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Welcome! We’re glad to see you! Review the documents on the table and consider why education is important. Why do we care that all students learn? Who.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome! We’re glad to see you! Review the documents on the table and consider why education is important. Why do we care that all students learn? Who."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome! We’re glad to see you! Review the documents on the table and consider why education is important. Why do we care that all students learn? Who benefits and how do they benefit? Discuss with your colleagues and be prepared to discuss after we begin today. Identify 2 reasons you feel it’s most important for students to learn.

2 CKEC SCIENCE LEADERSHIP NETWORK JANUARY 28, 2015 Your Facilitation Team Terry Rhodes-KDE/CKEC Science Instructional Specialist Debbie Waggoner-KDE/CKEC Math & SS Instructional Specialist Melinda Curless-KDE STEM Consultant Rebecca Krall-UK Eve Proffitt-UK David Helm-Fayette Co Public Schools

3 So…Who is in the room?

4 Welcome, Who is in the room? Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

5 KSLN MEETING: STOP AND REFLECT What do I want to remember? How will I use this information, and how will I share it with others in my school and/or district? Yellow Sheet Also don’t forget to do the online Evaluation. We Need your FEEDBACK!

6 Norms: Respect Cell phone Engagement Restrooms Being prepared Side conversations Use technology to enhance your day

7 Pillars again Highly Effective Teaching and learning Assessment Literacy Leadership Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards TPGES –Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System

8 Agenda Welcome, Targets, Announcements Updates and Things to Know Intent of Leadership Networks Norms for Discussion Student Achievement Breakout Sessions Formative Assessment Student Experiences Assessment Task Evaluation Protocol Inquiry Engaging in Argument from Evidence Reflection/Evaluation Keeley Books

9 Targets Develop a deeper understanding of and plan to implement strategies of formative assessment Analyze an assessment task to determine if it will provide an opportunity for students to produce defensible evidence of intended understanding Reach consensus on the intent of KCAS by exploring the necessity of scientific argument in the K-12 classroom

10 TUTORIAL AT It is the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed. - Charles Darwin Pgs 12-15

11 THE INFORMAL EDUCATOR SCIENCE HUB

12 HTTPS://DOCS.GOOGLE.COM/FORMS/D/1UOCNTEV6GHVOOGKNUCZXS7A_ GD7GDXOLC7AXVCIYCFC/VIEWFORM?C=0&W=1&USP=MAIL_FORM_LINK

13 JOIN PROFESSIONAL LIST SERVES AT U/LISTS/KYLISTS.PHP U/LISTS/KYLISTS.PHP

14 NGSS Evidence Statements Executive Summary of the Front Matter Overview HOT OFF THE PRESS!

15 NGSS Evidence Statements Executive Summary of the Front Matter Overview The NGSS identify assessable performance expectations (PEs), or what students should know and be able to do at the end of instruction. Each PE represents the integration of three “dimensions” of science education: scientific and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas (DCIs), and crosscutting concepts (CCCs). As such, both student learning and assessment around the NGSS should be “three dimensional”. The evidence statements are meant to show what it looks like for students to fully satisfy the PE.

16

17 Evidence Statement

18 PDF’s for Evidence Statements can be found under NGSS tab at K-8 coming soon!

19 ALSO HOT OFF THE PRESS! Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards

20 The Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards gives recommendations for the major elements needed to be considered when implementing NGSS: Instruction Teacher and Leader Learning Curriculum Materials Assessment Collaboration, Networks and Partnerships Policy and Communication Those who should read this report are district/school leaders and teachers charged with developing and implementing NGSS

21 The report addresses 7 overarching principles that can help guide planning: Attend to coherence across levels (state, district, schools), across grades, and across different components of the system (instruction, professional learning, curriculum, and assessment) Attend to what is unique about science Develop and provide continuing support for leadership in science at the state, district, and school levels Build and leverage collaborations, networks, and partnerships Take enough time to implement well Make equity a priority Ensure that communication is ongoing and relevant

22 Kentucky Leadership Networks The Purpose of the Networks is to: Provide equal representation to all school districts (i.e., a ‘senate’ model) to contribute to setting the statewide expectations for and implementation of new standards and assessments Build capacity at the DISTRICT level to understand Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards and their implications for instruction and assessment Create a professional learning community of content and administrator leaders Build the capacity of every member to identify and implement highly effective teaching, learning and assessment practices around Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards Provide the leadership skills, tools, resources necessary for all members to  break down or deconstruct standards into clear learning targets  design/recognize high-quality formative and summative assessments  plan/identify rigorous and congruent learning experiences for instruction  select evidence-based strategies and resources to enhance instruction  support other educators in their districts as they do these same processes

