) (The presentation will have a multiplier of 5 for a total of 60 points.) I encourage you to practice presenting your user agreements to your parents/guardians and then tweak the agreements according to their feedback. Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? PART 2

20 Activity 2: What Did I Agree To? PART 3 Presentations As each group presents, the other groups will use the rubric to evaluate their presentation. At the end of the presentation, each group will receive feedback from the other groups. After ALL the presentations are concluded, groups should review their feedback and compose 3-5 sentences to discuss whether they would make any changes to their user agreement after reviewing the feedback and watching the other class presentations.

21 Activity 3: The Value of the Cost PART 1 Activity Overview: In this activity, students compare the value of owning original software- and other forms of copyrighted works. They will review the Unit Case Study and identify possible problems students who bought the counterfeit game might encounter. Valuable Resource: Link to article: “Why a License Matters” Piracy/Why%20a%20License%20Matters.aspx (I couldn’t locate the suggested article; however, on the site you can go to STUDIES and download the Shadow Market Study to complete this task.)

22 Activity 3: The Value of the Cost PART 1 Original Counterfeit Reread the case study ‘Stick Bombs on the Sly’. Brainstorm any problems the students who bought the game copies might run into when trying to play it. Value Risk Value vs 1.Using the headings above, create your own tables in a Word document and identify the values and risks associated with both original and copied (counterfeit) software. Use your personal experiences to complete the task. 2.Read the article “Why a License Matters” and identify additional values and risks for both original and counterfeit software. (Note your additions due to the article.) 3.Discuss with your partner the values and risks associated with other forms of digital creative content, such as movies, music, books, and images. Write a short summary of your discussion. Be sure to include your thoughts to the following questions? 1.What are the values and risks for original and counterfeit forms of these media? 2.How is counterfeit digital content different from counterfeit tangible goods? YOUR TASK !

23 Activity 3: The Value of the Cost PART 2 Choose a SIDE: Original OR Counterfeit! Compose a persuasive COMIC STRIP or NEWSPAPER EDITORIDAL to encourage others t use only original or only counterfeit intellectual property. (You are to incorporate the values and risks you came up with in your graphic organizers.) Reflect on whether you believe your comic or editorial is convincing.

24 Activity 4: It’s Not Just a Game PART 1 Activity Overview: This activity explores the creative process involved in creating gaming software. Students will review the creative process of gaming development. Students will create a flowchart to visualize this process. Step 1: Watch an example of a video game - Step 2: Read through the Unit Case Study – Stick Bombs on the Sly. Step 3: List the steps you think Eric used to take his game from an idea to a finished game. Step 4: Read “Gaming: Step by Step” and identify all the steps necessary for the creation of a video game. Show which steps already identified by you on your lists and which steps you added after reading the article. Step 5: Respond to the following questions. a.At what point in the process does the game require a copyright in order to protect it? b.What will a copyright protect? c.Do you feel copyrights are necessary in a project such as this? Why or why not?

25 Activity 4: Step 1: Visit Microsoft Office online – Go through the tutorial ‘Flowcharting With Flair’ us/powerpoint-help/flowcharting- with-flair- RZ aspx?section=2 Step 2: Create a visual representation (flowchart) of the creative process involved in creating a video game. It’s Not Just a Game PART 2

26 Culminating Activity: An International Creative Content Summit Activity Overview: Students select a country and research its laws to protect creative content. Students represent their country in an imaginary international summit where the goal is standardizing the laws across the globe. Valuable Resources: The University of Chicago Library World Intellectual Property Organization Northwestern School of Law structionalmaterials/compip/ United States Patent and Trademark Office: Tips on Researching Intellectual Property Law in an International Context

27 Culminating Activity: An International Creative Content Summit Part 1 Part 2 0 Select a country to research its copyright laws. 0 Write a 1 – 2 page summary of your findings. 0 Present 3 min. presentation to other countries’ representatives. 0 Take notes on other countries copyright laws – note similarities and differences. 0 Divide into groups of 4. 0 Devise a plan for establishing a set of international laws. 0 The plan should include: 0 An introduction 0 The proposed laws 0 An explanation of their legal choices 0 A conclusion 0 Each group will present their plan 0 Vote to decide which global proposal you would like to adopt. 0 Compose a 6-8 sentence paragraph explaining whether you think this process could work at a real global conference. Why? Or Why not?


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