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“Thank You, M’am” Short Story by Langston Hughes.

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Presentation on theme: "“Thank You, M’am” Short Story by Langston Hughes."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Thank You, M’am” Short Story by Langston Hughes

2 Objective Through the study of complex plot elements, the student will be able to explain characterization and demonstrate understanding by creating a visual representation of the types of characterization and STAR process.

3 Standards Addressed Common Core 9.RL.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. 9.RL.5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. SPI Identify and analyze how the author reveals character (i.e., what the author tells us, what the other characters say about him or her, what the character does, what the character says, what the character thinks).

4 Picture This: It’s your first day in school. You are nervous enough as it is when a big kid comes down the hall and slams you with his backpack. “Get out of the way,” the kid screams as if it was your fault. You’re in a hurry to get to class, so you let this slide. After lunch, you are at your locker when the guy from the hallway is headed your way again. “Great,” you think only to realize he is coming to the locker beside you. “What is your problem?” he demands looking at you. You want to tell him to mind his own business or maybe offer him a hug, but before you can get a word out, he slams his locker door open and right into your shoulder. “This is my hall and my school!” He screams. “As soon as you realize where you are and what you’re doing you might make it to the end of the day in one piece. Otherwise, you don’t want to be running in to me again!” Do you like this guy? Why or why not?

5 Characterization Based on your prior knowledge and parts of the word, what is characterization? Characterization is the way in which an author reveals a character. We characterize people all the time. Think about a person you would never trust. Why do you not trust him or her?

6 Characterization Characterization is what an author uses to reveal or describe character traits There are two ways an author can develop character: – Direct characterization – Indirect characterization

7 Direct Characterization The writer makes direct statements about a character's personality and tells what the character is like. For example: – If the narrator in “Thank You, Ma’m” told us that Mrs. Jones was tough, nurturing, and generous.

8 Indirect Characterization the writer reveals information about a character and his personality through: – The character's words – The character’s thoughts – The character’s actions – The character’s appearance – How other characters respond to them: what they say or think about them

9 Characterization Acronym S- says T- thinks A- acts or appears R- react or respond

10 Direct or Indirect? A. Julie owned a multitude of outfits and accessories, and it always took her forever to decide which combination might impress Trent. As usual, she called her sister several times for advice. After doing so, Julie decided to give the navy blue skirt with the white sweater a try.

11 Direct or Indirect? B. Julie held up six different outfits in front of the mirror and pondered which would go best with her navy blue shoes, pastel eye shadow and the diamond earrings she’d already procured from her overflowing vanity. After ninety minutes of mixing and matching, and cell-phoning her sister three times for advice, Julie finally made up her mind. She’d give the navy blue skirt and white sweater a try, hoping Trent would love it.

12 Quickwrite Sometimes people try to take advantage of us when we least expect it. Think of a time someone took advantage of you. Describe the situation and include details of how you chose to deal with it. Did you forget it? Get revenge? Ignore it?

13 Story Preview  Thinking only of our quickwrite and the title of the story, what do you think this story is likely to be about?  Look at the pictures. Do the pictures give any additional information about what might happen in the story?  Look for any text that stands out. Maybe a quote somewhere on the page. How might that fit into your story prediction?  Scan for character information for the next 30 seconds. What characters did you find? What do you know about them?  What hints about the setting have you found?

14 What are we doing with this story? Pre-read: familiarize yourself with language, terms, pictures, etc. Read After-Reading: – Enactment – Analyzation

15 Pre-Reading To help us understand the text, readers can benefit from previewing a text and making predictions like we did.

16 Who is Langston Hughes? Name: James Langston Hughes Lived: February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967 Considered one of the earliest innovators of the literary art form “jazz poetry” Best known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance

17 Langston’s Philosophies Tried to depict the real lives of blacks in the lower social-economic class Criticized the divisions and prejudices based on skin color within the black community Stressed theme "black is beautiful" when exploring the black human condition in a variety of depths Primary concern was the uplift of his people, whose strengths, resiliency, courage, and humor he wanted to record as part of the general American experience

18 Harlem, New York What do you think of when you think of Harlem? Harlem – Neighborhood in New York City, 1920s

19 VOCABULARY

20 Presentable Presentable: – respectable, fit to be seen, acceptable – Not dressed in blue jeans, tee shirt, dirty “You might run that comb through your hair so you will look presentable.”

21 Mistrusted distrust, doubt, suspect, be wary of, be afraid of “And he did not want to be mistrusted now.”

22 Latching Clutching. grasping. Holding, grabbing, seizing “…do not make the mistake of latching onto my pocketbook nor nobody else’s …”

23 Barren Unproductive, sterile, desolate, bleak, infertile, unfruitful, inhospitable “…he couldn’t even say that as he turned at the foot of the barren stoop and looked up at the large woman in the door.”

24 Blue Suede Shoes

25 During Reading As you read, think about what you learn about each character as the story progresses.

26 How does characterization work? Look at the information in the text. List major events in chronological order. Think: What do I learn about the character?

27 Model: Remember the hallway story? It’s your first day in school. You are nervous enough as it is when a big kid comes down the hall and slams you with his backpack. “Get out of the way,” the kid screams as if it was your fault. You’re in a hurry to get to class, so you let this slide. After lunch, you are at your locker when the guy from the hallway is headed your way again. “Great,” you think only to realize he is coming to the locker beside you. “What is your problem?” he demands looking at you. You want to tell him to mind his own business or maybe offer him a hug, but before you can get a word out, he slams his locker door open and right into your shoulder. “This is my hall and my school!” He screams. “As soon as you realize where you are and what you’re doing you might make it to the end of the day in one piece. Otherwise, you don’t want to be running in to me again!”

28 After-Reading Activities examine, study, scrutinize, consider, evaluate What do we know about the story?

29 Setting  Place  Harlem, New York  Dark walkway  Mrs. Jones’ small flat  One room: bedroom, kitchen, living room, bathroom  Time  Late at night  1950’s  Clues: Blue Suede shoes

30 Conflict External – Man vs. Man Roger steals Mrs. Jones’ purse Internal – Man vs. Self Roger wants to run away but doesn’t want to disappoint Mrs. Jones

31 Theme Right vs. wrong Forgiveness Restitution

32 Reading Questions – What do you think Roger will do next? – Do you think Mrs. Jones successfully taught Roger that stealing is wrong? – Do you think that Mrs. Jones has influenced Roger’s life in a positive way? – Do you think that Roger will lead a “straight” life in the future?

33 Look at Characterization In your own words, what is characterization? In your own words, what is indirect characterization? In your own words, what is direct characterization?

34 Thank You M’am: Luella Type of Indirect Characterization ExampleExplanation S- SAYS T-THINKS A-ACTS A-APPEARANCE R-RESPONSE

35 Characters Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones – Main: is involved in the conflict – Static: doesn’t change Always caring and strong

36 Thank You Ma’m: Roger Type of Indirect Characterization ExampleExplanation S- SAYS T-THINKS A-ACTS A-APPEARANCE R-RESPONSE

37 Characters Roger – Main: conflict revolves around him Both Internal and External Conflict – Dynamic: changes Starts out a thief and liar Wants Mrs. Jones to trust him at the end


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