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Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Surveillance and Broadcast Services Office ATO-E.

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Presentation on theme: "Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Surveillance and Broadcast Services Office ATO-E."— Presentation transcript:

1 Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Surveillance and Broadcast Services Office ATO-E

2 ADS-B 2 Federal Aviation Administration Who We Are The ADS-B program is represented by the Surveillance and Broadcast Services Office, established by the Joint Resource Council September 9, Program Manager- Vincent Capezzuto

3 ADS-B 3 Federal Aviation Administration Who We Are Vice President Of En Route and Oceanic Services- Rick Day En Route Surveillance and Broadcast Services Office- Vincent Capezzuto Office of the Administrator- Marion Blakey Chief Operating Officer- Russ Chew

4 ADS-B 4 Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependant Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) Description A utomatic –Periodically transmits information with no pilot or operator input required D ependent –Position and velocity vector are derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) or a Flight Management System (FMS) S urveillance –A method of determining position of aircraft, vehicles, or other assets B roadcast –Transmitted information available to anyone with the appropriate receiving equipment GPS Based ADS-B

5 ADS-B 5 Federal Aviation Administration ADS-B Description Full implementation of ADS-B capabilities requires –Aircraft avionics equipage (datalink radio and/or display capability) –Ground stations supporting datalink to aircraft –Integration into existing Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation systems (Micro EARTS, Common ARTS, STARS, ASDE-X, ERAM)

6 ADS-B 6 Federal Aviation Administration ADS-B Data-link Two ADS-B “links” or frequencies are approved by the FAA –Mode S “extended squitter” (1090 MHz) Used for most commercial aircraft –Universal Access Transceiver (UAT) (978 MHz) Typically used for other aircraft and vehicles Dual links may require a multilink or ADS- Rebroadcast (ADS-R) function to ensure 1090 and UAT users see each other 1090 UAT 1090

7 ADS-B 7 Federal Aviation Administration ADS-B message includes: –Heading –Altitude –Call sign –Speed –Distance –Aircraft category Aircraft CDTI Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) –Aircraft / vehicle “broadcasts” known GPS position and additional data –Radar like display for ADS-B traffic in aircraft cockpit or vehicle –Other capabilities include broadcast traffic information, terrain, and weather (via FIS-B and TIS-B services) Notional implementation of display

8 ADS-B 8 Federal Aviation Administration ADS-B Broadcast Services Traffic Information Service – Broadcast (TIS-B) TIS-B broadcasts surveillance data Flight Information Service – Broadcast (FIS-B) Graphical NEXRAD Weather, meteorological observations, and Terminal Area Forecasts (TAFs) broadcast from ground stations Early planned enhancements include graphical Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs) and additional graphical weather products * These services are advisory Radar Weather Aeronautical Information Control Facility *Notional physical architecture

9 ADS-B 9 Federal Aviation Administration Why deploy an ADS-B system? An ADS-B system provides the air/ground infrastructure upon which applications can be deployed when available to obtain additional benefits –Air-to-air applications –Other information services –Surveillance Information

10 ADS-B 10 Federal Aviation Administration Approach: Initial ADS-B Applications Application:Segment: Surveillance Broadcast Services (En Route, Terminal, Surface) Segment 1 & 2 Traffic / Flight Information Broadcast Services Segment 1 & 2 Enhanced Visual AcquisitionSegment 1 & 2 Enhanced Visual ApproachesSegment 1 & 2 Final Approach and Runway Occupancy Awareness Segment 1, 2 & 3 Airport Surface Situational AwarenessSegment 1, 2 & 3 Conflict DetectionSegment 1, 2 & 3 Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition – Segment 1, 2 & 3

11 ADS-B 11 Federal Aviation Administration Proposed Capabilities Air-to-Air Improved Separation Standards Improved Low-Visibility Approaches Enhanced See and Avoid Enhanced Operations for En Route Air-to-Air Ground-to-Ground Improved Navigation on Taxiways Enhanced Controller Management of Surface Traffic Ground-to-Air & Self-Contained Weather and SSR Traffic to the Cockpit Affordable Reduction of Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) Air-to-Ground Surveillance Coverage in Radar / Non-Radar Airspace

