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Business Analysis events 25 th May & 19 th June 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Business Analysis events 25 th May & 19 th June 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Business Analysis events 25 th May & 19 th June 2006

2 Paul Turner

3 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs

4 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs Qualifications – the Supply side Employees and Training Providers

5 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs Qualifications – the Supply side Employees and Training Providers

6 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs Qualifications – the Supply side Employees and Training Providers Standard definitions and approaches Employers, Jobs, Employees and Training Providers

7 Debbie Paul Assist Knowledge Development Joint editor of Business Analysis

8 Our aim:  Best practice techniques  Pragmatic advice  Additional references To support professionalism in Business Analysis by providing:

9 IT Improvement Process Improvement Business Improvement Scope Maturity The development of Business Analysis

10 Competencies of a Business Analyst Business knowledge Behavioural skills and Personal qualities Techniques Range of competencies

11 Key techniques IT Improvement Process Improvement Business Improvement Strategy Analysis Systems Thinking Value chain Analysis Process Modelling Requirements Engineering Systems Modelling

12 Business Case COMPETENCIES Implementing Change Managing the Information Resource IT Improvement Process Improvement Business Improvement Enabling business change

13 Business Analysis - a key discipline  Defined standards  Greater scope and authority  Increasing professionalism

14 Debbie Paul Assist Knowledge Development Joint editor of Business Analysis

15 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs

16 Business change management Business analysis 3456 Programme management 67 Project management 4567 Business process testing 456 Change implementation management 56 Organisation design and implementation 56 Benefits management 56 Relationship management Stakeholder relationship management 56 SFIAplus V3.0 - snapshot

17 Business Analyst Role: SkillLevelWeighting Consultancy6High Technical Specialism5Low Business Process Improvement5High Change Implementation, Planning & Management6Medium Methods and Tools5Medium Organisation Design & Implementation3Medium Stakeholder Relationship Management5High Compliance Audit3High Business Analysis5High Data Analysis4Medium Business Process Testing4High Benefits Management5Medium

18 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs Qualifications – the Supply side Employees and Training Providers Standard definitions and approaches Employers, Jobs, Employees and Training Providers

19 Re-inventing Business Analysis: New skills? Craig Rollason

20 Industry Context “The IT profession needs to move from its traditional role of technical solution supplier to become a proactive business transformation partner. “ Colin Thompson, BCS deputy chief executive and programme director for the BCS professionalism in IT programme. April 2006 (1) Outsourcing (2) IT Projects on their own not enough

21 Re-cap of BA Role Definition “An internal consultancy role that has the responsibility for investigating business systems, identifying options for improving business systems and bridging the needs of the business with the use of IT.” From Business Analysis (2006), published by BCS. BusinessBASuppliers Skills to be business transformation partner?

22 Project Design Assess characteristics & decide approach and resources needed to deliver business outcomes Doing the right things  Strategic Fit Business Strategy Technical (IS/IT) Strategy Meets Investment Criteria (Business Case)/priority Doing things right  Selection of appropriate analysis approach & tools  Right Resource Capabilities You, Business Colleagues  Deciding the sourcing strategy & commercials

23 Change Management IT CHANGE OUTCOMES & BENEFITS Past & current IT CHANGE BUSINESS CHANGE OUTCOMES & BENEFITS Current? & future

24 Understanding Business Change 1. Culture 2. Desire 3. Capability 4. Process 5. Tools Five Change Levels New IT System New CEO Six Sigma Recruit Graduates

25 Emotional Intelligence (EI) EI: Set of skills, including self-motivation, empathy and social competence in interpersonal relationships e.g.  Self Awareness  Political Awareness  Influence As opposed to Mental Intelligence: Capacity to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas and language, and learn. Measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ)reasonplansolve problems abstractlylanguagelearn

26 EI & IQ working together LowHigh Emotional Intelligence Hearts Minds Hearts & Minds Logically right. Good strategy “Traditional position for IT projects” Formula for transformation Inspired. “people are Joined up” Mental Intelligence

27 Challenges BA’s will face Role clarity “What sort of BA?” Salary aligned to responsibilities Re-assess education & skills Overcoming IT stereotypes

28 Summary BA skills need to develop as a result of:  Outsourcing  Desire for ever greater IT/Business Alignment BA needs to develop core skills:  Emotional Intelligence  Project Design  Change Management

29 Thank You Re-inventing Business Analysis Craig Rollason

30 Agile Business Analysis Dot Tudor TCC Training and Consultancy ISEB Business Analysis, PRINCE2, DSDM,

31 What is Agile? In the late 1990's several methodologies emphasized: close collaboration between developers and business experts; face-to-face communication (as more efficient than written documentation); frequent delivery of new deployable business value; tight, self-organizing teams; ways to work such that the inevitable requirements churn was not a crisis. Early 2001 saw a workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA, where various originators and practitioners of these methodologies met to figure out just what it was they had in common. They picked the word "agile" for an umbrella term and crafted the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, whose most important part was a statement of shared values:Manifesto for Agile Software Development close collaboration self-organizing teams frequent delivery face-to-face communication requirements churn not a crisis

