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Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Successful Memory Raises Achievement Marilee Sprenger.

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Presentation on theme: "Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Successful Memory Raises Achievement Marilee Sprenger."— Presentation transcript:

1 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Successful Memory Raises Achievement Marilee Sprenger

2 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement SEMANTIC PROCEDURAL EPISODICEMOTIONAL CONDITIONED RESPONSE EXPLICIT MEMORY IMPLICIT MEMORY

3 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement

4 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement

5 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Sensory Immediate Working & Emotional Working Long-term Working Long-term Working & Emotional Reach Reflect Recode/Reinforce RehearseReview Retrieve

6 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Category Percentile Gain Identifying Similarities and Differences45 Summarizing and Note taking34 Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition29 Homework and Practice28 Nonlinguistic Representations27 Cooperative Learning27 Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback23 Generating and Testing Hypotheses23 Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers22 Instructional Strategies that Affect Achievement

7 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement REMEMBERING : Recognize, list, describe, identify, retrieve, name… Can the student RECALL information? UNDERSTANDING: Interpret, exemplify, summarize, infer, paraphrase … Can the student EXPLAIN ideas or concepts? APPLYING: Implement, carry out, use … Can the student USE the new knowledge in another familiar situation? ANALYZING: Compare, attribute, organize, deconstruct … Can the student DIFFERENTIATE between constituent parts? EVALUATING: Check, critique, judge hypothesize … Can the student JUSTIFY a decision or course of action? CREATING: Design, construct, plan, produce … Can the student GENERATE new products, ideas or ways of viewing things ? The New Bloom

8 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Retrieve Review Rehearse Reflect Recode Reach Reinforce

9 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Reach: Getting into Sensory Memory If you can’t reach them, you can’t teach them. Attention Motivation Emotion Meaning Relationships Novelty Advance Organizers Relevancy

10 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Reflect: Thinking about Learning Reflection is not a luxury; it is a necessity. Wait time Seven Habits of Highly Reflective Classrooms: 1.Question 2.Visualize 3.Journal 4.Thinking Directives 5.PMI 6.Collaborate 7.Four Corners

11 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Recode: Making it Their Own Self-generated material is better recalled Interpret Exemplify Classify Summarize Infer Compare Explain Non-linguistics

12 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Reinforce Feedback is vital to learning. Motivational Feedback Informational Feedback Developmental Feedback Extinction Socratic Questioning

13 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Rehearse: Practice makes Perfect We remember better the more fully we process new subject matter Rote Elaborative Sleep Spacing Homework and Practice Multiple Pathways Multiple Episodes

14 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Review: Preparing for the Test Whereas rehearsal puts information in long-term memory, review presents the opportunity to retrieve that information and manipulate it in working memory. The products of the manipulation can then be returned to long-term memory. 1. Match the review to instruction and assessment. 2. Check for accuracy of the memory. 3. Give students the conditions to use higher level thinking skills to analyze, evaluate, and possibility create alternative ways to use the knowledge. 4. Strengthen the existing networks. 5. For high stakes testing, practice similar questions under similar conditions. 6. Eliminate cramming.

15 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Review Schedules Old Method Initial Instruction Assessment Greater Memory Method Initial Instruction Assessment = Review Review Schedules. Cramming reviews in right before the test doesn’t give the brain time to build long-term memory. Spacing reviews throughout the learning and increasing the time between them gradually allows long-term networks to be strengthened. Adapted from Jeb Schenck (2000)

16 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Retrieve: Access and Transfer Retrieval is most successful when the context and the cues that were present when the material was first learned are the same as the context and the cues that are present later when making an attempt to recall. Type of assessment Specific cues Recognition techniques Recall Stress

17 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Anderson, L., Krathwohl, D., Airasian, P., Cruikshank, K., Mayer, R., Pintrich, P., Raths, J., & Wittrock, M. (Eds.). (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing. New York: Longman. Bourtchouladze, R.(2002). Memories are made of this. London: Columbia University Press. DeFina, P. (2003), The neurobiology of memory: Understand, apply, and assess student memory. Speaker: Learning and the Brain Conference. Cambridge, MA. Dewey, J. (1997). How we think. New York: Dover Publishers. Eichenbaum, H. (2003). Speaker. The neurobiology of learning and memory.Learning and the Brain Conference. Cambridge, MA Marzano, R., Pickering, D., and Pollack, J. (2001). Classroom instruction that works. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. NWREL. (2002). Research you can use to improve results. originally prepared by Kathleen Cotton, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL), Portland, OR, and published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) in Sprenger, Marilee. (1999). Learning and Memory, The Brain in Action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Sprenger, Marilee. (2005). How to teach so students remember. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Squire, L. and E. Kandel. (1999). Memory, From Mind to Molecules. New York: Scientific American Library.

18 Marilee Sprenger 9:45 – 10:45 December 8, 2005Successful Memory Raises Achievement Available in Exhibit Hall


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