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Information Sessions Fall 2006 The Review of the Maine Learning Results.

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Presentation on theme: "Information Sessions Fall 2006 The Review of the Maine Learning Results."— Presentation transcript:

1 Information Sessions Fall 2006 The Review of the Maine Learning Results

2 Coordinated State Efforts MLR Review High School Reform Graduation Requirements Chancellor’s Committee on College Readiness Core Course of Study State Assessment/Accountability Literacy, Numeracy, and Technology

3 Great Standards are Not Sufficient But they are ESSENTIAL!

4 Essential but Not Sufficient Inside the Classroom Content Knowledge Understanding of Pedagogy and Learning Commitment to Engage Students in Learning Data to Guide and Support Learning Use of literacy, numeracy, and technology for learning Systemic Supports for the Classroom Coherent Curriculum Professional Learning Communities Use of data

5 Making Standards for Success

6 MLR Review Advisory Committee Guiding Values Rigor and relevance Preparation for 21 st Century Integration/connections Clarity, coherence and essentialness Grounding in research Two way accessibility in the review Engaged instruction Advancement of the current MLR

7 National Consultants National Consultants in each Content Area Edward Colozzi Sheila Byrd Marlene Tappe / Bonnie Mohnsen Ann Shannon Christine Brown James Rutherford Mary McFarland Wendy Cohen

8 Task of National Consultants Maine’s standards, story and goals Exemplar standards nationally and internationally Lean initial draft Work with content panels (All material made available on MLR review website.)

9 Work of the Panels Review initial drafts Work with national consultant Ground decisions in national standards and the body of knowledge on learning Incorporate online survey results and varied focus Groups – special education, ELL, business, external reviewers … Identify integration points

10 How Have the MLRs Changed Structure Content Clearer, more coherent and manageable More focused and essential

11 Feedback from the Online Survey Greater coherence and clarity PK – Diploma continuum of knowledge and skills

12 Are the Proposed Revised MLRs more Focused? Content Area# of Standards (1997) # of Perf. Indicators (1997) # of Stand. (2007) # of Perf. Ind. (2007) Career and Education Development English & Language Arts Health/ Phys. Ed. 6/ / /3 9 69/ Math *

13 Are the Proposed Revised MLRs more Focused? Content Area # of Standards (1997) # of Perf. Indicators (1997) # of Stand. (2007) # of Perf. Ind. (2007) World Languages Science & Tech Social Studies Visual & Perf. Arts 382*555*

14 Do the Proposed Revised MLRs Represent More Essential Content? External reviewers National Standards Chancellor’s Task Force on College Readiness International Center for Leadership in Education Business Community

15 Other Differences in the proposed 2007 MLR Mathematics and Reading Career and Education Development Social Studies Science and Technology Visual and Performing Arts HE and PE World Languages

16 1. Elements of Writing PK- 2 Students use a writing process to communicate their ideas. 3-5 Students use a writing process with an emphasis on the development of a central idea, for a variety of audiences and purposes.

17 1. Elements of Writing 6-8 Students use a writing process to communicate effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes. 9- Diploma Students use a writing process to develop an appropriate writing genre, exhibiting an explicit organizational structure, perspective and style to communicate with target audiences for specific purposes.

18 PK- 2 Students use a writing process to communicate their ideas. Select a focus for writing and develop an idea, including a beginning, middle and end. Respond to clarifying questions and suggested revisions. Edit for correct grammar, usage, and mechanics with assistance. Create legible final drafts.

19 9 – Diploma Students use a writing process to develop an appropriate writing genre, exhibiting an explicit organizational structure, perspective and style to communicate with target audiences for specific purposes. Locate, summarize and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources, as necessary. Apply aspects of various genres for rhetorical effect, strong diction and distinctive voice. Edit for correct grammar, usage and mechanics. Create legible final drafts.

20 Elements of Writing Students use a writing process to communicate their ideas. a.Select a focus for writing and develop an idea, including a beginning, middle and end. b.Respond to clarifying questions and suggested revisions. c.Edit for correct grammar, usage, and mechanics with assistance. d.Create legible final drafts. Students use a writing process with an emphasis on the development of a central idea, for a variety of audiences and purposes. a.Select a purpose for writing. b.Pre-write using graphic or other structures to organize their ideas. c.Establish an organizing structure and maintain a consistent focus. d.Include an introduction and conclusion. e.Write coherent paragraphs that have supporting sentences and a concluding sentence. f.Revise original drafts to improve coherence, provide better descriptive details, and to convey voice. g.Edit for correct grammar, usage and mechanics. h.Create legible final drafts. Students use a writing process to communicate effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes. a.Determine a purpose for writing. b.Decide which information to include to achieve the desired purpose. c.Revise drafts to improve focus and effect and voice, incorporating peer feedback. d.Edit for correct grammar, usage and mechanics. e.Create writing to achieve a specific purpose. (L) f.Create legible final drafts. Students use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre, exhibiting an explicit organizational structure, perspective and style to communicate with target audiences for specific purposes. a.Locate, summarize and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources, as necessary. b.Apply aspects of various genres for rhetorical effect, strong diction and distinctive voice. c.Edit for correct grammar, usage and mechanics. d.Create legible final drafts.

21 Essential Must Mean Career, College and Citizenship Ready for the 21 st Century. NO COLLEGE, NO FUTURE? Between 1973 and 1998, in skilled blue-collar, clerical, and related professions, “the percentage of workers who were high school dropouts fell by two- thirds, while the percentage of workers with some college or a college degree more than doubled”; in less-skilled blue-collar, service, and related professions, “the percentage of workers who were high school drop-outs fell by nearly half, while the percentage of workers with some college or a college degree tripled” (Carnevale, 2001)

22 Essential Must Mean Career, College and Citizenship Ready for the 21 st Century Job growth is concentrated in industries paying above-average wages, in industries requiring new skills and a more educated workforce, and in industries that disproportionately employ “knowledge workers.” Two particular areas of growth are managerial and professional specialty jobs. From 1983 to 1996, employment in occupations requiring an associate’s degree or post-secondary vocational training grew at a 3.1% annual rate compared to a 2.0% growth rate for all employment. (National Institute for Literacy (National Center for Family Literacy Page 11 Updated January 2003)

23 Essential Must Mean Career, College and Citizenship Ready for the 21 st Century, WHY? Three out of four companies report a shortage of qualified applicants for existing positions. In a recent survey, 95% of employers rated basic skills as important in hiring decisions. (National Institute for Literacy. (2000). Literacy skills for 21st century America: A blueprint for creating a more literate nation. Washington, DC: Author.)

24 Next Steps for the MLR Work: Lessons Learned Curriculum Coordinators Group (capacity building and professional development needs) Engaging Instruction Model and Case Studies (instructional considerations) Development of a Web-based MLR site (resource hub)

25 Timeline Adoption of MLR by Legislature 2007 – Publication of 2007 MLR Opportunity for schools to compare and adjust curriculum to 2007 MLR First POSSIBLE and first PROPOSED year for alignment to state-wide large scale assessment

26 What Can You Do Now? Public Hearing: October 23, 2006 Become familiar with the proposed MLR Use the crosswalks to identify curriculum overlaps between the 1997 and 2007 MLR and focus curriculum development/revision View Literacy, Numeracy, and Technology as Tools for Student/MLR Success

27 Thank you. Anita Bernhardt Maine Department of Education


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