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“People do not want to be less informed. They want to be more informed with less information!” To move forward, backward or to a Contents page, move your.

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Presentation on theme: "“People do not want to be less informed. They want to be more informed with less information!” To move forward, backward or to a Contents page, move your."— Presentation transcript:

1 “People do not want to be less informed. They want to be more informed with less information!” To move forward, backward or to a Contents page, move your cursor over the arrows in the bottom left corner of each page and make a selection. You can also use your space bar (forward); or your PageUp/PageDn keys (backward/forward). Tips & Techniques for UNDERSTANDABLE Conversations (Verbal & Non-verbal Communications)

2 Orientation Non-verbal Communications Verbal Communications Table of Contents Click on any colored bullet found on the Content pages to jump to a specific section.

3 Orientation This material was developed to help you plan for successful face-to-face and telephone business conversations. As you work through the slides, you will explore three tools that you use all the time – words, voice & tone, body language – and you will identify best practices for each tool. Authentic Communication Congruent Delivery Return to main Table of Contents

4 Authentic Communication Do you find some people easier to trust than others? Do you ever wonder how you can create trust when you communicate with others? By using clear, assertive, open and supportive communication, you can create the high trust culture that is so essential to productive interactions with others. On the other hand, communication that is defensive, political and self- serving leads to an unproductive conversation. When people have low levels of trust and high levels of defensiveness, creative problem solving becomes almost impossible. Orientation

5 Congruent Delivery People judge your believability not only by what you say, but on the manner and tone of your communication. To gain trust, your words, voice and tone, and body language must all be aligned. Orientation  Words  Voice & Tone  Body Language 100% 7% 38% 55% Words Voice & Tone Body Language Dr. Albert Mehrabian. University of California. Silent Messages. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publications, 1981, pp

6 Verbal Communications In this section, you will look at how you can meet your listener’s needs by understanding the effects words and voice & tone have when you speak. You will gain best practices that you can apply to your business conversations. Return to main Table of Contents Choosing & Using High Impact Words Putting Your Voice to Work

7 Choosing & Using High Impact Words 1.Use picture words and active verbs 2.Use transitions and labels (to help them stay with you) 3.Use the “human” voice (I, we, you) Below, you will find three techniques that will help you speak in a style that is easy for your listener to listen to and to understand. Let’s explore each of these techniques in more depth. Verbal Communications

8 1. Use picture words and active verbs By using strong nouns, you create mental images in the mind of your listener. Nouns such as project, molecule and wavelength are all examples of strong nouns. By using strong nouns, you will automatically use more active (rather than passive) verbs to get your point across. Here’s an example: Don’t say… The observed rate of emission of radiation from hot bodies was explained very well by the quantum hypothesis. Rather say… We used the quantum hypothesis to best explain the observed rate of emission of radiation from hot bodies. abstract nounpassive verb picture nounactive verb Verbal Communications

9 2. Use transitions and label statements Help your listener stay with you by using a transition statement to tell them what you are going to talk about next. A transition statement serves as a “verbal signpost” that lets your listener know that you are about to move to a new package of information. Each time you move to a new topic, begin with a transition statement; then use a label statement to tell your listener your main point. Here’s an example: (Transition) Now that I have given you an overview of the choices, I would like your opinion. (Label) What do you think is the best path? Verbal Communications

10 3. Use the “human” voice You can stay connected with your listener by using the “human” voice. Use the pronouns I, we, and you rather that the impersonal (passive) voice exclusively. The you voice is particularly effective when your objective is either to influence or to mobilize your listener. Here’s an example: Don’t say… The successful operation of the system will be dependant on completion of a three day training program. Rather say… We would encourage you to attend our three-day training program. Then, you will be able to operate the system effectively. Verbal Communications

11 Putting Your Voice to Work 1.Speak loudly enough 2.Avoid “drop-off” syndrome 3.Vary pitch and pace of voice 4.Avoid filler words 5.Enunciate clearly Good speakers enhance their conversation skills by speaking loudly and enunciating clearly. They also add interest by varying the pitch and pace of their voice. Let’s explore these voice & tone techniques. Verbal Communications