23 The Purpose of the Networks is NOT to: Disseminate finished products created by others Create an opportunity to merely comply with EILA or PD hour requirements Be out of the school/district for a day to “hear from” the KDE Practice a packaged lesson/presentation that is intended to be replicated in every classroom/school (‘train the trainer’ model) Focus on test preparation at the expense of effective instruction

24 Participants in the networks will: Commit to preparing for and attending every session (8 full days per year) Work to understand the standards deeply, then use that understanding to deconstruct them into learning targets Work toward becoming assessment literate Develop common assessments (formative and summative) from these targets Explore how best to implement this learning in own their school/district Participate on a district leadership team, utilizing new knowledge and resources, to plan an effective model for scaling up the work in their own district—and then enacting that plan

25 Participants in the networks will NOT: Develop practice assessments that are unconnected to new standards Be passive recipients of information and resources Implement a ‘programmed’ PD regimen (‘train the trainer’ model) Focus on test preparation at the expense of effective instruction (For additional information, visit: and search Unbridled Learning Summit)www.education.ky.gov

26 General principle: The purpose of a good discussion is to work with others to come up with the best set of ideas or ways to deal with a situation. In an argument or a debate, only one side wins. In a good discussion, everybody wins! Think before you speak. Listen carefully to what others have to say. Do not interrupt when some one else is speaking. Make use of what others have to say when it is your turn to speak. Only say what you truly believe. Do not remain silent. Make sure to contribute to the discussion. Let other people speak. Do not hog the discussion. Once you are done speaking, let at least two other people talk before you speak again. Support good ideas that other people have, even if they are different from your own. Search for the best solution even if it is different from the way that you thought at first. Norms for Discussion

27 WHY DOES EDUCATION MATTER?

28 WHY do we care about student achievement? Shoulder talk with the person closest to you, referring back to the materials you looked at earlier Each small group share their top three with the rest of your table As a table, using the discussion norms, come to consensus as to WHY we care about student achievement.

29 How do we get there? If we all agree education is crucial, then how do you get the most bang for your buck?

30 How do we get there? Go to the card that you think has made the most difference. As a group, at your card, talk and decide why you think this is the best approach to an effective classroom and be prepared to share out

31 What is Formative Assessment?

32 Formative Assessment Students and teachers Using evidence of learning To adapt teaching and learning To meet immediate learning needs Minute-to-minute and day-by-day From Content then Process by Dylan Wiliam

33 5 Strategies of FA 1.Clarifying learning intentions and sharing criteria for success 2.Engineering effective classroom discussions, questions, and learning tasks that elicit evidence of learning 3.Providing feedback that moves learning forward 4.Activating students as the owners of their own learning 5.Activating students as instructional resources for one another

34 Unpacking Formative Assessment Dylan Wiliam

35 IT SAYS…I SAY… Classroom Assessment: Minute by Minute, Day by Day Educational Leadership, Nov 2005

36 Take a few moments to read the article, dividing up the numbered sections at your table in a Jigsaw As you read, fill in both columns with the key elements for your “assessment FOR learning” strategy and a personal connection or reaction As a group, discuss each section; using the explanation of others/discussion with others to complete the remainder of both columns

37 Connecting 5 Strategies to PGES

38 Remember: there is no such thing as a ‘formative TEST’ – formative refers to a PROCESS/a set of instructional PRACTICES to SUPPORT student learning and growth…for example, MAP Tests are NOT ‘formative’—they are interim or benchmark tests) Reminder: The definition in SB 1 is: Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.

39 Grade Bands Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 K-5 K-5 Side Hallway FormativeAssessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment HS Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Breakout Sessions

40 STUDENT LESSON DEVELOPMENT

41 Grade Bands Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 K-5 K-5 Side Hallway FormativeAssessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment HS Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Breakout Sessions

42 FACTS Debbie Waggoner KDE/CKEC Instructional Specialist

43 PROVIDE FEEDBACK NOVEMBER focus on: PROVIDE FEEDBACK #5 CCC-Collaborative Clued Corrections pgs #23 Guided Reciprocal Peer Questioning pgs #26 Interest Scale pgs #41 Pass the Question pgs #53 Scientists’ Ideas Comparison pgs #70 Two Stars and a Wish pgs Go around your table and give each person 2-3minutes to share: 1.Which FACT did you try in your classroom? 2.How did it go? What went well? What would you do differently next time? 3.How did you use the results of the FACT to inform and adjust your instruction? Formal Concept Development and Transfer: OCTOBER focus on: Formal Concept Development and Transfer: #3 Annotated Student Drawings pgs53-56 #6 Chain Notes pgs62-64 #8 Concept Card Mapping pgs68-70 #20 Frayer Model pgs #35 Missed Conception pgs #51 Representation Analysis pgs #75 Whiteboarding pgs

44 PEER AND SELF ASSESSMENT #12 Explanation Analysis pgs79-82 Explanation Analysis encourages self and peer assessment of students ability to both construct and analyze a well- crafted scientific explanation. Teachers and students constructively critique scientific explanations for accuracy and inclusion of key components that distinguish scientific explanations from other types of explanations: the claim, appropriate and sufficient evidence, and reasoning that links the evidence to the claim using a scientific principle A Chemical Reaction Assessment Item required students to analyze a data table to answer the following: Write a scientific explanation that states whether a chemical reaction occurred when Carlos stirred and heated butanic acid and butanol.

