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Mapping and natural resources governance in small island communities ICFRE DG’s Visitto IUCN ARO, 1 February 2012 Mangroves for the Future Role of Forestry.

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Presentation on theme: "Mapping and natural resources governance in small island communities ICFRE DG’s Visitto IUCN ARO, 1 February 2012 Mangroves for the Future Role of Forestry."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mapping and natural resources governance in small island communities ICFRE DG’s Visitto IUCN ARO, 1 February 2012 Mangroves for the Future Role of Forestry in the context of Eco-Civilization

2 2 Background: Indian Ocean tsunami, 2004 The December 2004 tsunami devastated the countries of the Indian Ocean rim and created a large-scale humanitarian crisis. Serious environmental impacts arose from the tsunami and from post-disaster reconstruction. The tsunami brought deeper problems facing coastal ecosystems and livelihoods sharply into focus.

3 3 Root causes Coastal areas were already fragile from decades of mangrove clearing, coral reefs damage, over-fishing and pollution. This weakened the resilience of the human populations and natural ecosystems. The demand for a longer-term initiative to strengthen coastal ecosystems and livelihoods begun to emerge about a year after the tsunami had struck.

4 4 Call to action In early 2006, IUCN and UNDP lead development of a framework initiative on ecosystem restoration and conservation. UN Special Envoy on Tsunami Recovery Former US President Bill Clinton supports MFF. New York meeting in April Consultations, Strategy and Action Plan and agreement on governance structure and partners. MFF was launched in Phuket, Thailand in December 2006 by President Clinton. “Build back better” - US President Bill Clinton, Special Envoy on Tsunami Recovery

5 5 The MFF region Member : Bangladesh India Indonesia Maldives Pakistan Seychelles Sri Lanka Thailand Viet Nam Outreach: Cambodia Myanmar Timor Leste Dialogue: Kenya Malaysia Tanzania

6 6 MFF’s Principles Policy-relevant – supporting national legal and policy frameworks People-centered – assisting coastal populations of the Indian Ocean Partnership-based – seeking to meet the needs of all partners Investment-orientated – recognizing coastal ecosystems as valuable natural infrastructure

7 7 Regional Steering Committee (RSC) National Coordinating Bodies (NCB) (Government, NGOs, Private Sector) Supported by National Coordinators and Secretariat Projects Governance structure: A partnership for implementation SECRETARIAT

8 8 MFF’s vision Healthy coastal ecosystems for a more prosperous and secure future for all coastal communities

9 9 MFF’s Goal Conservation, restoration and sustainable management of coastal ecosystems as key natural infrastructure which supports human well-being and security.

10 10 Objectives 1. Knowledge Improve, share and apply knowledge to support the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of coastal ecosystems. 2. Empowerment Strengthen Integrated Coastal Management institutions and empower civil society (including local communities) to engage in decision-making and management that conserves, restores and sustainably uses coastal ecosystems. 3. Governance Enhance coastal governance at all levels (regional, national, provincial, district and community) to encourage integrated management programmes and investments that are ecologically and socio-economically sound and promote human well-being and security.

11 11 Knowledge 1.Knowledge base for coastal management 2.Ecologically and socio-economically sound rehabilitation 3.‘Reef-to-ridge’ approaches 4.Ecosystem valuation 5.Environmental evaluation of post- tsunami response. Knowledge 1.Knowledge base for coastal management 2.Ecologically and socio-economically sound rehabilitation 3.‘Reef-to-ridge’ approaches 4.Ecosystem valuation 5.Environmental evaluation of post- tsunami response. Empowerment 6.Civil society awareness and participation in decision-making 7.Building capacity of coastal managers 8.Environmentally sustainable livelihoods 9.Community resilience to natural disasters 10.Sustainable financing mechanisms Empowerment 6.Civil society awareness and participation in decision-making 7.Building capacity of coastal managers 8.Environmentally sustainable livelihoods 9.Community resilience to natural disasters 10.Sustainable financing mechanisms Governance 11.National integrated coastal management programmes 12.Environmental and social safeguards in land use planning 13.Marine and coastal protected areas 14.Adaptive coastal management 15.Environmentally sound business practices Governance 11.National integrated coastal management programmes 12.Environmental and social safeguards in land use planning 13.Marine and coastal protected areas 14.Adaptive coastal management 15.Environmentally sound business practices From strategy to action… 15 PROGRAMMES OF WORK Climate Change, Gender Equality and Knowledge Management and Communications are Cross-Cutting

12 12 MFF implementation modalities NCB Support Programme: NCB Work Plan (2013: USD 120K per country) Small Grant Facility (Project limit: USD 25K) Themes and projects approved by NCB Contract signed by IUCN/UNDP country office Oversight by NCB Medium Grants Facility (Project limit USD 100K) Themes and projects approved by NCB External Review Process Contract signed by MFF Secretariat Oversight by NCB and MFF Secretariat Regional Grants Facility (Project limit: USD 200K) Themes and projects approved by RSC External Review process Contract signed by MFF Secretariat Oversight by MFF Secretariat

13 13 China In 2012 China received Outreach support from MFF to learn about the MFF initiative and processes and to develop a coastal programme for the four southern coastal provinces of China. A Sino-Vietnam transboundary coastal project opportunity was developed engaging NCB Vietnam and covers geographic area; –Quang Ninh Province, Vietnam & coastal protected areas of the Red River Delta –Southern coastal provinces of China; Guangxi, Guangdong, Fujian & Hainan

14 14 Builds upon Letter of Cooperation between Vietnam Agency for Seas and Islands, State Ocean Administration, IUCN Viet Nam and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA signed in 2008, and on the; Discussion at APFNet workshop in Beihai, China in November 2012 which re-established that there were mutual interests between Vietnam and the southern China provinces in various aspects of mangrove ecosystem management: increasing the sustainable use benefits to local people from mangroves Basis for Transboundary Collaboration

15 15 Main focus of Transboundary Collaboration Providing opportunities for Viet Nam and China to convene and facilitate dialogues with key stakeholders from Viet Nam’s Quang Ninh Province and China’s Guangxi and Hainan provinces, in relation to further and develop the transboundary management interests and potential areas for cooperation in the Sino-Viet Nam coastal region. The specific nature of transboundary cooperation between China and Viet Nam will take various forms, including exchange of information and experience through joint workshops, study tours, and training courses. Focus on province-to-province, university-to-university and protected area to protected area cooperation, but would also aim to foster closer cooperation at the national and regional levels through association with the work of MFF and other regional organizations, programmes and projects, like APFNet, Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA) and Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis of the Indochina Mangrove Ecosystems Project (TDA-IME)

16 16 Thank you!


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