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Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Transition Services and the IEP Township High School.

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Presentation on theme: "Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Transition Services and the IEP Township High School."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Presented by: Dr. Judy Hackett NSSEO Superintendent Transition Services and the IEP Township High School District #214 Parent Workshop

2 Workshop Agenda I. Introductions/Parent expectations for workshop II. Describe the importance of transition planning III. Review the changes in IDEA and state focus on transition planning and services IV. Review transition services and supports available for students/families V. Review the importance of transition planning for your child’s future

3 Special Thanks for Contributions to this powerpoint… Lisa Murphy, Asst. Principal, NSSEO Miner program Sally Wallace, NSSEO Transition specialist Greg Hill, NSSEO Transition specialist/Administrator MaryBeth DeFauw, NSSED Transition coordinator Ken Kozin, #214 Coordinator of Transition services Sue Walter, ISBE Transition coordinator I

4 History of Transition… Mid-1980’s, U.S. Dept. of Education realized that first group of students who had received special education programming, as authorized under PL were leaving school and not being successful in adult life Post-school outcome research indicates that the special education curriculum, instruction, and planning were not meeting students' needs Limited levels of service coordination and collaboration among schools and community service agencies created difficulties for students with disabilities in achieving positive post-school results. Not enough time, attention and data collection has been dedicated to transition and post-secondary outcomes for students w/ disabilities.

5 History of Drop-out rates Almost 1/3 of all youth with disabilities who exit the school system do so by dropping out. Youth with emotional disabilities have the highest drop out rates (from 21% to 64% - twice the rate of nondisabled students). The drop out rate for students with learning disabilities is 32% National Center for Education Statistics, 2001

6 More concerning statistics… 57% employment rate for yr. olds w/ disabilities, compared to 72% non-disabled peers 50% rate of competitive employment 3-5 years after graduation for graduates with disabilities, compared to 69% of their non-disabled peers 35% employment rate of individuals with disabilities who report having a FT or PT job vs. 78% of non-disabled peers. Transition methods for Youth with Disabilities by Test, Aspen and Everson, 2006

7 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004 Transition Changes

8 Rationale and highlights of IDEA changes Prompting new requirements on transition planning and implementation based on history/intensified study  More clearly and expanded definition of transition services – focus on results  Clear starting point (14.5 yrs.*)  Articulate goals and state of transition services  Summary of Performance documenting student’s academic/functional achievements  Increased collaboration and individualized approach to transition planning – enhanced post-school outcomes for students

9 Eligibility Termination and the Summary Of Performance (SOP) School district must provide the child with a summary of the child’s academic achievement and functional performance, and recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting his/her postsecondary goals. – Graduation with a regular diploma – Exceeding the maximum age of eligibility 34CFR § (e)(3)

10 Summary of Academic Achievement Summary of Functional Performance as it Relates to Post-Secondary Goals Recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the student’s measurable post-secondary goals Summary of Performance Federal Mandate (IDEA)

11 *Establish a student’s eligibility for reasonable accommodations and supports *Assist in the DVR assessment process *Provides summative documentation *Completed during the last year of high school – (not necessarily a part of the student IEP) *Is driven and individualized by the student’s post-secondary measurable goals *Does NOT require additional assessment *CANNOT take the place of the exit IEP meeting Summary of Performance

12 Age of Majority "Beginning not later than one year before the student reaches the age of majority (18 years old), the IEP must document that the student and family have been informed that parental rights under IDEA will transfer to the student."

13 Age of Majority (continued) The rights that will transfer from the parent to the student include: Notification of meetings Notification and consent for evaluation Selection of participants of IEP meetings Approval of the contents of the IEP Approval regarding change of placement (including graduation) In other words, the student, upon reaching the age of majority, will be responsible for making decisions about the IEP. For those students who may be deemed legally incompetent to make important life decisions, schools should provide parents with necessary information to begin guardianship proceedings with local court systems.