45 Use the rubric below to analyze the four samples of student work.

46 Student work sample A Student work sample B

47 Student work sample C Student work sample D

48 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES (FACTS): 75 STRATEGIES LISTED ON PGS Peer and Self Assessment JANUARY focus on: Peer and Self Assessment #12 Explanation Analysis pgs79-82 (already discussed) #33 Learning Goals and Self Inventory pgs #36 Muddiest Point pgs #65 Traffic Light Cards pgs #67 Traffic Light Dots pgs #71 Two-Thirds Testing pgs JIGSAW - Divide up the other 5 FACTs (33, 36, 65, 67, 71) listed above at your table. Read your assigned FACTs and be ready to summarize it for your table group. HOMEWORK: HOMEWORK: TRY one FACT from the PEER and SELF ASSESSMENT FEBRUARY PEER and SELF ASSESSMENT category with your students before our FEBRUARY meeting

49 Grade Bands Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 K-5 K-5 Side Hallway FormativeAssessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment HS Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Breakout Sessions

50 These were pulled together with other teachers’ questions from across the state. From that, the Assessment Task Evaluation Protocol was developed; this is still in DRAFT format.

51 Assessment Task Evaluation Protocol Draft 1.Use writing to demonstrate thinking 2.Are SEP and CCC included specific to the PE at the appropriate depth and congruency? 3.Be sure to check assessment boundary statements 4.Is it congruent vs “correlated’? Check verbiage and language. 5.Revise item after getting student work 6.Would a rubric be appropriate for the item/task? 7.Which of the 3 dimensions is it measuring? 8.Does it measure 2 in a way that’s effective in meeting the intent? 9.What is the intent of the PE? (paying critical attention to thinking,CCC, SEP) 10.Different protocols for different types of tasks? (m/c, erq, performance task) 11.Different protocols for different assessment purposes? 12.Draw from multiple experiences/multiple sources of information? 13.Is the task the “best way” to measure what I’m trying to get evidence of? 14.What are common misconceptions and does the task get evidence to determine if the misconceptions still exist? Turn and talk about this draft protocol; does it address the elements of an effective item/task?

52 USING THE DRAFT ASSESSMENT TASK EVALUATION PROTOCOL Analyze the item ______________ Be prepared to share your analysis. Make note of additional questions that bubbled up during the analysis for revision of the protocol. Share an assessment item you brought for the table team to analyze.

53 WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU ASK WHEN DETERMINING IF A LESSON IDEA SUPPORTS THE INTENT OF NGSS? HOW WOULD YOU MODIFY THE PROTOCOL WE USED FOR ASSESSMENT TO HELP YOU ANALYZE LESSON IDEAS? How could you modify the assessment protocol for use with lesson ideas?

54 Creating an Assessment Item/Task

55 Grade Bands Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 K-5 K-5 Side Hallway FormativeAssessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Main Room Assessment Item Review Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment HS Front Room Student Lesson Development Side Hallway Formative Assessment Main Room Assessment Item Review Breakout Sessions

56 Scientific Inquiry in Schools Consider for a minute how you might explain scientific inquiry for K-12 students How does your concept compare to this process? – Asking a question – Devising a means to collect data – Interpreting the data – Formulating a conclusion What skills would students need to be successful with this approach to inquiry? Problems with this “skills” approach? Is it because it is “skills based?” Why did “we” go down this path?

57 What is our GOAL for having students engage in inquiry? Reasoned thinking by students – constructing scientific explanations / argumentation What’s important if that’s the goal? The QUALITY of argument becomes the focus. The result is students evaluating and critiquing… Previous “skills” are developed for different reasons Genuine engagement!

58 Turn the page over… Read the passage…. Underline any “skills that inquiry develops in students” as you read Argumentation… WHY is that an effective approach to student learning? Inquiry vs. Practices – why “we” arrived at “practices” -- consider the implications for other unintended consequences in education.

