Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

This presentation was held on a conference of the project „STEP“. The project „STEP“ has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "This presentation was held on a conference of the project „STEP“. The project „STEP“ has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication."— Presentation transcript:

1 This presentation was held on a conference of the project „STEP“. The project „STEP“ has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

2 ‘Systemic Ideas in Social Work: Toward Relational Practice’ Tracey Johnston, Senior Social Worker/Counsellor/Family Therapist in training & Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist InSyT (Scotland)

3 Plan Introductions. Aims. A celebration. What is InSyT? Importance of Systemic Practice Groups. What is Systemic? Time for the Gay Gordon’s. Questionnaire findings. Interview with a ‘systemic’ social worker. In what ways are questionnaire findings meaningful? Reflective discussion. Questions. Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist

4 What is InSyT? InSyT is the Institute of Systemic and Family Therapies (Scotland). It is consortium of systemic psychotherapists who provide: - training, -supervision, -consultation and -Therapy/intervention in systemic practice approaches including solution- focused, CBT, collaborative and narrative ways of practicing.

5 Peter W Robinson, Psychotherapist InSyT courses and events Long Courses: PQ Foundation PQ Certificate Systemic Practice Groups Local Workshops - Resilience and Recovery. National Workshops - Working with Multi-Problem families. Short Courses: - Systemic Skills in Social Work - Systemic Supervision in Social Work Systemic Supervision Groups - Systemic Practice in Child Protection. - The ‘Audacity of Hope’. - Supporting the Child in Placement. - Challenging Exclusion. - Practical Ideas for Effective Supervision. - Working with Self-harm. Possibilities: InSyT’s Clinical Arm Consultation Groups Multifamily groups - Systemic Practice in Adult Mental Health. - The Vulnerable Adult. - When Bullying Takes Its Grip. - Enhancing the Space-Between.

6 What is Systemic? Basic idea: People are connected in recursive relationships. What one person does has an effect on other people in the system as well as on relationships. Systemic practice is also about the relationship between our stories, ideas and beliefs and their impact on how we relate to one another and the potential possibilities we have in the world. Contexts give meaning. Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist

7 What is Systemic? The Gay Gordon’s

8 Systemic Practice Has changed in response to historical, political and cultural context changes. AMT. Systemic Practice is about people. Systemic Practice is relational. EG our relationship to the problem. Problem-determined systems. Systemic practice addresses issues of power and ethics : Social GRRAACCEES (Gender, race, religion, age, ability, class, culture, ethnicity, sexuality.) Systemic Practice is multi-contextual. CMM - From ‘contexts of failure to ‘contexts of competence’. - Creates contexts that bring forth ie clients strengths rather than sets forth. Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist

9 Systemic Practice Context From Latin/Middle English: ‘Contextus’ meaning woven/sewn together or connected. “Without context there is no meaning.” (Bateson) “Context is about the process of making connections and co-creating meanings.” (Hedges, 2005)

10 What is Systemic? Multiple Contexts and the Communication of Meaning -CMM: Co-ordinated Management of Meaning (Pearce & Cronen, 1991) Political, Cultural and Societal stories Neighbourhood stories Family stories Relationship stories Definition of relationship Self (gender) stories Episode stories: eg a fight Behaviour/Speech Act: ways of communicating. Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist

11 Systemic Practice Systemic practice is multi-positional (Harre, 2001) and about multiple perspectives and mutual influence. Systemic Practice fosters ‘cultures of contribution’. Systemic Practice is about creating contexts within which there are ‘possibilities’ for change. We believe that Systemic Practice helps social workers help their clients better.

12 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Post-Qualifying Foundation Courses in Systemic Practice and Family Therapy: Course content. Approaches Methods Techniques From systemic models: Strategic, Structural, Milan, Post-Milan, Solution-Focused and Narrative with a ‘systemic constructionist’ slant.

13 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Resources Problems Restraints Possibilities (Solutions) Systemic

14 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Post-Qualifying Foundation Courses in Systemic Practice and Family Therapy Course: 8 months Structure: Teaching Days Small ‘practice-based’ tutorial group Days

15 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Post-Qualifying Foundation Courses in Systemic Practice and Family Therapy: Course Evaluation Questionnaires Completed by Social Workers 53 Social Workers from all over Scotland, mainly Central belt. Level of experience: Range between 2 to 25 years as social workers. Most very experienced (in 6 to 14 years range). Most main grade. Mainly child and families social workers.

16 Q. To What extent has Systemic Practice Training improved your skills in: Creating and Maintaining a Collaborative Relationship with Clients? Number: 53 Social Workers 1 =Not At all 7 = a Great Deal. Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist, InSyT

17 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist At the end of the course, what are the most noticeable differences in your practice? “I feel that I think about cases differently.” “I feel relieved at not having to be the expert.” “I’m much more positive with clients.” I consider the wider context and various hypotheses.” “I’m always ‘panning for gold’ and remaining curious.”

