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+ CKEC Instructional Support Leadership Network October 16 th, 2014 Today’s materials can be accessed at:

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Presentation on theme: "+ CKEC Instructional Support Leadership Network October 16 th, 2014 Today’s materials can be accessed at:"— Presentation transcript:

1 + CKEC Instructional Support Leadership Network October 16 th, 2014 Today’s materials can be accessed at: oct-2014-isln.html oct-2014-isln.html oct-2014-isln.html

2 + CKEC ISLN Facilitation Team Debbie Waggoner Debbie Waggoner, KDE/CKEC Instructional Specialist – Math & Social Studies Emphasis Kelly Philbeck Kelly Philbeck, KDE Literacy/LDC Mike Cassady, Mike Cassady, PGES Consultant CKEC/KDE Terry Rhodes, Terry Rhodes, KDE/CKEC Instructional Specialist – Science Emphasis Cherry Boyles, Instructional Supervisor, Washington County Schools Rebecca Woosley Rebecca Woosley, Effectiveness Coach, KDE

3 + Learning Teaching Enhancing Supporting Sharing

4 + Norms Be an ambassador of “lifelong learning.” Show your enthusiasm for the work, support the learning of others, be willing to take risks, participate fully. Come to meetings prepared. Be on time, any preparations/ readings completed, with necessary materials. Be focused during meetings. Stick to network goals/ targets, use technology to enhance work at hand, limit sidebar conversations. Work collaboratively. All members’ contributions are valued and honored, seek first to understand, then be understood.

5 + ISLN Meeting IMPORTANT NOTES What do I want to remember? How will I use this information, and how will I share it with others in my district? PINK Sheet Also don’t forget your YELLOW Evaluation sheet We Need your FEEDBACK!

6 + CKEC ISLN October 16 th, 2015 Meeting AGENDA -Welcome, Introduction, District Team Reflection Review -Authentic Use of Data – Data, Data, Data article and Video Interview with guiding questions – Cherry Boyles Concurrent Sessions: Social Studies Update – Teaching Kids to Ask Their Own Questions Review/Preview Social Studies Network Meeting – Debbie Waggoner Science Update – 3D Science Lesson Plan Development Review/Preview Science Network Meeting – Terry Rhodes PGES Update – Using Multiple Sources of Evidence to Establish Baseline data for Student Growth Goals – Becky Woosley & Kelly Philbeck -PGES Review of Resources – Mike Cassady -District Action Plan – Cherry Boyles -Meeting Evaluation Today’s Agenda Inside Cover

7 Pillars again Highly Effective Teaching and learning Assessment Literacy Leadership Kentucky’s Core Academic Standards TPGES –Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System CKEC ISLN GOAL : Build the capacity of district leadership teams to support the implementation of PGES, KCAS, effective leadership, effective teaching and assessment literacy through strategies and resources.

8 + District Team Reflection Review Packet page 1

9 + Data…Data…Data: From Triangulation to Student Growth Packet pages 2-6

10 + Listening to Teacher Voices Packet page 2

11 + Concurrent Sessions DISTRICTS Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 A-F A-F Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update G-O G-O Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update P-Z P-Z Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update

12 + Student Growth Goal-Setting Scenario Rebecca Woosley, Effectiveness Coach Kelly Philbeck, LDC/ELA Instructional Specialist Oct. 16, 2014

13 + Today’s Targets the process (HOW the teacher collected and used data for SG) the decisions the teacher made (WHAT he did) the rationale (WHY he made those decisions)

14 + Let’s look at a social studies scenario Mr. Diamond, a World History teacher at Ben Franklin High School

15 + Step 1: Determining Needs Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether the student achieved the goals

16 + What did Mr. Diamond’s PLC do first? Enduring Learning – ENDURES beyond a single test date is of value in other disciplines is relevant beyond the classroom is worthy of embedded, course-long focus may be necessary for the next level of instruction

17 + Enduring Skills/Learning Mr. Diamond’s PLC identified: Construct compelling and supporting questions to develop inquiry skills Use evidence to support a claim Evaluate the credibility of sources Communicate conclusions to a range of audiences Critique own work as well as the work of others Take informed action

18 + Determining the baseline and growth measure What did Mr. Diamond plan to use for his baseline data and growth measure? How did he arrive at the decision?

