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Math Content Network Update The Power of Mistakes Student Engagement Culture of Learning Growth Mindset Congruent Tasks.

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Presentation on theme: "Math Content Network Update The Power of Mistakes Student Engagement Culture of Learning Growth Mindset Congruent Tasks."— Presentation transcript:

1 Math Content Network Update The Power of Mistakes Student Engagement Culture of Learning Growth Mindset Congruent Tasks

2 Math Content Network Follow-Up I.Implement a Formative Assessment Lesson a.Bring back 5-10 pieces of student work (pre & post assessments) II.Collect evidence showcasing formative assessment strategies 2, 4, or 5. a.Can be in the form of student work, lesson outline, data collected, pictures, videos, etc.

3 ELA Content Network Update I.Congruent Classroom Assessment Items II.Text-Dependent Questions III.LDC – What Results? Scoring Student Work IV.TPGES 3c – Student Engagement V.Narrative Writing What can you expect your content teachers to know? Content Specialists’ Services

4 Measuring Student Growth

5 Domain 1: Planning & Preparation Domain 2: Classroom Environment Domain 3: Instruction Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Domain 5: Student Growth

6 Proposed Multiple Measures Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System Observation Peer Observation formative Professional Growth Reflective Practice Student Voice Student Growth All measures are supported through evidence. State Contribution: Student Growth % Local Contribution: Student Growth Goals

7 within the Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System (TPGES) Student Growth

8 Targets  I can explain why student growth goals are included in the new teacher effectiveness system.  I can communicate and support the student growth goal setting process.  I can identify the current status of implementation of student growth goals in my district/school and use available resources to determine next steps.

9 Why Measure Student Growth?

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11 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver

12 Past Evaluations Seniority High Level of Principal Input Degrees Earned

13 “If a goal of evaluating teachers is to ensure student learning, then student learning must be a major part of what’s measured.” ~MET Study

14 MET Study Suggests … Rigorous Classroom Observations Student Feedback School Working Conditions Pedagogical Content Knowledge Student Growth MET Study

15 Proposed Multiple Measures Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System Observation Peer Observation formative Professional Growth Self Reflection Student Voice Student Growth All measures are supported through evidence. State Contribution: Student Growth % Local Contribution: Student Growth Goals

16 Student Growth Measures in Kentucky’s Field Test State Contribution Student Growth Percentiles – applies to grades 4 – 8 reading & math Local Contribution Student Growth Goal – applies to all teachers

17 Student Growth Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

18 Step 1 Determining Needs Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

19 Determining Needs Step one begins with looking at data to get to know your students Previous years’ data Conversations with previous teachers Formative assessment processes Student work This is not Baseline data used for developing a student growth goal

20 Getting Baseline Data Once you know your students … Decide upon an assessment that can provide pre-, mid-course, and post-assessment data

21 Step 2 Creating Goals Using the SMART Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

22 SMART Goal Process S Specific- The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. M Measurable- An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. The goal is measurable and uses an appropriate instrument. A Appropriate- The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. The goal is standards-based and directly related to the subject and students that the teacher teaches. R Realistic- The goal is attainable. The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. T Time-bound- The goal is contained to a single school year/course. The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment.

23 Student Growth Goal Sample Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: % 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

24 Includes All Students The goal addresses growth for all students in the classroom Based on Over-arching concepts The goal addresses growth in over-arching skills/concepts of the content vs. simply knowledge of content

25 You need to KNOW your students in order to critique the goal.

26 Step 3 Creating and Implementing Strategies Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

27 Step 4 Monitoring Student Progress and Making Adjustments Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

28 Monitoring Student Progress Monitor both student progress toward goal attainment AND strategy effectiveness through formative assessment processes Make adjustments to strategies as needed Goals are not adjusted; Strategies are adjusted

29 Step 5 Determining Goal Attainment Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

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31 Building Skills to Support the Student Growth Process Are teachers and administrators skillful collaborators? Can teachers write measurable goals focused on student learning? Are teachers knowledgeable about the instructional and leadership practices that will have the greatest impact on the achievement of their goals? Do teachers know how to measure or assess the effectiveness of those practices? Do teachers know how to analyze student and system data? Can teachers adjust their practices in ways that will better serve their particular population of learners?

32 Continuing the Conversation Supporting Student Goal Setting Through Collaboration Looking Closer at Quality Goals and Appropriate Assessment

33 How can you deepen your understanding? Winter Summit Winter Summit – February 2013: Specific dates vary by location (Feb 5 th : BG; Feb 6 th : KDV) Other Research-Based Resources – The Power of SMART Goals: Using Goals to Improve Student Learning ( Jan O’Neill and Anne Conzemius) – Student Achievement Goal Setting: Using Data to Improve Teaching and Learning ( James Stronge and Leslie Grant)

34 KDE Resources – KDE Home Page TPGES Field Test District Page, -field-test-districts-.aspx -field-test-districts-.aspx TPGES Overview from Summer Trainings, --overview-series.aspx --overview-series.aspx CIITS/EDS Resources, https://powersource.pearsonschoolsystems.com/portal /ciits/pges-field-test/ https://powersource.pearsonschoolsystems.com/portal /ciits/pges-field-test/ Mean to an End means to and end templates (5).doc means to and end templates (5).doc

35 QUESTIONS

36 Contact Information Branch Manager, Office of Next Generation Professionals Effectiveness Coach, GRREC


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