14 Transition Planning in Illinois Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 14 ½, and updated annually thereafter, the IEP shall include: Appropriate, measurable post-secondary goals based upon age- appropriate assessments related to education, training, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills Transition services that are needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, including courses of study and any other needed services to be provided by entities other than the school district 23 IAC (c)

15 Illinois Special Education Rules Graduation or Completion of Program Student’s who require continued public school education experiences to successfully move on to their post-school goals are eligible for such services through the day before the his/her 22 nd birthday. Student’s who graduate with a regular high school diploma are not longer eligible for FAPE. Students can still participate in the graduation ceremony –Regular diploma is “held” by the school district during provision of transition services as appropriate –Student remains eligible to receive FAPE 23 IAC (c)

16 Transition as it relates to IDEA legislation

17 State Performance Plan Requirements Emphasis on Data Collection to improve post-secondary outcomes for students

18 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part State ’ s required plan to meet performance standards on 20 indicators related to IDEA reauthorization The following four are specific to secondary transition Indicator: Indicator 1. % of youth who Graduate Indicator 2. % of youth who Drop out Indicator 13. % of youth who Have transition components in the IEP Indicator 14. % of youth who Achieve post-school outcomes

19 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part B Indicator 13 Percent of youth age 16 and older with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet post- secondary goals  Illinois IDEA regulation is age 14 ½ (Federal IDEA is 16) – emphasizing the importance of focus and collecting data, information that inform staff and families

20 1. There is a measurable post-secondary goal stated for each of the following post-secondary goal areas: a. Employment (required) b. Education AND/OR Training (required) c. Independent Living (if applicable) 2. There is at least one IEP goal listed for each applicable post-secondary goal area. 3. There is at least one transition service listed for each post-secondary goal area. 4. There is evidence of coordination between the LEA and other post-secondary services for each post-secondary goal area. 5. There is evidence that age-appropriate transition assessments were used for each post-secondary goal area. 6. A course of study is indicated which is aligned to all of the student’s post-secondary goal areas. To Meet the Requirements of Indicator 13…

21 Critical Connectedness of Transition Process Quality IEP’s and focus on transition as a core component Staying in school and participating in meaningful experiences Positive post-school outcomes – education, work and living skills Graduating from High School

22 Transition Tree of Influence 14 Percent of youth with IEPs who, within one year after graduation, have been competitively employed, enrolled in postsecondary school, or both. 1. Percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular diploma. 2. Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school. 13. Percent of youth aged 14 ½ or above with an IEP with adequate goals and transition services Federal and State Transition Requirements Person-Centered Transition Planning Supporting Student Self-Determination Transition: Centerpiece of the IEP Implementation of Secondary Transition Best Practices Interagency Collaboration and Transition Adult Life Outcomes for Students with Disabilities: A World of Opportunity SSI and Transition Planning Health and Medical Issues in Transition Planning TOTAL TRANSITION MODULES Sue Walter, 1/07, ISBE Transition

23 Transition Planning Dynamic process – changes/additions over time Partnerships w/ student, parents, community agencies, shared roles Maximizing employment, integration, and community participation for young adults with disabilities

24 Beginning as early as possible works best…knowing that it will continue to change… Recommendations from the field –Discuss Career Options, Gr 7 – 9 –Postsecondary Options, Gr 8 – 10 –Student Choice, Gr 8 – 10 –Academic Planning, Gr 8 – 9 –Personal, Social Planning and Preparation, Gr 8 – 12 Webb, K.W. (2000). Transition to postsecondary education: strategies for students with disabilities. TX: PRO-ED Series on Transit8ion. Transition is a process.. not an event

25 What is a Measurable Post-School Goal? A Measurable Post-School Goal – –Is the result of high school…what the student will achieve after leaving high school –Is based on the student’s strengths, preferences and interests –Is based on age-appropriate transition assessments Sue Walter, 2008

26 “Coordinated activities" listed in IDEA include: instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post- school adult living objectives, and, when appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational assessment.

27

28 Courses of Study The intent is to make sure the courses in which the student enrolls help him or her develop the knowledge and skills he or she will need to achieve the targeted post- school outcomes. In helping the student plan a course of study, IEP teams should consider all of the school's courses and programs that currently exist and in which the student might enroll.

29 Course of Study (continued) based upon identified post-school outcomes consider all courses offered by the school include many courses, not only special education courses planning provides a good opportunity to work with the guidance counselor not set in stone. As the student's identified post-school goals change, so may the courses he or she will take. This is especially true for younger students whose vision for the future may change drastically before they enter high school.