12 1. Speak loudly enough Do you speak loudly enough? Background noise, poor acoustics, even being seated, can get in the way. You must speak at a volume that can easily be heard by the person you are talking to. Good speakers achieve loudness through a combination of volume and projection. Loudness = Volume + Projection 2. Avoid drop-off syndrome Do you speak loudly and clearly but allow the volume to drop off as you complete each sentence or group of sentences? Avoid drop-off syndrome. Be sure to maintain enough volume throughout your conversation. Verbal Communications

13 3. Vary pitch and pace of voice Variety is the spice of life. Do you vary the pitch and pace of your voice when you speak? By varying your pace, you can more easily hold your listener’s interest. For example, slow down when you are making an emphatic point. You can use inflection – like a highlighter or bold text – to help you highlight important points and show that you are interested in what you are saying. Verbal Communications

14 Listen to some of the top television or radio newscasters to hear how they emphasize certain words and use pauses for effect. Practice using these techniques. Record yourself applying similar techniques to your voice. Listen to the recording. Once you are pleased with the results, begin to apply these same techniques in your actual business conversations. Exercise Verbal Communications

15 4. Avoid filler words Do you use any unnecessary and annoying filler words when you speak? Become aware of words like um, er, okay, like, etc in your speech pattern and eliminate them. These words distract your listener. 5. Enunciate clearly Are you constantly being asked to repeat what you just said? Enunciation is likely the problem. Poor enunciation usually stems from sloppy speech patterns or from a strong regional accent. Most people can tidy up poor enunciation through coaching and audiotape feedback. Consider seeking some professional coaching from a speech specialist. Verbal Communications

16 Non-verbal Communications In this section, you will look at how you can meet your listener’s needs by understanding how your non-verbal communication effects your message. Return to main Table of Contents Non-verbal Ways to Communicate

17 Non-verbal Ways to Communicate Your listener will receive only 10% of their information from listening to you talk. They receive a more powerful message – possible subliminally – from your non-verbal language. How you make eye contact, move, stand or sit has a dramatic effect on how you are perceived. Let’s take a look at the main non-verbal tools you may use in your conversations. 1.Eye contact 2.Facial expression 3.Posture 4.Gestures 5.Movement Non-verbal Communications

18 1. Eye contact Good eye contact is a powerful way to connect with your listener. A useful rule is to focus on the listener for 2-3 seconds before looking away. 2. Facial expression Due to nerves, you may adopt a facial expression that is not consistent with the purpose of your message (e.g. frowning while delivering good news). Be aware of your facial expressions and match it to your message. 3. Posture When you have a sloppy posture, your listener sees a sloppy attitude. Stand up straight, relax your shoulders, plant your feet about shoulder width apart and unlock your knees. If you are sitting, don’t slouch or look too relaxed. Your listener may misread your body language and assume lack of interest on your part. Non-verbal Communications

19 4. Gestures Gestures are message-enhancing when used in moderation. If you choose to use gestures, use large gestures. Move your arms from your shoulders. 5. Movement Movement is good, if used sparingly. It helps you burn off excess energy and adds interest for your listener. They key to movement is moderation. Avoid temptations like pacing, if standing, and tapping your fingers, if sitting. Non-verbal Communications

20 Review Putting Your Voice to Work on Slide 11 and Non-verbal Ways to Communicate on Slide 17.Putting Your Voice to Work on Slide 11 Non-verbal Ways to Communicate on Slide 17 Exercise Verbal & Non-verbal Communications 1. List the techniques you are already applying on a regular bases. 2. List the techniques you need to improve on. Consider what you can do differently in your next conversation to make it more effective.

21 By applying the tips and techniques you have learned in this course, you will be well on your way to: Creating a higher level of trust with your listener. Improving you verbal and non-verbal skills. “People do not want to be less informed. They want to be more informed with less information!”


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