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Field Photography for Diagnosis. This presentation is intended to assist First Detectors in capturing and submitting effective digital photos to support.

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Presentation on theme: "Field Photography for Diagnosis. This presentation is intended to assist First Detectors in capturing and submitting effective digital photos to support."— Presentation transcript:

1 Field Photography for Diagnosis

2 This presentation is intended to assist First Detectors in capturing and submitting effective digital photos to support plant disease diagnostics. This presentation is intended to help you understand… different types of digital cameras available the use of digital photography in relaying important information to diagnosticians post-processing techniques for editing images lab requirements for digital image submission

3 First Detectors in the Field Note and record observations. Ask questions. Bring a cell phone to call your local extension office. Recreate the scenario for those who cannot be in the field using digital images! Photo credit: Joseph LaForest, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org, # County agent in Georgia

4 You are walking through the field and notice that the crop appears unhealthy, and you are unsure about the source of the problem. What do you do? a) Take a plant sample to give to your county agricultural agent. b) Take a series of photos of the field including the affected plants and close ups of signs or symptoms for your county agricultural agent. c) Ignore the signs and symptoms because they cannot be harvested. This is a good idea. Work with your local county extension office to get a sample submitted to your state diagnostic lab. Good idea. A series of digital images is often helpful when submitted with a plant sample. These images are also important if a live sample is difficult to get to the diagnostician. No. Ignoring the unhealthy crop may lead to larger problems.

5 Digital Image Submission Successes Photo credit: Florida DDIS, 2003 Weed/Plant ID73% Plant Disease25% Crop Insects68% Insects non-crop50% Nutritional and Cultural problems 8 %

6 Getting Started: First Detectors & Field Photography Be prepared! Bring a camera to the field. Digital images are useful for enhancing accurate documentation. Digital images overcome obstacles of speed, distance and sample degradation. Photo credit: Stephanie Stocks, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

7 ‘Point and Shoot’ Camera Options Digital SLR Camera Photo credit: Stephanie Stocks, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

8 ‘Point and Shoot’ Cameras Advantages Small and lightweight Zoom and macro capabilities Inexpensive Disadvantages Automatic settings may be difficult to override Camera is usually not part of an expandable system Photo credit: Stephanie Stocks, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

9 Digital SLR Cameras Advantages Manual settings accommodate difficult lighting Belongs to a system of interchangeable parts to expand capabilities Disadvantages Large and heavy Expensive Photo credit: Stephanie Stocks, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

10 Digital SLR System Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

11 Characteristics of Poor Quality Photos Out of focus Shadows Poor lighting Busy background Photo credit: Dawn Dailey O’Brien, Cornell University.

12 Characteristics of Good Quality Images Sharply Focused Good Exposure Proper Lighting Uniform Background A Series of Images Photo credit: Dawn Dailey O’Brien, Cornell University, bugwood.org, #

13 Characteristics of Good Quality Images Sharply Focused —Focus and Macro —Camera/Specimen Stability Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

14 Sharply Focused: Focus and Macro Mode Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

15 Sharply Focused: Camera and Specimen Stability Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

16 Characteristics of Good Quality Images Good exposure —ISO Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Good exposure will look like a bell curve in the histogram. ← Good Exposure ← Under exposed ← Over exposed

17 Good Exposure: ISO Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Under-exposedOver-exposed

18 In P mode: Add or subtract exposure by adjusting the F-stop value. (Check your camera manual.) Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Good Exposure: ISO

19 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Good Exposure: ISO

20 Characteristics of Good Quality Images Proper Lighting ― Photographer’s Body Position ― Flash (ON/OFF)

21 Front Lighting Proper Lighting: Photographer’s Body Position Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

22 Back lighting Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Proper Lighting: Photographer’s Body Position

23 Transparency and Back lighting Proper Lighting: Photographer’s Body Position Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

24 Shadows here are distracting to the diagnostician With Shadow Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Proper Lighting: Photographer’s Body Position

25 Flash ONFlash OFF Photo credit: Dawn Dailey O’Brien, Cornell University. Proper Lighting: Flash ON/OFF

26 Photo credit: Dawn Dailey O’Brien, Cornell University. Characteristics of Good Quality Images Uniform Background

27 Characteristics of Good Quality Images What is the size of the outbreak? Is the problem isolated or spread out? Are there patterns? Are there visible signs and symptoms? Symptom variability? What plant part(s) are affected? Host specificity? Are there environmental conditions that contribute? A Series of Images Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

28 First Detector Photography Tools Scale Gray card Notebook and/or audio clips for documentation Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

29 Post Processing Download images from camera to computer Open images in an image editing program (i.e. Adobe Photoshop or Photoshop Elements) Delete pictures that are out of focus, blurred, or exposed poorly Use editing tools (such as Levels) to optimize exposure Fix color balance Reduce file size for

30 Post Processing: Exposure Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University

31 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Exposure

32 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Exposure

33 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Exposure

34 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Color Imbalances

35 Select the middle eyedropper and then click on the gray card. The result is an image that looks like how it appears in real live. Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Color Imbalances

36 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

37 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

38 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

39 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

40 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

41 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

42 Photo credit: Kent Loeffler, Cornell University Post Processing: Reduce File Size for

43 Diagnostician Requirements Appropriate documentation using digital photography and a written detailed description. Up to 5 photos that visually recreate what was observed in the field File(s) sized for viewing on a computer Biological samples to assist or confirm diagnosis. —See NPDN Sample Submission module for instructions

44 Contact: —Always check with your state diagnostician if you have sample questions To find your local NPDN lab or for more information on the NPDN —www.npdn.org NPDN First Detector Training Website —www.firstdetector.org Questions?

45 Authors Kent Loeffler, Cornell University, Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Rachel L. McCarthy, NEPDN Education and Training Coordinator, Department of Plant Pathology and Plant- Microbe Biology, Cornell University Amy Peterson Dunfee, NCPDN Teaching and Education Coordinator Dept. of Plant Pathology Michigan State University

46 Editors Lyle J. Buss, M.S., Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida Eric LeVeen, B.S., Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida Stephanie Stocks, M.S., Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida

47 Reviewers Richard Hoenisch M.S., WPDN, Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis Gail Ruhl, M.S., Department of Plant Pathology, Purdue University Sharon Dobesh, M.S., Associate Director, GPDN, Kansas State University

48 NPDN Partners United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA APHIS PPQ) Local and Regional Integrated Pest Management Programs Cooperative Agriculture Pest Survey Program (CAPS) National Plant board and State Departments of Agriculture Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health (Bugwood)

49 Publication Details This publication can be used for non-profit, educational use only purposes. Photographers retain copyright to photographs or other images contained in this publication as cited. This material was developed as part of the NPDN First Detector Training Course. Authors and the website should be properly cited. Images or photographs should also be properly cited and credited to the original source. Original Publication Date: December 2006 Updated August 2013


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