19 + LDC Classroom Assessment Allows for pre-assessment baseline data using one of the LDC rubrics Allows formative and end of year post- assessment data Uses the same template as the teaching task in the LDC module

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21 + Scoring Elements Not Yet 1 Approaches Expectations 2 Meets Expectations 3 Advanced 4 Focus0%15%80%5% Controlling Idea30%66%3%0% Reading/ Research 13%73%13%0% Development33% 0% Organization0%10%90%0% Conventions15% 65%5% Content Understanding 10%15%75%0% LDC Classroom Assessment Task (Results of the first LDC Classroom Assessment Task)

22 + Instructional LadderMeets Expectations Preparing for the Task100% Reading Process45% Transition to Writing40% Writing Planning & Development 40% Revision and Editing30% Assessments from Instructional Ladder of the 1st LDC Module

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26 + Step 2: Creating the Student Growth Goal Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether the student achieved the goals The teacher creates a student growth goal built on the baseline data collected and analyzed in Step 1.

27 + Goal … a statement of an intended outcome of your work: Student Learning Distinct from Strategies Strategies = Means Goal = End (the intended outcome) What is a Student Growth Goal?

28 Kentucky Department of Education Professional Growth and Effectiveness System Student Growth Goals Basics… SMART goal Proficiency component & Growth component One classroom of students, one content area Specific, Measureable, Appropriate, Realistic, Time- Bound ___% of students will reach the level of proficiency as determined by… All of my students will grow at least _____. 3 rd Grade math students 1 st period 7 th grade language arts students 6 th period high school concert band students 3 rd Grade math students 1 st period 7 th grade language arts students 6 th period high school concert band students

29 + Mr. Diamond’s SGG For the current school year, all of the 10 th grade world history students in my 3 rd block class will make measurable progress in the enduring skill, use evidence to support a claim. All students will move up at least 1 level in each of the three scoring elements and 75% of students will achieve at the 3 or higher level on the controlling idea, reading/research, and development areas of the LDC Argumentation Rubric.

30 + Step 3: Creating & Implementing Strategies (What skills/instruction?) Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether the student achieved the goals

31 + Start by deciding on instructional strategies for goal attainment 19

32 + Carefully chosen strategies are … supported by research supported by research developmentally appropriate developmentally appropriate appropriate for the subject matter appropriate for the subject matter 20

33 + Some Places to Look PD 360 Teaching Channel LDC Core Tools Other teacher experts, coaches

34 + Coming in November... Step 4: Monitoring Student Progress and Making Adjustments Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether the student achieved the goals

35 + Concurrent Sessions DISTRICTS Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 A-F A-F Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update G-O G-O Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update P-Z P-Z Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update

36 UPDATES Terry Rhodes Regional Science Network Instructional Specialist Cell: Web: Packet pages 7-12

37 CKEC Alternate Aligned Science Standards Plan 2014 – 2015 Sally Miracle & Terry Rhodes Hold summer trainings on the new science standards – the same info would be presented at both sessions to allow teachers to attend either date. Have all teachers together (do not separate by levels) Present to teachers on the progressions  What is the progression assessing  The deconstructed standards/progressions  2 – 3 hands on experiences for each aligned standard in each progression  Resources for each progression Videos, Books, Works samples, websites, etc. Give them an Alternate Aligned Science Vocabulary dictionary

38 Alternate Science Standards Progressions Earth Science 4-ESS2-16-ESS2-4 HS-ESS2-5 Engineering and Technology 3-5-ETS1-1MS-ETS1-1 HS-ETS1-3 Life Science 1 3LS1-17-LS1-5 HS-LS4-5 Life Science 2 3LS4-36-LS2-2 HS-LS2-6 Physical Science 1 2-PS1-17-PS1-2 HS-PS1-2 Physical Science2 3-PS2-26-PS2-2 HS-PS2-3

