Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

8 Receivables. 8-2 The term receivables includes all money claims against other entities, including people, business firms, and other organizations. 1.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "8 Receivables. 8-2 The term receivables includes all money claims against other entities, including people, business firms, and other organizations. 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 8 Receivables

2 8-2 The term receivables includes all money claims against other entities, including people, business firms, and other organizations. 1 Classification of Receivables

3 8-3 Accounts receivable are normally expected to be collected within a relatively short period, such as 30 or 60 days. 1 Classification of Receivables

4 8-4 Notes receivable are amounts that customers owe for which a formal, written instrument of credit has been issued. 1 Classification of Receivables

5 8-5 Other receivables expected to be collected within one year are classified as current assets. 1 Classification of Receivables

6 8-6 If collection is expected beyond one year, these receivables are classified as noncurrent assets and reported under the caption Investments. 1 Classification of Receivables

7 8-7 Companies often sell their receivables to other companies. This transaction is called factoring the receivables, and the buyer of the receivables is called a factor. 2 Factoring

8 8-8 Regardless of how careful a company is in granting credit, some credit sales will be uncollectible. The operating expense account is called bad debt expense, uncollectible accounts expense, or doubtful accounts expense. 2 Uncollectible Receivables

9 8-9 The direct write off method records bad debt expense only when an account is judged to be worthless. The allowance method records bad debt expense by estimating uncollectible accounts at the end of the accounting period. Uncollectible Receivables 2

10 8-10 Describe the direct write- off method of accounting for uncollectible receivables

11 8-11 On May 10, a $4,200 accounts receivable from D. L. Ross has been determined to be uncollectible. 3 Uncollectible Receivables

12 8-12 The amount written off is later collected on November Reinstatement EntryReceipt of Cash Entry Uncollectible Receivables

13 8-13 Describe the allowance method of accounting for uncollectible receivables

14 8-14 On December 31, ExTone Company estimates that a total of $30,000 of the $200,000 balance of their Accounts Receivable will eventually be uncollectible. 4 Uncollectible Receivables

15 8-15 The net amount that is expected to be collected, $170,000 ($200,000 – $30,000), is called the net realizable value (NRV). The adjusting entry reduces receivables to the NRV and matches uncollectible expenses with revenues. 4 Uncollectible Receivables

16 8-16 Write-Offs to the Allowance Account On January 21, John Parker’s account totaling $6,000 is written off because it is uncollectible. 4

17 8-17 4

18 8-18 During 2010, ExTone Company writes off $26,750 of uncollectible accounts, including the $6,000 account of John Parker. After posting all entries to write-off uncollectible amounts, Allowance for Doubtful Accounts will have a credit balance of $3,250 ($30,000 – $26,750). 4 Allowance Method Example

19 Allowance Method Example

20 8-20 If ExTone Company had written off $32,100 in accounts receivable during 2010, Allowance for Doubtful Accounts would have a debit balance of $2, Allowance Method Example

21 8-21 Nancy Smith’s account of $5,000 which was written off on April 2 is later collected on June 10. Two entries are needed: one to reinstate Nancy Smith’s account and a second to record receipt of the cash. 4 Allowance Method Example

22 8-22 Reinstatement EntryReceipt of Cash Entry 4 Allowance Method Example

23 8-23 Estimating Uncollectibles 2.Analysis of receivables method. The allowance method uses two ways to estimate the amount debited to Bad Debt Expense. 1.Percent of sales method. 4

24 8-24 Percent of Sales Method If credit sales for the period are $3,000,000 and it is estimated that ¾% will be uncollectible, Bad Debt Expense is debited for $22,500 ($3,000,000 ×.0075). This approach disregards the balance of $3,250 in the allowance account before the adjustment. 4

25 8-25 After the following adjusting entry on December 31 is posted, Allowance for Doubtful Accounts will have a balance of $25,750 ($3,250 + $22,500). 4 Percent of Sales Method

26 Percent of Sales Method

27 8-27 Aging of Receivables The longer an account receivable is outstanding, the less likely it is that it will be collected. Basing the estimate of uncollectible accounts on how long specific amounts have been outstanding is called aging the receivables. 4

28 Aging of Receivables Schedule December 31, 2010 Exhibit 1

29 8-29 The estimate based on receivables is compared to the balance in the allowance account to determine the amount of the adjusting entry. 4 Percent of Sales Method

30 8-30 ExTone has an unadjusted credit balance of $3,250 in Allowance for Doubtful Accounts. In Exhibit 1 the estimated uncollectible accounts totaled $26, Percent of Sales Method

31 8-31 The amount to be added to the allowance account is $23,240 ($26,490 – $3,250). The adjusting entry is as follows: 4 Percent of Sales Method

32 Percent of Sales Method

33 The Commercial Collection Agency Section of the Commercial Law League of America reported the following collection rates by number of months past due:

34 8-34 Percent of Sales Method If the unadjusted balance of the allowance account had been a debit balance of $2,100, the amount of the adjustment would have been $28,590. 4

35 Differences Between Estimation Methods Exhibit 2

36 8-36 Compare the direct write- off method and allowance method of accounting for uncollectible accounts

37 Comparing Direct Write-Off and Allowance Methods (continued) Exhibit 3

38 Direct Write-Off Method Allowance Method Comparing Direct Write-Off and Allowance Methods (continued) Exhibit 3

39 8-39 5

40 8-40 Describe the accounting for notes receivable

41 8-41 Characteristics of Notes Receivable (continued) The maker is the party making the promise to pay. A note receivable, or promissory note, is a written document containing a promise to pay: The payee is the party to whom the note is payable. The face amount is the amount the note is written for on its face. The issuance date is the date a note is issued. 6

42 8-42 Characteristics of Notes Receivable (continued) The term of the note is the amount of time between the issuance and due dates. The interest rate is that rate of interest that must be paid on the face amount for the term of the note. The due date or maturity date is the date the note is to be paid. 6

43 Promissory NoteExhibit 4

44 8-44 Accounting for Notes Receivable Received a $6,000, 12%, 30-day note dated November 21, 2010 in settlement of the account of W. A. Bunn Co. 6

45 8-45 On December 21, when the note matures, the firm receives $6,060 from W. A. Bunn Company ($6,000 plus $60 interest). 6 Accounting for Notes Receivable

46 8-46 If W. A. Bunn Company fails to pay the note on the due date, it is considered a dishonored note receivable. The note and interest are transferred to the customer’s account. 6 Accounting for Notes Receivable

47 8-47 A 90-day, 12% note dated December 1, 2010, is received from Crawford Company to settle its account, which has a balance of $4, Accounting for Notes Receivable

48 8-48 Assuming that the accounting period ends on December 31, an adjusting entry is required to record the accrued interest of $40 ($4,000 × 0.12 × 30/360). 6 Accounting for Notes Receivable

49 8-49 On March 1, 2011, $4,120 is received for the note ($4,000) and interest ($120). 6 Accounting for Notes Receivable


Download ppt "8 Receivables. 8-2 The term receivables includes all money claims against other entities, including people, business firms, and other organizations. 1."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google