Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Interoperability of a Scalable Distributed Data Manager with an Object-relational DBMS Thesis presentation Yakham NDIAYE November, 13 the 2001 November,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Interoperability of a Scalable Distributed Data Manager with an Object-relational DBMS Thesis presentation Yakham NDIAYE November, 13 the 2001 November,"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Interoperability of a Scalable Distributed Data Manager with an Object-relational DBMS Thesis presentation Yakham NDIAYE November, 13 the 2001 November, 13 the 2001

2 2 u Develop techniques for the interoperability of a DBMS with an external SDDS file. u Examine various architectural issues, making such a coupling the most efficient. u Validate our technical choices by the prototyping and the experimental performances analysis. u Our approach is at the crossing the main memory DBMS, the object-relational-DBMS with the foreign functions, and the distributed/parallel DBMS. Objective

3 3 u Multicomputers u SDDSs u AMOS-II & DB2 DBMSs u Coupling SDDS and AMOS-II u Coupling SDDS and DB2 u Experimental analysis u Conclusion Plan

4 4 Multicomputers u A collection of loosely coupled computers ­Computers inter-connected by high-speed local area networks. u Cost/Performance ­offers potentially storage and processing capabilities rivaling a supercomputer at a fraction of the cost.  New architectural concepts ­offer to applications the cumulated CPU and storage capabilities of a large number of inter-connected computers.

5 5 New data structures specifically for Multicomputers Data are structured - records with keys parallel scans & function shipping Data are on servers - waiting for access Overflowing servers split into new servers - appended to the file without informing the clients Queries come from multiple autonomous clients - Access initiators - Not using any centralized directory for access computations See for more : SDDS

6 6 u AMOS-II : Active Mediating Object System u A main memory database system. u Declarative query language : AMOSQL. u External data sources capability. u External program interfaces AMOS-II using : - Call-level interface (call-in) - Foreign functions (call-out) u See the AMOS-II page for more: AMOS-II DBMS

7 7 u IBM object-relational DBMS « DB2 Universal Database ». u Typical representative of a commercial relational-object DBMS. u Capabilities to handle external data through the user-defined functions (UDF). DB2 Universal Database

8 8 Coupling Strategies u AMOS-SDDS Strategy : - for a scalable RAM file supporting database queries - Use a DBMS for manipulations best handled through by the query language ; - Direct fast data access for manipulations not supported well, or at all, by a DBMS ; - Distributed queries processing with functions shipping.

9 9 AMOS-SDDS System AMOS-SDDS scalable parallel query processing

10 10 Coupling Strategies u SD-AMOS Strategy : - Uses AMOS-II as the memory manager at each SDDS storage site ; - Scalable generalization of a parallel DBMS ; - Data partitioning becomes dynamic.

11 11 SD-AMOS System SD-AMOS scalable parallel query processing

12 12 Couplage SDDS & DB2 u DB2-SDDS Strategy : - Coupling of a DBMS with an external data repository with direct fast data access. - Use of a SDDS file by a DBMS like an external data repository. - Offer to the user an interface more elaborate than that of SDDS manager, in particular by his query language.

13 13 Coupling SDDS & DB2 DB2-SDDS Overall Architecture Register a user-defined external table function : CREATE FUNCTION scan(Varchar(20)) RETURNS TABLE (ssn integer, name Varchar(20), city Varchar(20)) EXTERNAL NAME ‘interface!fullscan'

14 14 Coupling SDDS & DB2 Foreign functions to access SDDS records from DB2 : range(cleMin, cleMax) -> liste enregistrements dont cleMin < clé < cleMax scan(nom_fichier)-> liste de tous les enregistrements du fichier Sample queries : - Parallel scan All SDDS records. select * from table( scan(‘fichier’) ) as table_sdds(SSN, NAME,CITY) - Range query SDDS records where key between 1 and 100. select * from table( range(1, 100) ) as table_sdds(SSN, NAME,CITY) order by Name

15 15 u Six Pentium III 700 MHz with 256 MB of RAM running Windows 2000 u On a 100Mbit/s Ethernet network. u One site is used as Client and the five other as Servers u We run many servers at the same machine (up to 3 per machine). u File scaled from 1 to 15 servers. The Hardware

16 16 u Benchmark data : ­Table Person (SS#, Name, City). ­Size 20,000 to 300,000 tuples of 25 bytes. ­50 Cities. ­Random distribution. u Benchmark query : « couples of persons in the same city » ­Query 1, the file resides at a single AMOS-II. ­Query 2, the file resides at AMOS-SDDS. ­Join evaluation : Two strategies. u Measures : - Speed-up & Scale-up u Processing time of aggregate functions Benchmark queries