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42 Gathering Reasoning Communicating Obtain Information Ask Questions/Define Problems Plan & Carry Out Investigations Use Models to Gather Data Use Mathematics & Computational Thinking Evaluate Information Analyze Data Use Mathematics and Computational Thinking Construct Explanations/Solve Problems Developing Arguments from Evidence Use Models to Predict & Develop Evidence Communicate Information Using Argue from Evidence (written/oral) Use Models to Communicate (Moulding, 2012) Packet pages 7-12

43 Lesson Plan Idea Template

44 Sample Lesson Plan Idea

45 October KSLN  Article-”This is not a lesson plan”  Reflections on Lesson Plan Ideas implemented since last meeting  Waves 3-Dimensional Lesson Idea  Looking at assessments through 3-D lens  Designing Assessments  Science Formative Assessments

46 + Seven Essential Skills for Today’s Students Critical thinking and problem-solving Collaboration Agility and adaptability Initiative and entrepreneurialism Effective oral and written communication Accessing and analyzing information Curiosity and imagination

47 Attribute As a table, look at the attributes and discuss reflection questions in terms of the attributes…how can we make the shift to equipping our students for success in the classroom and beyond?

48 Packet page 12

49 + Concurrent Sessions DISTRICTS Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 A-F A-F Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update G-O G-O Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update P-Z P-Z Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update

50 + Debbie Waggoner KDE Regional Instructional Specialist Social Studies & Mathematics CKEC ISLN Social Studies UPDATE October 2014 Packet pages 13-23

51 + Projected Timeline At A Glance… September 2014 Targeted Focus Groups October 2014 First Read KBE and compile feedback November 2014 Representative sub-group of standards writers will meet to review Feedback and Refine Draft December 2014 Second Read January 2015 Public Comment Period Implementation

52 + Focus on Inquiry enhances classroom practice…

53 + THE QUESTION FORMULATION TECHNIQUE (QFT) Students' Questions as a Catalyst for: Deeper Learning, Joy in Teaching and a Healthier Democracy Based on the Keynote presentation for Ky Council of Social Studies Conference September 2014 Erlanger, KY By Dan Rothstein The Right Question Institute: Cambridge, MA

54 + The Big Idea Students are more successful when they learn to ask their own questions

55 + The Vision: High School Students in Boston, MA “When you ask the question, you feel like it’s your job to get the answer.” ENGAGEMENT!

56 +  A Question Focus  Rules for Producing Questions  Producing Questions  Categorizing Questions-Open/Closed  Prioritizing Questions  Next Steps  Reflection Components of the Question Formulation Technique TM Packet pages 13-15

57 + Rules for Producing Questions Ask as many questions as you can. Do not stop to answer, judge, or discuss. Write down every question exactly as it was stated. Change any statements into questions. Packet pages 16-17

58 + Experiencing the Question Formulation Technique TM

59 + Question Focus Some students are not asking questions in my classroom Packet pages 16-17

60 + Producing Questions Some students are not asking questions in my classroom 1. Ask Questions 2. Follow the Rules 3. Number the Questions Packet pages 16-17

61 + Categorizing Questions: Closed/Open Definitions: Closed-ended questions can be answered with a “yes” or “no” or with a one-word answer. Open-ended questions require more explanation. Directions: Identify your questions as closed- ended or open-ended by marking them with a “C” or an “O”.

62 + Discussion

63 + Change Closed to Open and Open to Closed -Ended Questions Directions: Take one closed-ended question and change it into an open- ended question

64 + Prioritizing Questions Review your list of questions Choose the three questions you consider most important. While prioritizing, think about your QFocus: Some students are not asking questions in my classroom

65 + Prioritizing Questions Why did you choose those three questions as the most important? Where are your priority questions in the sequence of your entire list of questions?

66 + Share 1. Questions you changed from closed to open 2. Your three priority questions and their numbers in your original sequence 3. Rationale for choosing priority questions

67 + Reflection What did you learn? How did you learn it? What do you understand differently now about asking questions?

68 + Classroom Example: Secondary Teacher: Megan Harvell, Boston, MA Topic: American History –The Civil War Purpose: Pre-reading activity to engage students Question Focus:

69 + Student Questions 1. Why are they fighting? 2. Are they fighting? 3. Are they part of the government? 4. Where were they? 5. Who are they? 6. Were they signing anything? 7. Who else was there? 8. Why are you hitting him? 9. Why didn’t they call 911? 10. Was this related to slavery? 11. Why is he hitting him with a bat? 11. Why are you taking a pen? 12. Why are they in court? 13. Who hit who first? 15. Who died? 16. Why are they smiling?