30 Writing Measurable Post School Transition Outcomes IEP Goals Transition Outcomes IEP goals are meant to be met/measured during the school year. IEP goals are deficit driven. IEP goals are measured by performance. Example: Joe will increase his reading comprehension from 5.4 GE to 6.8 GE through the A+ program by May of 2008  Transition goals are related to life after high school.  Transition goals are measured by whether the goal occurs or does not occur.  Example: Joe will attend community college. (either he enrolls or he does not.

31 Writing Measurable Post School Transition Goals “ SET IN SAND” Become More Defined Over Time Level of Detail Changes Over Time Student Interests and Needs Change Over Time

32 Writing Measurable Post School Transition Outcomes  Goals for AFTER High School  Employment  Education/Training  Adult Living (optional, but important!)

33 Writing Measurable Post School Transition Outcomes  Interests, Preferences, Strengths, and Abilities  Limitations  Based on Data Collection  Data Allows for Realistic Goal Setting

34 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes Education Training Goal for a College-Bound Student At 14 ½: Jill will attend college. Senior Year: Jill will attend community college for two years and then transfer to a 4 year university. She will major in recreation therapy.

35 Education/Training Goal for Student with Cognitive Disabilities At 14 ½: Bill will receive on the job training for a competitive job. He will be enrolled in classes at the community college to promote skills. At Graduation: Bill will receive job coaching through supported services of DRS. He will attend community college and be enrolled in photography classes. He will also enroll in classes through the park district. Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes

36 Education/Training Goal for Students with Severe Disabilities At 14 ½: Mandy will receive functional living skills instruction. At Graduation: Mandy will receive life skills instruction through cooperative efforts of family and a local adult developmental training center. She will also access NWSRA for community skill training and leisure and recreation activities.

37 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes Employment Goal for a Student with Cognitive Disabilities At 14 ½: Max will be employed in a competitive job with support services as needed. At Graduation: Max will be employed in a corporate office mail room. He will receive support services as needed through DRS. He will utilize natural supports in the workplace as determined through support services and corporate human services.

38 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes Employment Goal for a Student with Severe Disabilities At 14 ½: Jason will contribute to the community in a volunteer position. At Graduation: Jason will volunteer 5 hours each week at the community church. He will help assemble Sunday bulletins with the assistance of other church volunteers. (natural supports) He will attend an adult training program on a part-time basis.

39 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes Adult Living Goal for a College Bound Student At 14 ½: Jack will live independently. At Graduation: Jack will live in a dorm/apartment during college. He will live independently in an apartment/house following college graduation.

40 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes Adult Living Goal for a Student with Cognitive Disabilities At 14 ½: Stephanie will live independently with support. At Graduation: Stephanie will live in a apartment with a friend. She will receive intermittent support for budgeting and scheduling recreation/leisure activities through Resources for Community Living.

41 Examples of Post School Transition Outcomes At 14 ½: Sandy will live with parents. At Graduation: Sandy will live in a group home with ongoing 24/7 supported services. Adult Living Goal for a Student with a Severe Disability

42 Writing Measurable Post School Transition Outcomes Once Goals are Written Determine…  Current Levels of Academic Performance  Current Levels of Functional Performance  How do these levels relate to the Post School Goals?

43 Transition Assessments Transition assessment should be considered as a process of collecting information that is directly relevant to the post- secondary goals for each individual student. This does not mean a single test or even a series of assessments over a short period of time. Age appropriate transition assessments must be systematic and planned and occur over the course of the student's school career.

44 Transition Assessment is an “ongoing process of collecting data on individual’s needs, preferences and interests as they relate to the demands of current and future working, educational, living, and personal and social environments.” Transition Assessments serve as the common thread in the transition process and form the basis for defining goals and services in the IEP/Transition Planning process. Division of Career Development and Transition, CEC

45 The overall purposes of transition assessment are to: Identify students' interests and preferences Determine post-school goals and options Develop relevant learning experiences (instruction) and transition service needs Identify supports (linkages) needed to accomplish goals Evaluate instruction and supports. (Noonan, Morningstar, & Clark, 2005)

46 Two critical elements of transition assessment include self-determination and person-centered planning. Self-determined assessment should lead to greater self-awareness of student preferences, interests, and needs during transition. Person-centered planning offers a strategy for implementing an assessment process that focuses on the contributions and vision for the future with the input and involvement of those closest to the student.

