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Outcome-based garden program planning, evaluation & funding www.gardening.cornell.edu Cultivating Community with Garden-Based Learning Programs Webinar.

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Presentation on theme: "Outcome-based garden program planning, evaluation & funding www.gardening.cornell.edu Cultivating Community with Garden-Based Learning Programs Webinar."— Presentation transcript:

1 Outcome-based garden program planning, evaluation & funding Cultivating Community with Garden-Based Learning Programs Webinar Session 4 March 21, 2012 Lori J. Brewer Cornell Garden-Based Learning Adult and Family Education

2 Session objectives: Describe the basics in outcome focused project planning. Illustrate the logic model planning tool. Outline evaluation basics. Consider funding basics. Participants share planning, evaluation and funding resources.

3 Getting Started with a Plan 1.Outline the situation. 2.Outline the response. Inputs (human, physical & financial). Activities. Outputs (who is suppose to participate). 3.Outline the desired outcomes (As a result of the activities…).

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5 Logic Model Planning Tool

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7 Logic Model example

8 Benefits of Evaluation Demonstrate accountability to stakeholders including participants and funders. Generate a much clearer picture of program outcomes and impacts. Continue or increase support of the garden and programming. Create an opportunity to: Increase participant satisfaction and success. Streamline and improve programs. Discovering new activities or ways of aggregating tasks. Collect vital feedback about the program providers. Alter the garden and program to better meet participants’ critical needs. Find positive secondary outcomes.

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11 Qualitative Evaluation Examples of this include: Interviewing garden program participants (representative quotes can be powerful additions to reports) Observing garden activities Videotaping the garden and participants (which is also great for accountability) Recording the artwork for and about the garden created by participants Encouraging gardeners to keep a journal Training participants to interview and record each other’s thoughts (both gaining program managers valuable data and teaching participants interview skills)

12 Funding Strategies For most community and school garden projects, the general rule of thumb is to start small and operate the garden on a non-cash basis for the first year or two. Friends of Burlington Gardens & the Vermont Community Garden Network (http://www.burlingtongardens.org/) Relationship Building through Grassroots Fundraising Scavenge Borrow Donation Mini-grants Volunteers Community

13 The Nonprofit Sector in Brief by Wing et al. Giving USA 2010 The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2009, Executive Summary.

14 Getting Started with a Project Folder Succinct, well written one-page description of your program. Define the problem, need or situation that motivates the organization’s mission. Address the way the organization is uniquely contributing to creative solutions. Letter of endorsement and support from the key partners. Photo page, positive feedback, anecdotes, and evaluation data. Garden plan or design. List of key project leaders, participants, and volunteers. Specific, realistic and concise list of your project needs. Contributors in the community to date.

15 Beyond Local Funding Sources communitygarden.org/connect (look in newsletters)

16 Resources Not garden specific lots related to using logic model For sale publication Friends of Burlington Gardens & the Vermont Community Garden Network

17 QUESTIONS? Lori J Brewer Cornell Garden-Based Learning Adult and Family Education Session objectives: Describe the basics in outcome focused project planning. Illustrate the logic model planning tool. Outline evaluation basics. Consider funding basics. Participants share planning, evaluation and funding resources.

18 Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U. S. Department of Defense under Award No Developed in partnership with Purdue University and Cornell University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Military-Extension Partnership


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