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Optimising future opportunities for your child Erica McWilliam Montessori International College, Sippy Downs, 20 June, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Optimising future opportunities for your child Erica McWilliam Montessori International College, Sippy Downs, 20 June, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Optimising future opportunities for your child Erica McWilliam Montessori International College, Sippy Downs, 20 June, 2013

2 Education: more important than ever Education: more important than ever Better lifestyle Better health Less likely to be unemployed Bigger pay-packet More chance of re-engagement More community infrastructure

3 Education: less relevant than ever Credentials are ‘tick box’ items Global marketplace means new competitors Creative capital is worth more Learning best done through ‘peer-to-peer’ networks We are more ignorant than ever Unpredictable futures mean that traditional templates are not as valuable

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11 Data Transformation: the 4 Vs Data Transformation: the 4 Vs VolumeVarietyVelocityVeracity

12 Jodie, 19 years Born in 1994, same year as the internet 1996: Hotmail 1998: Google 1999: Napster 2000: DVD mass market in Aust 2001: iPod and xBox, 2007: iPhone and Playstation3 and Tumblr 2008: Facebook, Twitter and iPad 2010: Youtube is primary source of info – Jodie has never watched the news on free to air TV - the world looks like Youtube to Jodie. 2012: Snapchat

13 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter They will need to be much smarter too

14 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter Technology getting cheaper They will need to be much smarter too Too much ‘stuff’ – storage and disposal a big problem

15 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter Technology getting cheaper They will have more chances to be creative and connected They will need to be much smarter too Too much ‘stuff’ – storage and disposal a big problem A global job market means very high level of competence and competition

16 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter Technology getting cheaper They will have more chances to be creative and connected Many diseases are being eradicated by modern science – means longer, healthier life They will need to be much smarter too Too much ‘stuff’ – storage and disposal a big problem A global job market means very high level of competence and competition New ‘superbugs’ mean new diseases and poverty likely to get worse

17 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter Technology getting cheaper They will have more chances to be creative and connected Many diseases are being eradicated by modern science – means longer, healthier life Passion, kindness and ethical behaviour still matter They will need to be much smarter too Too much ‘stuff’ – storage and disposal a big problem A global job market means very high level of competence and competition New ‘superbugs’ mean new diseases and poverty likely to get worse In the era of Big Data, most information is untrustworthy – they need to be both keen and sceptical

18 Good NewsBad News Technology is getting smarter Technology is getting cheaper and more global They will have more chances to be creative and connected Many diseases are being eradicated by modern science – means they will live longer, healthier lives Passion, kindness and ethical behaviour still matter Valuing their own abilities and capacity to learn is vital They will also need to be smarter Too much ‘stuff’ – storage and disposal a big problem A global job market means very high level of competence and competition New ‘superbugs’ mean new diseases and poverty likely to get worse In the era of Big Data, most information is untrustworthy – they need to be both keen and sceptical Being too self-focused can make them more vulnerable when setbacks occur

19 Global Labour Markets High end personal services High end impersonal services Low end personal services Low end impersonal services

20 Global Labour Markets High end personal services High end impersonal services Low end personal services Low end impersonal services

21 Global Labour Markets High end personal services High end impersonal services Low end personal services Low end impersonal services

22 Global Labour Markets High end personal services High end impersonal services Low end personal services Low end impersonal services

23 Global Labour Markets High end personal services High end impersonal services Low end personal services Low end impersonal services

24 Work Futures “Only a certain kind of individual can prosper in unstable fragmentary social conditions.” ( Richard Sennett ) “People who need managing are no longer employable.” ( Lee Crockett ) “Low level routine transactions are no longer required.”( Daniel Pink ) “The most valuable workers are creative thinkers whose ideas can be turned into valuable products and services.” ( Richard Florida )

25 design accumulation seriousness logic focus argument function symphony play meaning empathy story High Concept/High Touch

26 Getting serious about Play “Play will be to the 21 st century what work was to 300 years of industrial society – our dominant way of knowing, doing and creating value.” (Pat Kane, The Play Ethic)

27 Teaching in ‘Truth Mode’ Knowledge is an accumulation of known facts and concepts Facts are best organised through disciplines Instruction is the most promising strategy Memory and imitation are useful Answers are right or wrong Test results measure success Best evidence of learning = exam results

28 Teaching in ‘Design Mode’ What is this idea good for? What does it do and fail to do? Does it have a future? How could it be improved? What is the value-add?

29 The challenge Performance culture Content-driven Test-oriented Packaged in advance Pencil and paper Imitative routines Credential is the prize Discipline-focused Learning culture Learning culture Capacity building Personalised Self-managed Focus is on the journey Virtual and ‘real’ have equal status Open-ended Creative

30 Knowledge Work Mandated Knowledge data ‘at rest’ certain agreed evidence-base strong largely individual social context irrelevant correct answers Dynamic Knowledge data ‘in motion’ tentative often contested evidence-base is weak mainly collaborative social context is relevant better questions

31 Self-Managing Learners Self-critical diagnosticians – not needy of constant affirmation Keen and sceptical users of data, not passive consumers of information Pay 50/50 attention to learning and performing “Know what to do when they don’t know what to do” Take risks and try new things, mix and match, assemble, edit See obstacles are challenges Work well in team situations

32 Self-managers with creative learning portfolios will be better prepared for the future than those who rely solely on formal educational credentials.

33 Website:


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