47 Four Basic Transition Skills Relevant To Students with Disabilities : Ability to assess their own skills and abilities; Awareness of the accommodations they need because of their disability; Knowledge of their civil rights through legislation such as IDEA, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act; Self-advocacy skills necessary to express their needs in the workplace, in educational institutions, and in community settings (Wandry & Repetto, 1993)

48 1. What are the student’s future outcomes/goals? 2. What skills does the student possess? 3. What skills must student acquire to achieve their goals? 4. What planning issues are needed to enhance opportunities to experience success? Transition Questions that guide Assessment…

49 Guiding Questions Do we understand this student's preferences and interests? In what ways can the school prepare students for the future? Is the student making progress toward specific instructional goals? What do we already know about this student that would be helpful in identifying post-school outcomes? What information do we need to know about this individual to determine post-school goals? What methods/sources will provide this information? How will the assessment data be collected and used in the IEP process?

50 Two critical elements of transition assessment include self-determination and person-centered planning. Self-determined assessment should lead to greater self-awareness of student preferences, interests, and needs during transition. Person-centered planning offers a strategy for implementing an assessment process that focuses on the contributions and vision for the future with the input and involvement of those closest to the student.

51 Four Basic Transition Skills Relevant to Students with Disabilities : Ability to assess their own skills and abilities; Awareness of the accommodations they need because of their disability; Knowledge of their civil rights through legislation such as IDEA, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act; Self-advocacy skills necessary to express their needs in the workplace, in educational institutions, and in community settings (Wandry & Repetto, 1993)

52 Categories of Transition Activities and Services These activities will be linked to the post school goals. These activities, with ongoing assessments, will help to define and refine the post school goals. At least one activity should reflect each post school goal.

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54 Instruction Formal activities and services designed to teach a skill or set of skills.  May range in nature from assisting a student to attain higher scores on a college entrance exam to improving daily living skills in preparation for living in a supported apartment.  Tutoring, general education classes, career/technical education classes, job coaching, self determination, etc.

55 Related Services Supportive and Therapeutic activities and services during and after high school to achieve and maintain post school goals.  Transportation, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation counseling, Parent counseling and training, orientation and mobility training, and speech therapy.  The transition plan will address these services as needed outside of the school environment.  Connection to agencies to ensure continuation of needed supports throughout adult life.

56 Post School Adult Living Activities Foster skills needed to function at a high level of independence  Skills that eliminate the need to rely on others; not necessarily used on a daily basis. These activities are usually done occasionally.  Include registering to vote, filing insurance claims, obtaining medical care, buying furniture, renting an apartment, buying a house, etc.  Consumer education classes?

57 Community Experiences Provide students the opportunity to practice skills in actual settings where they will be used.  May be incorporated into a student’s curricular experiences or conducted by adult agencies training programs during or after school hours.  May include vocational education, shopping, transportation, banking, recreation, and leisure activities.

58 Employment Activities that prepare a student for a future career.  Activities that include career awareness, career exploration, career preparation, and career assimilation.  Includes enrollment in Career/Technical Education classes.  Integration of academic and vocational/functional curriculums.

59 Daily Living Skills Involve activities that are required for day-to-day functioning within the home and community.  Activities done routinely by self-sufficient adults.  Cleaning, bill paying, personal hygiene, home maintenance, cooking, shopping for groceries, etc.  May also include activities that would encourage increased independence (assisting in physical care, self-feeding, food preparation assistance).

60 Functional Vocational Evaluation Assessment of student’s interests, aptitudes, and vocational skills that can help determine appropriate vocational training and educational placements.  Observation in real vocational settings  Real and simulated work environments

61 Timelines for Activities and Services  Consider time span needed for completion  Consider whether the activity or service is a one time event or is to be spread out over several months.  Indicate the date the activity or service will be accomplished.

62 Parent Workshop Summary Transition planning is a very important culminating process for secondary students. State and federal IDEA changes emphasize the importance of transition planning with increased expectations. Transition is an ongoing process through the secondary years, as student interests and needs evolve. The collaborative partnership between students, families, school systems and community agencies is essential for successful transition for students.

63 Resources for Parents District Transition Resource Directory District #214 Checklists – Transition and Career Services Transition from School to Work and Adult Life District Career Night, Career Trek Ken Kozin/#214 Transition staff Secondary Transitional Experience Program (STEP) NSSEO- Greg Hill


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