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Inclusion: Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Foundation training for teaching assistants Day 2.

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Presentation on theme: "Inclusion: Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Foundation training for teaching assistants Day 2."— Presentation transcript:

1 Inclusion: Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Foundation training for teaching assistants Day 2

2 Education Act 1997 The contribution of TA’s is CENTRAL to successful SEN practice

3 The Medical Model of SEN Child is faultyChild is faulty DiagnosisDiagnosis LabellingLabelling Impairment becomes focus of attentionImpairment becomes focus of attention Assessment, monitoring, programmes of therapy imposedAssessment, monitoring, programmes of therapy imposed Segregation and alternative servicesSegregation and alternative services ordinary’ needs put on holdordinary’ needs put on hold

4 The Social Model of SEN Child is valuedChild is valued Strengths and needs defined by self and othersStrengths and needs defined by self and others Outcome based on programme designOutcome based on programme design Resources made available to ‘ordinary’ servicesResources made available to ‘ordinary’ services Training for parents and professionalsTraining for parents and professionals Relationships nurturedRelationships nurtured Diversity welcomedDiversity welcomed Society evolvesSociety evolves

5 Inclusion: does it matter where pupils are taught? (Ofsted 2006) Pupils in mainstream schools where support from teaching assistants was the main type of provision were less likely to make good academic progress than those who had access to specialist teaching in those schools.Pupils in mainstream schools where support from teaching assistants was the main type of provision were less likely to make good academic progress than those who had access to specialist teaching in those schools.

6 Workforce reform in schools: has it made a difference? An evaluation of changes made to the school workforce Ofsted, January 2010 Most Effective Practice All staff had a clear understanding of their own roles and those of others.All staff had a clear understanding of their own roles and those of others. Collaborative planning between teachers and support staff, a shared understanding of what constituted good learning, and the direct involvement of support staff in assessing and recording pupils’ progress led to more effective classroom support and intervention.Collaborative planning between teachers and support staff, a shared understanding of what constituted good learning, and the direct involvement of support staff in assessing and recording pupils’ progress led to more effective classroom support and intervention.

7 Workforce reform in schools: has it made a difference? An evaluation of changes made to the school workforce Ofsted, January 2010 When teaching assistants provided general support in class, they made less of a difference to pupils’ learning.When teaching assistants provided general support in class, they made less of a difference to pupils’ learning. In the most effective schools TAs worked with a range of pupils across the class so that none of the pupils became too reliant on support and lost the ability to work independently.In the most effective schools TAs worked with a range of pupils across the class so that none of the pupils became too reliant on support and lost the ability to work independently.

8 Workforce reform in schools: has it made a difference? An evaluation of changes made to the school workforce Ofsted, January 2010 There were still schools where the only briefings support staff received were during spare moments between lessons or through impromptu conversations in the staff room.There were still schools where the only briefings support staff received were during spare moments between lessons or through impromptu conversations in the staff room. The most effective leaders realised that structural changes in the workforce needed to be supported by a regular framework of meetings during which support staff could contribute to planning and provide feedback on pupils’ progress.The most effective leaders realised that structural changes in the workforce needed to be supported by a regular framework of meetings during which support staff could contribute to planning and provide feedback on pupils’ progress.

9 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Special Educational Needs Code of Practice for Wales

10 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE The SEN Code of Practice for Wales States that: ‘The child’s class teacher should remain responsible for working with the child on a daily basis and for planning and delivering an individualised programme.’

11 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE SEN Code of Practice A child with SEN should have their needs metA child with SEN should have their needs met These needs will normally be met in a mainstream settingThese needs will normally be met in a mainstream setting A child’s view should be soughtA child’s view should be sought Parents have a vital role to playParents have a vital role to play Children should be offered access to an appropriate curriculumChildren should be offered access to an appropriate curriculum

12 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE SEN Code of Practice Categories of Need There are no hard and fast categories but most pupils will fall into one of these main areas: communication and interactioncommunication and interaction cognition and learningcognition and learning behaviour, emotional and social developmentbehaviour, emotional and social development sensory and/or physicalsensory and/or physical

13 CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Individual Education Plans Should only contain what is additional to and different from the school’s differentiated curriculum planning for all pupilsShould only contain what is additional to and different from the school’s differentiated curriculum planning for all pupils 3 or 4 SMART short term targets set through discussion with the pupil and parents.3 or 4 SMART short term targets set through discussion with the pupil and parents. A description of the child’s strengths and areas for developmentA description of the child’s strengths and areas for development

14 Individual Education Plans Targets should be: S PECIFIC M EASURABLE A TTAINABLE R ELEVANT T IME CONSTRAINED

15 Individual Education Plans Also: A description of the child’s strengths and areas for developmentA description of the child’s strengths and areas for development Screening and Baseline dataScreening and Baseline data Teaching strategies to be used and provision to be madeTeaching strategies to be used and provision to be made Review informationReview information Success or exit criteriaSuccess or exit criteria

16 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE The role of the Teaching Assistant To promote the Health and Safety of themselves and othersTo promote the Health and Safety of themselves and others To promote the well-being of themselves and othersTo promote the well-being of themselves and others To support pupils and carry out duties as detailed in job descriptionsTo support pupils and carry out duties as detailed in job descriptions