18 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist At the end of the course, what are the most noticeable differences in your practice? “I’m much more confident and positive with clients. The course has changed my life.” “I’m more focused in my practice and more able to engage with my clients in a meaningful way.” “I have put down more solid foundations in the way I work.” “The systemic methods and techniques are very useful in my day to day work.”

19 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist, InSyT Q. To What extent has Systemic Practice Training improved your skills in: undertaking assessments? Number: 53 Social Workers 1 =Not At all 7 = a Great Deal.

20 Mapping the Client System: Relationships HV John Sally Paediatrician Police GP Refuge Social Worker Andrew Jane Foster Foster Parent Parent Matthew Sharon Peter Robinson Psychotherapist, InSyT – Institute of Systemic/Family Therapy (Scotland) Child Panel

21 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist At the end of the course, what are the most noticeable differences in your practice? “In my client work, I take more time to prepare and reflect.” “I have noticed that my work is more structured and this seems to help my clients focus more.” “I feel that I have more effective tools and techniques to use with clients.” “I feel more curious and freed-up.” “I have a better awareness of what I’m doing and why.”

22 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist, InSyT Q. To What extent has Systemic Practice Training improved your skills in: developing a better understanding of complex cases? Number: 53 Social Workers 1 =Not At all 7 = a Great Deal.

23 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist At the end of the course, what are the most noticeable differences in your practice? “I now have more confidence and enthusiasm for my work. The course has re- focussed me.” “I have more confidence to experiment and take risks together with service users.” “I have found my enthusiasm at work and become unstuck!” “I have changed the way I talk with service users. Its made a big difference.”

24 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist, InSyT Q. To What extent has Systemic Practice Training improved your skills in: effectively intervening in complex cases? Number: 53 Social Workers 1 =Not At all 7 = a Great Deal.

25 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist At the end of the course, what are the most noticeable differences in your practice? “I now have a more holistic and analytical way of working.” “Before I struggled to think in a systemic way but now I have the skills to work directly in a systemic manner, I love it!” “I take more time to reflect instead of rushing around and feeling useless.” “The course has inspired me. I try to use systemic tools at every opportunity.” “Both professionals and service users have received this approach positively.”

26 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist, InSyT Q. To What extent has Systemic Practice Training improved your skills in: effectively intervening in routine cases? Number: 53 Social Workers 1 =Not At all 7 = a Great Deal.

27 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist In Your View, Which Areas of Systemic Practice Training Most Improved Your Effectiveness as a Practitioner? In order of importance chosen by social workers: Locating problems in their wider systemic context. Genograms and transitions. Circular questioning. Reflecting practices and reflexivity. Reframing. Hypothesising. Structuring meetings. Adopting positions of curiosity. Externalising problems. Scaling questions. Use of safe/uncertainty. Eliciting clients strengths and hopes. Eliciting client feedback.

28 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Which Areas of Systemic Practice Training Most Improved Your Effectiveness as a Practitioner? Approaches Locating problems in their wider systemic context. Adopting positions of curiosity: use of safe/uncertainty. Reflexivity. Methods Reflecting practices Structuring meetings. Techniques Circular questioning. Genograms and transitions. Reframing. Hypothesising. Reflecting. Externalising problems. Scaling questions. Eliciting clients strengths and hopes. Eliciting client feedback.

29 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist What has Facilitated or Thwarted Your Use of Systemic Practice in your agency? “I have a lot of work to do and was given no extra time for study.” “In work, I don’t get any space to plan and reflect on my practice.” “There is little hope of changing the social work department!” “I’m going to move to a job where I’ll get more time to practice ‘systemic’ social work.” “I have gained more time for systemic practice by relinquishing my management role.”

30 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist What has Facilitated or Thwarted Your Use of Systemic Practice in your agency? “I plan to attend the monthly Systemic Practice Group to further develop my skills.” “My manager is very enthusiastic and interested in my new ideas.” “A number of my colleagues have completed the course including my senior who gives me lots of support.”

31 Scatterplot 6: Showing Strong Correlation between Improvement in Systemic Skills (S 5) and Improvement in General Case Management Skills (S 4)

32 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Questionnaire: Tentative Main Conclusions It appears that Systemic Practice may help social workers to: Become relational and more human. View their clients in multiple ways which opens up possibilities. To generally do their jobs better. Improve their confidence, self-esteem and job satisfaction by giving them tools that help them become more useful. Become less certain, less expert, more curious and; therefore, more effective. More research is required.

33 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Interview Tracey interview social worker regarding systemic practice now a few years after finishing the Foundation course.

34 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Exercise: in threes In what ways are these findings meaningful, if at all? From the positions of: Front-line social worker Social Work Manager. Social Work Client Each person to talk from one of the above positions to the others about the meaning of these findings and their fears and hopes.

35 Peter Robinson, Psychotherapist Resources Problems Restraints Possibilities (Solutions) Systemic Social Work


Download ppt "This presentation was held on a conference of the project „STEP“. The project „STEP“ has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google