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Chapter 6 Personality and Psychographics 6-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 6 Personality and Psychographics 6-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 6 Personality and Psychographics 6-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon

2 6-2 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Objectives When you finish this chapter, you should understand why: 1. A consumer’s personality influences the way he or she responds to marketing stimuli, but efforts to use this information in marketing contexts meet with mixed results.

3 6-3 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Objectives When you finish this chapter, you should understand why: 2. Psychographics go beyond simple demographics to help marketers. understand and reach different segments. 3. Consumer activities can be harmful to individuals and to society.

4 Learning Objective 1 A consumer’s personality influences the way he or she responds to marketing stimuli, but efforts to use this information in marketing contexts meet with mixed results. 6-4 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

5 6-5 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Motivational Research and Consumption Motives Power-masculinity- virility Security Eroticism Moral purity- cleanliness Social acceptance Individuality Status Femininity Reward Mastery over environment Disalienation Magic-mystery

6 6-6 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Neo-Freudian Theories Karen Horney Compliant versus detached versus aggressive Alfred Adler Motivation to overcome inferiority Harry Stack Sullivan Personality evolves to reduce anxiety Carl Jung Developed analytical psychology

7 6-7 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Carl Jung, Father of Analytical Psychology Disciple of Freud Established concept of collective unconscious Explained the creation of archetypes Old wise man Earth mother Young & Rubicam uses the concept of archetypes in its BrandAsset ® Archetypes model

8 6-8 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Figure 6.1 BrandAsset Valuator Archetypes

9 6-9 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Figure 6.1 BrandAsset Valuator Archetype (continued)

10 6-10 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Trait Theory Personality traits: identifiable characteristics that define a person Traits relevant to consumer behavior: Innovativeness Materialism Self-consciousness Need for cognition Frugality

11 6-11 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Brand Personality Brand personality: set of traits people attribute to a product as if it were a person Brand equity: extent to which a consumer holds strong, favorable, and unique associations with a brand in memory—and the extent to which she or he is willing to pay more for the branded version of a product than for a nonbranded (generic) version

12 6-12 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Table 6.2 Brand Behaviors and Possible Personality Trait Inferences Brand Action Trait Inference Brand is repositioned several times or changes slogan repeatedly Flighty, schizophrenic Brand uses continuing character in advertisingFamiliar, comfortable Brand charges high prices and uses exclusive distribution Snobbish, sophisticated Brand frequently available on dealCheap, uncultured Brand offers many line extensionsVersatile, adaptable

13 For Reflection How can marketers link a brand’s personality with the lifestyle of a consumer segment? 6-13 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

14 Learning Objective 2 Psychographics go beyond simple demographics to help marketers understand and reach different consumer segments Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

15 Psychographic Studies Lifestyle profiles Product-specific profiles General lifestyle segmentation Product-specific segmentation 6-15 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

16 6-16 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Table 6.3 Lifestyle Dimensions ActivitiesInterestsOpinionsDemographics WorkFamilyThemselvesAge HobbiesHomeSocial issuesEducation Social eventsJobPoliticsIncome VacationCommunityBusinessOccupation EntertainmentRecreationEconomicsFamily size Club membershipFashionEducationDwelling CommunityFoodProductsGeography ShoppingMediaFutureCity size SportsAchievementsCultureStage in life cycle

17 6-17 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Psychographic Segmentation Uses To define target market To create new view of market To position product To better communicate product attributes To develop product strategy To market social/political issues

18 6-18 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Figure 6.2 VALS2 TM

19 6-19 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Geodemography Geodemography involves using data on consumer expenditures and other socioeconomic factors with geographic information about the areas in which people live to identify consumers who share common consumption patterns “Birds of a feature flock together” Can be reached more economically (e.g., zip code in Redondo Beach, CA)

20 6-20 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall For Reflection Construct separate advertising executions for a cosmetics product targeted to the Belonger, Achiever, Experiencer, and Maker VALS types. How would the basic appeal differ for each group?

21 6-21 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall For Reflection Geodemographic techniques assume that people who live in the same neighborhood have other things in common as well. Why do they make this assumption, and how accurate is it?

22 Learning Objective 3 Consumer activities can be harmful to individuals and to society Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

23 Dark Sides Consumer terrorism Addictive consumption Compulsive consumption Consumed consumers Illegal activities 6-23 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

24 For Reflection Give two examples of consumer addiction. Should marketers play a role in helping consumers avoid the dark side? 6-24 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

25 6-25 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Summary Consumer personality influences the way one responds to marketing stimuli Lifestyles are an important aid to many marketing strategies Psychographics go beyond simple demographics to help marketers understand different consumer segments Identifying patterns of consumption are valuable components of a lifestyle marketing strategy


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