17 Aspects of Good Teaching Assistant Practice Fosters the participation of pupils in the social and academic processes of a schoolFosters the participation of pupils in the social and academic processes of a school Seeks to enable pupils to become more independent learnersSeeks to enable pupils to become more independent learners Help to raise standards of achievement for all pupilsHelp to raise standards of achievement for all pupils

18 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Health and Safety School staff have a duty of care to each other and to the children. They need to know the school’s: policiespolicies emergency proceduresemergency procedures accident and security proceduresaccident and security procedures areas of riskareas of risk

19 Child Protection

20 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Child Protection Staff have a duty of care to protect children from abuse: Abuse is when a child is hurt or harmed by another person in a way that causes significant harm to that child and which may well have an effect on the child's development or well beingAbuse is when a child is hurt or harmed by another person in a way that causes significant harm to that child and which may well have an effect on the child's development or well being

21 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE The duty to refer Through their day-to-day contact with pupils, and direct work with families, education staff have a crucial role to play in noticing indicators of possible abuse or neglect, and in referring concerns to the designated senior teacher in their school. Working Together to Safeguard Children, DoH/DfEE/Home Office (1999)

22 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Child Protection Staff must ensure they: Are alert to the signs of abuseAre alert to the signs of abuse Know who their Child Protection Officer isKnow who their Child Protection Officer is Follow the procedures detailed in the CP Policy to the letterFollow the procedures detailed in the CP Policy to the letter Also protect themselvesAlso protect themselves

23 E DUCATION D IRECTORATE CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE Types of abuse PhysicalPhysical EmotionalEmotional SexualSexual NeglectNeglect

24 Definitions of Abuse (Children Act 1989) Physical Injury Actual or likely injury to a child, or failure to prevent physical injury (or suffering) to a child, including deliberate poisoning, suffocation and Munchausen's Syndrome by proxy

25 Sexual Abuse Actual or likely sexual exploitation of a child or adolescent. The child may be dependent and/or developmentally immature

26 Neglect The persistent or severe neglect of a child or the failure to protect a child from exposure to any kind of danger, including cold and starvation or extreme failure to carry out important aspects of care, resulting in the significant impairment of the child's health or development

27 Emotional Abuse Actual or likely severe adverse effect on the emotional and behavioural development of a child caused by persistent or severe emotional ill-treatment or rejection. All abuse involves some emotional ill-treatment.

28 How to respond to a child wanting to talk about abuse Show acceptance of what the child says (however unlikely the story may sound)Show acceptance of what the child says (however unlikely the story may sound) Keep calmKeep calm Look at the child directlyLook at the child directly Be honestBe honest Tell the child you will need to let someone else know – don't promise confidentialityTell the child you will need to let someone else know – don't promise confidentiality

29 How to respond to a child wanting to talk about abuse. Even when a child has broken a rule, they are not to blame for the abuseEven when a child has broken a rule, they are not to blame for the abuse Be aware that the child may have been threatened or bribed not to tellBe aware that the child may have been threatened or bribed not to tell Never push for informationNever push for information

30 Helpful things you may say or show I believe you ( or showing acceptance of what the child says) Thank you for letting me know It's not your fault I will help you

31 Don't say... Why didn't you tell anyone before? I can't believe it Are you sure this is true? Why? How? When? Who? Where? Never make false promises Never make statements such as 'I am shocked, don't tell anyone else'

32 Dealing with Disclosure ReceiveReceive ReassureReassure ReactReact RecordRecord RememberRemember RelaxRelax

33 Receive Listen without shock or disbeliefListen without shock or disbelief Accept what is being saidAccept what is being said Make notes as soon as possible afterwardsMake notes as soon as possible afterwards

34 Reassure Don’t make promises you may not be able to keepDon’t make promises you may not be able to keep Don’t promise confidentialityDon’t promise confidentiality Do reassure and alleviate guiltDo reassure and alleviate guilt

35 React Don’t interrogateDon’t interrogate Do not ask ‘leading questions’Do not ask ‘leading questions’ Do not use open questions – ‘And?’Do not use open questions – ‘And?’ Don’t criticise the perpetratorDon’t criticise the perpetrator Don’t ask child to repeat it to another member of staffDon’t ask child to repeat it to another member of staff Explain what you have to do next and support the child with interviews with social services etc.Explain what you have to do next and support the child with interviews with social services etc.

36 Record Make brief notes at the time then write them up as soon as possibleMake brief notes at the time then write them up as soon as possible Don’t destroy originalsDon’t destroy originals Record date time place any non-verbal behaviour and the words used by the childRecord date time place any non-verbal behaviour and the words used by the child Draw diagram to indicate bruisingDraw diagram to indicate bruising Record statements rather than interpretations or assumptionsRecord statements rather than interpretations or assumptions

37 Remember To follow your establishment’s guidelines.To follow your establishment’s guidelines. Consult as appropriate, refer on to social services if relevant.Consult as appropriate, refer on to social services if relevant.

38 Relax Try to !Try to ! Get someone to support you if you need itGet someone to support you if you need it

39 Code of Conduct Is intended to help staff minimise the risks of being accused of improper conductIs intended to help staff minimise the risks of being accused of improper conduct Offers practical advice to be incorporated into school policy and strategyOffers practical advice to be incorporated into school policy and strategy Identifies areas of potential risk and offers practical suggestionsIdentifies areas of potential risk and offers practical suggestions


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