17 17 Server Query Processing u E-strategy ­Data stay external to AMOS » within the SDDS bucket ­Custom foreign functions perform the query u I-strategy ­Data are dynamically imported into AMOS-II » Possibly with the local index creation » Deleted after the processing » Good for joins ­AMOS performs the query

18 18 Speed-up Elapsed time of Query 2 according to the strategy for a file of 20,000 records, distributed over 1 to 5 servers. Server nodes12345 Elapsed time(s)1, Time per tuple (ms) Serveur nodes12345 Nested-loop(s) Index lookup(s) I-Strategy for Query 2: elapsed time E-Strategy for Query 2: elapsed time Elapsed time per tuple of Query 2 according to the strategy

19 19 u The results showed an important advantage of I-Strategy on E- Strategy for the evaluation of the join query. u For 5 servers, the rate is 6 times for the nested loop, and 9 times if an index is creates. u The favorable result makes us study the scale-up characteristics of AMOS-SDDS on a file that scales up to 300,000 tuples. Discussion

20 20 Scaling the number of servers Elapsed time of join queries to AMOS-SDDS File size20,00060,000100,000160,000200,000240,000300,000 # SDDS servers Q1 (ms) Q2 (ms) Q1 w. extrap. (ms) Q2 w. extrap. (ms) AMOS-II (ms) Q1 = AMOS-SDDS join; Q2 = AMOS-SDDS join with count. Time per tuple (extrapolated for AMOS-SDDS)

21 21 Scaling the number of servers Expected time per tuple of join queries to AMOS-SDDS u Results are extrapolated to 1 server per machine. - Basically, the CPU component of the elapsed time is divided by 3 u The extrapolation of the processing time of the join query with count shows a linear scalability of the system. u Processing time per tuple remains constant (2.94ms) when the file size and the number of servers increase by the same factor.

22 22 Aggregate Function count Elapsed time of aggregate function Count # servers12345 E-Stratégie (ms) 10 I-Stratégie (ms) 1, Elapsed times for AMOS-II = 280ms Elapsed time of aggregate functions Count under AMOS-SDDS Elapsed time over 100,000-tuple file on AMOS-SDDS

23 23 Aggregate Function max Elapsed time of aggregate function Max #servers12345 I-Stratégie (ms) I-Stratégie (ms) 1, Elapsed times for AMOS-II = 471ms Elapsed time over 100,000-tuple file on AMOS-SDDS Elapsed time of aggregate functions Max under AMOS-SDDS

24 24 u Contrary to the join query, the external strategy is gaining for the evaluation of aggregate functions. u For count function, improvement is about 34 times. u For max function, improvement is about 4 times. u Due to the importation cost and to a SDDS property : the current number of records is a parameter of a bucket. u Linear Speed-up : processing time decreases with the number of servers. u The use of the external functions can thus be very advantageous for certain kind of operations. Discussion

25 25 SD-AMOS performance measurements Creation time of 3,000,000 records file. The bucket size is 750,000 records of 100 bytes Global and moving average insertion time of a record

26 26 SD-AMOS performance measurements Elapsed time of range query Average time per tuple

27 27 u The average insertion time of a record with the splits is of 0.15ms. u The average access time to a record on a distributed file is of 0.12ms. - It is 100 times faster than that with a traditional file on disc. u Linear scalability : The insertion time and the access time per tuple remains constant when the file size and the number of servers increase. Discussion

28 28 DB2-SDDS performance measurements Elapsed time of range query Time per tuple (i) access time to the data in a DB2 table, (ii) access time to SDDS file from the DB2 external functions (DB2-SDDS) and (iii) direct access time to SDDS file from a SDDS client.

29 29 u Access time to SDDS file is much faster than the access time to a DB2 table: 0.02ms versus 0.07ms. u Access time to external data from DB2 (0.08ms), is less fast than the access to the internal data (0.07ms). Coupling cost u An application has : - fast direct access to the data - through the DBMS, access by the query language Discussion

30 30 u We have coupled a SDDS manager with a main-memory DBMS AMOS-II and DB2 to improve the current technologies for high- performance databases and for the coupling with external data repositories. u The experiments we have reported in the Thesis prove the efficiency of the system.  AMOS-SDDS et DB2-SDDS : use of a SDDS file by a DBMS and the parallel query processing on the server sites. u SD-AMOS : appears as a scalable generalisation of a parallel main-memory DBMS where the data partitioning becomes automatic. Conclusion

31 31 u Other types of DBMS queries. u Client's scalable distributed query decomposer. u challenging appears the design of a scalable distributed query optimizer handling the dynamic data partitioning. Future Work

32 32 End Thank You for Your Attention CERIA Université Paris IX Dauphine


Download ppt "1 Interoperability of a Scalable Distributed Data Manager with an Object-relational DBMS Thesis presentation Yakham NDIAYE November, 13 the 2001 November,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google