59 Generate an Argument Instructional Model

60 The Teacher Identifies the Task and Question Consider where learning experience falls instructionally (Natural Selection review) Share process of argumentation Share success criteria Share details of task & research question

61 Natural Selection Review Individuals in a population have traits that vary Traits may be an advantage / disadvantage to survival – depends on environment Traits are heritable – passed to offspring Individuals with favorable traits produce more offspring than individuals with non-favorable traits So, over time, the favorable traits are more common within a population Consider where learning experience falls instructionally Share process of argumentation Share success criteria Share details of task

62 Natural Selection Image obtained from University of California Museum of Paleontology's Understanding Evolution (http://evolution.berkeley.edu)

63 Argumentation Process Construct initial claim in 4 person group (20 min) Round-robin rotation (10 min) – One Informer stays at table – 2-3 Travelers – Rotate twice (4 min each rotation) Refine argument with base group (10 min) Reflective discussion (5-10 min) Written argument Consider where learning experience falls instructionally Share process of argumentation Share success criteria Share details of task

64 Components of an Argument Consider where learning experience falls instructionally Share process of argumentation Share success criteria Share details of task

65 Example of HS Student Argument

66 Success Criteria for Argument StrongModerateWeak Claim A concise response that accurately answers the research question without irrelevant information. Provides a correct claim but includes some irrelevant, incomplete, or inaccurate information OR Confuses the foundation explanatory response with other, perhaps indirect or dependent phenomena. Does not answer the research question Evidence (a)Effectively (helpful format) presents relevant specific data (can include graphs, numbers, descriptions, etc.) (b)Connects those data to particular claim(s) or pieces of the claim (c)Includes all available relevant evidence (a)NOT effective presentation of relevant specific data (e.g. wrong format) OR non-specific data (e.g. “went up”) (b)Data connection to claim tenuous or ill-formed (c)Includes some of the available relevant evidence OR includes a minor amount of irrelevant evidence (a)No direct reference to specific data (b)Connections of data to particular claim(s) not effectively made (c)Incorrect or Irrelevant evidence used OR substantial amount of this mixed with relatively minor amount of helpful evidence Justification(a)Clear logical connections between evidence and claim offered (b)Explicit and correct reference to underlying science principles (c)Nuances addressed when appropriate (e.g. interaction of variables, limitations of data range or applicability) (a)Implied or incomplete connection between evidence and claim (b)Incomplete reference to appropriate underlying science principles (c)Incomplete justification (e.g. missing some relevant evidence or logical connections) (a)No reasonable connections between evidence and claim (b)Inaccurate or absence of reference to underlying science principles (c)Substantial amounts of relevant evidence overlooked OR inappropriate evidence used

67 What causes the color trends in the guppies? Consider where learning experience falls instructionally Share process of argumentation Share success criteria Share details of task & research question

68 Generate an Argument Instructional Model

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70 Argumentation Process Construct initial claim in 4 person group (20 min) Round-robin rotation (10 min) – One Informer stays at table – 2-3 Travelers – Rotate twice (4 min each rotation) Refine argument with base group (10 min) Reflective discussion (5-10 min) Written argument (skip)

71 Specific Roles during Rotations – Informer: stay at table and explains initial claim and reasoning; carefully considers questions posed – no defending the claim at this point. – Travelers: listen to the explanation (all three rotate to the same table) and pose questions for clarity – no telling your group’s ideas

72 Generate an Argument Instructional Model

73 How does argumentation lead to deeper learning? Assessment for Learning (Wiliam & Thompson) 1. Clarifying learning intentions and sharing criteria for success 2. Engineering effective classroom discussions, questions, and learning tasks that elicit evidence of learning 3. Providing feedback that moves learning forward 4. Activating students as the owners of their own learning 5. Activating students as instructional resources for one another

74 Guppy Debriefing, continued… Brainstorm specific pieces of evidence of student learning in ALL three dimensions Compare rubric from Argumentation book (appendix B) with the Success Criteria shared at the beginning Consider “Teacher Behaviors” (Table 1) (read right column – which will you have most trouble with? read left column…)

75 Guppy Debriefing, continued… Brainstorm topics you teach or data sets to which you could apply the argumentation process – we’d like to create resources to share for all grade levels

76 Go back to the “Minute-by-Minute, Day-by-Day article and discuss at your table: Which of the 5 strategies were prevalent in this experience? How and why is argumentation important for student learning? How can you use this at your grade level/content area? Was the success criteria useful? How can it be better? How could this have been better facilitated? What are the challenges of implementing this strategy?

77 Plan…Do…Review How will you share the information from today? Page 11

78 One set per district; whoever takes them must sign for them

79

80 Terry Rhodes KDE/CKEC CKEC Science Content Network Meetings Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014 Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014 Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015 Wednesday, Mar. 25, 2015 Don’t forget the Evaluation!


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