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22. Calochortus greenei S. Watson, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 14: 264. 1879. Greene’s mariposa-lily Stems usually branching, 1–3 dm. Leaves: basal persistent,

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Presentation on theme: "22. Calochortus greenei S. Watson, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 14: 264. 1879. Greene’s mariposa-lily Stems usually branching, 1–3 dm. Leaves: basal persistent,"— Presentation transcript:

1 22. Calochortus greenei S. Watson, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 14: Greene’s mariposa-lily Stems usually branching, 1–3 dm. Leaves: basal persistent, ca. 2 dm; blade glabrous adaxially. Inflorescences 1–5-flowered. Flowers erect; perianth open, campanulate; sepals 25–30 mm; petals purplish, with darker purple abaxial crescent distal to gland, 30–40 mm, not ciliate at base, ± hairy; glands deeply depressed, bordered proximally by wide ciliate membrane, distally by short hairs. Capsules erect, 3-winged, ellipsoid, 20–25 mm. Seeds irregular. Flowering mid summer. Shrubby hillsides, open woodlands, dry soils and slopes; of conservation concern; m; Calif., Oreg. Peggy Fiedler was the author of the FNA treatment of Calochortus for Volume 26. Flora of North America— authoritative information on names, descriptions, distributions, habitats, and taxonomic problems. WHAT are we doing? We are making information on the plants of North America available in a series of books and online. Total series: 30 volumes Target completion:2012 Published to date: 15 volumes covering 141 families, 1412 genera, and 8778 species. Volumes 1—5, 8, 18—27 have been published. Included: All native and naturalized vascular plants and bryophytes in North America north of Mexico, including Greenland. Contents of published volumes, and completed manuscripts in future volumes, are available at and through efloras.org. Other online resources for North American plants link to FNA content. Examples are USDA PLANTS and Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. WHO is doing the work? Project team: botanists Authors, reviewers, editors work at home institutions. Lead editorial centers located at Missouri Botanical Garden, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, University of Montreal, University of Kansas. Bibliographic center is at the Hunt Institute; nomenclatural center is at Harvard University. WHERE does the information come from? Authors review previous literature, examine specimens, draw on their own research and field knowledge. More than 70 regional reviewers check for local accuracy. PUBLISHED by Oxford University Press, U. S. Order from Use promo code for discount. Information on more than 1000 taxa of conservation concern provided to date. WHO uses Flora of North America? FNA is used as a reliable source for the correct name to use for a species, for comparative descriptions, and for general distributions. It is used especially by non- botanists and frequently is cited in papers on pollinators, invasive plants, biogeography, and conservation. FNA provides the most comprehensive information on non- native species in North America. FNA stimulates research and publication of findings. Many species that are rare and have been known about for a long time are finally published so they can be included in FNA. Publication of an FNA volume provides the context to evaluate and publish new distribution records. Since 2000 more than 350 new North American plant taxa have been described, many as a result of FNA work. NO other work or online reference provides names, literature, descriptions, and identification keys for these plants throughout their range in North America.


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