70 + 1. Why are they fighting? 2. Are they fighting? 3. Are they part of the government? 4. Where were they? 5. Who are they? 6. Were they signing anything? 7. Who else was there? 8. Why are you hitting him? 9. Why didn’t they call 911? 10. Was this related to slavery? 11. Why is he hitting him with a bat? 11. Why are you taking a pen? 12. Why are they in court? 13. Who hit who first? 15. Who died? 16. Why are they smiling? Compelling Questions “Focus on enduring issues and concerns. They deal with curiosities about how things work; interpretations and applications of disciplinary concepts; and unresolved issues that require students to construct arguments in response.” C3 Framework p.23 Supporting Questions “Focus on descriptions, definitions, and processes on which there is general agreement within the social studies disciplines, and require students to construct explanations that advance claims of understanding in response” C3 Framework p.23 C3 Dimension 1

71 + Educator Observations Novice Teachers “I’ve never seen my students so engaged as when they are using the QFT.” Veteran Teachers “I’ve prided myself in my 33 years of teaching in the good questions I ask of my students. But, I saw that they go through this process and they ask great questions that I never, ever would have thought of.” University Professors “I have been stunned by the depth and breadth of questions that my students have created during QFT sessions – and I feel that I am just beginning to learn how to use the technique.”

72 + The Skill of Asking Questions For getting to better answers For increasing engagement and ownership For demonstrating inquiry in the classroom For a little more joy in a very demanding profession And…

73 + The Research Confirms the Importance of Student Questioning Self-Questioning (metacognitive strategy): Students formulating their own questions proved to be one of the most effective metacognitive strategies Engaging in pre-lesson self-questioning improved students rate of learning by nearly 50% (Hattie, p.193) Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement by John Hattie. 1 st Edition, December 26, 2008.

74 + Tools for QFT Tips for Facilitating the QFT – Question Formulation Technique packet pages Designing the Question Focus packet pages Assessing Facilitation of the QFT packet page 22 QFT on one page packet page 23 Also on the Agenda… Design a Question Focus to try the QFT for your grade level Reading Strategies for Social Studies 21 st Century Curriculum Implications and district planning Burning Questions about the Disciplinary Content Strands

75 + Concurrent Sessions DISTRICTS Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 A-F A-F Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update G-O G-O Main Room Social Studies Network Update Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update P-Z P-Z Front Room Science Network update Side Hallway PGES Update Main Room Social Studies Network Update

76 + PGES ROAD MAP TO RESOURCES

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78 Student Voice Survey Windows For the SY, there are Fall and Spring Student Voice Survey windows available to gather student perception. The Fall window occurs from November 3rd through November 21st. The Spring window occurs from March 4th through March 25th. Districts may elect to participate in one or both survey windows.

79 + Self-Reflection and PGP By now self-reflection and PGP should be completed by teachers Self-reflection and PGP entered into CIITS by teachers Teachers should reflect throughout year (two additional windows) PGP should be part of mid-year review

80 + Next Steps: Next Steps: Leadership Team Commitments Packet page 24 and Blue sheet for your district

81 + We need your feedback! Please complete the yellow evaluation before you leave. We need your feedback!

82 + CKEC Instructional Support Leadership Network NorthEast Christian Church 8:30am-12:30pm Thurs. Sept. 18 th, 2014 Thurs. Oct. 16 th, 2014 Thurs. Nov. 20 th, 2014 Thurs. Jan. 22nd, 2015 Thurs. Feb. 19th, 2015 Thurs. Mar. 19 th, 2015 Thurs. Sept. 18 th, 2014 Thurs. Oct. 16 th, 2014 Thurs. Nov. 20 th, 2014 Thurs. Jan. 22nd, 2015 Thurs. Feb. 19th, 2015 Thurs. Mar. 19 th, 2015 MAKE UP DATE Thurs. Apr. 16 th, 2015 See you next month on November 20 th !


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