32 What do we mean by Agile … ? Manifesto for Agile Software Development Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

33 What is Agile? “While interest in agile methodologies has blossomed in the past few years, its roots go back more than a decade. Teams using early versions of Scrum, Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM), and adaptive software development (ASD) were delivering successful projects in the early- to mid-1990s” Jim Highsmith – Director, Cutter Consortium DSDM recognises the role of the Business Analyst B A

34 Let’s try it the old way …! Task: To specify the requirements for a house you’d like to have someone build for you (about 20 requirements)

35 Detailed Requirements Foundations Walls Bathroom Kitchen Jacuzzi Bath Sink Flooring Plasma TV Lighting Square, pink basin Satin steel taps Pop-up rubber plug Chrome overflow Integrated soap dish Tubular chrome frame Chrome u-bend Chrome waste pipe

36 Agile Approach … Not the detailed Functional Spec… Prioritised, High-level Requirements R1 ………M R2 ………M R3 ………S R4………. S R5 ………M R6 ………M R7 ………S R8 ………S R9 ………S …………. ……….. ……… R76 ………C R77 ……C ……….. R80 ………S De Funct. Spec requirements churn not a crisis

37 Prioritisation M M ust have O S S hould have C C ould have O W W on’t have this time M S C WM requirements churn not a crisis

38 Group Exercise Your task: Prioritise the top 20 High-Level requirements for the house you’d like to have built, to show at least the “Must Have” requirements Note: To PRIORITISE effectively you need a clearly-stated objective!

39 Agile, DSDM Teams  self-directed  small (no more than six)  composed of users and developers with equal responsibility Business and IT in PARTNERSHIP underpinned by a team success approach and a “no blame” culture close collaboration self-organizing teams face-to-face communication

40 OBJECTIVES: Boundaries Decision Commitment Approval Facilitated Workshops A team-based information gathering and decision making technique interactive communication empowered personnel independent facilitator close collaboration face-to-face communication

41 Delivery Deadline M M M S C M M M S C M S C C S Prioritised, High-level Requirements R1 ………M R2 ………M R3 ………S A Cunning, Timeboxed Plan! Timebox M M S C M DSDM Feasibility Study Business Study Foundations and Shell Internal Services Bathroom & Kitchen Living Rooms and Bedrooms frequent delivery requirements churn not a crisis

42 The BIG delivery JanFebMarAprMay Small but complete deliveries Iterative and incremental investigate refine consolidate

43 Modelling Perspectives Locations and Network Links WHERE WHY WHO WHEN WHATHOW Rationale, ends and means People and Tasks Events, time and scheduling Data and Relationships Processes and Inputs/Outputs

44 Why DSDM? An agile business analyst’s “charter” Recognises the importance of analysis and modelling, where other agile approaches do not specify this.

45 DSDM Overview Guidance Quality and Testing Configuration Management Planning Risk White Papers Teams Roles and Responsibilities Guidance on team working 9 Principles Business Focus People, process, technology Techniques Facilitated Workshops Prototyping Modelling Timeboxing Philosophy 80/20 MoSCoW (Must, Should, Could, Wont Have) Prototype Life-cycle (Framework) Phases Products objectives DSDM

46 Summary: What is Agile Business Analysis? close collaboration between the development and business experts; face-to-face communication (as more efficient than written documentation); frequent delivery of new deployable business value; tight, self-organizing teams; ways to work such that the inevitable requirements churn is not a crisis. AND High level Requirements MoSCoW Timeboxing Facilitated Workshops Modelling … and the BA makes sure it happens!! B A

47 Summary: What is Agile Business Analysis? close collaboration between the development and business experts; face-to-face communication (as more efficient than written documentation); frequent delivery of new deployable business value; tight, self-organizing teams; ways to work such that the inevitable requirements churn is not a crisis. AND High level Requirements MoSCoW Timeboxing Facilitated Workshops Modelling … and the BA makes sure it happens!! B A

48 Agile Business Analysis Dot Tudor TCC Training and Consultancy ISEB Business Analysis, PRINCE2, DSDM,

49 Competencies – the Demand side Employers and Jobs Qualifications – the Supply side Employees and Training Providers Standard definitions and approaches Employers, Jobs, Employees and Training Providers

50

51 ISEB Qualifications in the area of Business Analysis and Business Change Foundation Level: Foundation Certificate in IT-enabled Business Change NEW Individual Practitioner Level Certificates: Business Analysis Essentials Requirements Engineering Organisational Context (formerly Business Organisation) Modelling Business Processes Systems Development Essentials Systems Modelling Techniques Benefits Management and Business Acceptance Under development Higher Level: The Diploma in Business Analysis

52 And now ………. ISEB Professional in Business Analysis Currently being piloted with 3 employers Part of the ongoing definition of a series of Professional roles Involves:  Qualifications in own specialist discipline  Qualifications in other supporting disciplines  Experience in own discipline  Leadership, coaching and mentoring  Ethics  Interpersonal skills


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