12 ADS-B 12 Federal Aviation Administration General Rulemaking Process RPR Process* OPR identifies need for rulemaking OPR prepares Phase I RPR Council approves Phase I RPR NPRM Process* 2 Weeks Rulemaking team drafts NPRM Economist draft economic evaluation Final team concurrenc e Internal FAA coordination Significant? Federal Register publishes NPRM OST Review and OMB Review 1-3 Months Final Rule Process** Comment period closes Rulemaking team disposes of comments Rulemaking team prepares Phase III RPR Rulemaking team drafts final rule Council approves Phase III RPR Economist prepares Regulatory Evaluation Final team concurrenc e Internal FAA coordination Significant? OST Review and OMB Review Federal Register publishes final rule End Yes No 8-12 Months 6 Months 2 Weeks RPR team prepares Phase II RPR Council approves Phase II RPR Expedited Approach 90 Day Comment Period **Source: FAA Office of Rulemaking Quality Management System Rulemaking Manual; Average timeframes provided, actual timeframes depend on size and complexity of project 120 Days 45 Days 40 Days 45 Days 120 Days 15 Days Meets every 6 weeks *Estimated durations and diagram provided by AVS/Mitre Subtotal = 18 – 24.5 Months Subtotal = 16 Months Total = 34 Months – 40.5 Months Weeks

13 ADS-B 13 Federal Aviation Administration Approach: ADS-B Program Segments Segment 1Segment 2Segment 3Segment 4 Targeted ADS-B Infrastructure Deployment ADS-B “Out” Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Issued Begin Avionics Equipage Complete ADS-B NAS Wide Infrastructure Deployment ADS-B “Out” Final Rule Published Continue Avionics Equipage Complete Avionics Equipage Targeted Removal of Legacy Surveillance Complete Removal of Targeted Legacy Surveillance Expand TIS-B / FIS-B Infrastructure Complete TIS-B / FIS-B Deployment TIS-B Removal Begin Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Continue Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Complete Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Complete Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment

14 Federal Aviation Administration Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Stakeholders Meeting

15 ADS-B 15 Federal Aviation Administration Agenda Program Status Objective Approach Products Schedule Summary Issues Discussion Points Action Items

16 ADS-B 16 Federal Aviation Administration Program Status Office of the Administrator (AOA) / Office of the Deputy Administrator (ADA) –February 1, 2006 –February 6, 2006 –February 21, 2006 JRC on February 10, 2006 Executive Council –December 20, 2005 –January 18, 2006 (post OPS Daily Brief) –January 31, 2006 Aviation Safety (AVS) Strategy Meeting –January 6, 2006 –January 18, 2006 ATO-S –Independent Operational Test & Evaluation Office (IOT&E) on January 27, 2006 –Safety Management on February 16, 2006 Office of Airports (ARP) Strategy Meeting on January 17, 2006 ATO-P Transition Discussion on January 20, 2006 Capstone-Juneau Discussions –January 19, 2006 –February 10, 2006 –February 17, 2006

17 ADS-B 17 Federal Aviation Administration Program Status (Continued) Office of Chief Counsel - Acquisition & Hearing Branch ( AGC-500) on January 18, 2006 Office of Public Affairs on January 19, 2006 Mitre Corporation Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD) –January 12, 2006 –February 3, 2006 Air Traffic Management (ATM) Steering Group on January 20, 2006 RTCA Government / Industry Initial ADS-B Implementation Strategy Group –January 31, 2006 –February 6, 2006 –February 8, 2006 –February 17, 2006 Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) –January 26, 2006 –February 3, 2006 –February 13, 2006 Department of Defense (DoD) on February 15, 2006 Government Accountability Office (GAO) on January 23, 2006 Air Transport Association (ATA) on January 18, 2006 Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) on January 19, 2006 Helicopter Association International (HAI) on February 10, 2006

18 ADS-B 18 Federal Aviation Administration Program Status (Continued) Industry Meetings –ITT Industries on February 15, 2006 –Northrop Grumman on February 14, 2006 –Sensis on February 9, 2006 –Rannoch on February 7, 2006 –Aviation Communication & Surveillance Systems (ACSS) on February 22, 2006 Established Recurring Meetings –Risk Board –Benefits –Investment Analysis –Schedule Review –JPDO Roadmap

19 ADS-B 19 Federal Aviation Administration Objective Develop a multi-segment, life cycle managed, performance based ADS-B strategy that aligns with the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) vision and generates value for the National Airspace System (NAS) –Integrate Concept of Operations for Portfolio of ADS-B Applications –Develop Application Life Cycle Management Approach Portfolio Management for Applications Requirements Management Across the Applications Performance Criteria Management –Establish Infrastructure –Continuously Monitor Value and Adjust Investments

20 ADS-B 20 Federal Aviation Administration Approach: Initial ADS-B Applications Application:Segment: Surveillance Broadcast Services (En Route, Terminal, Surface) Segment 1 & 2 Traffic / Flight Information Broadcast Services Segment 1 & 2 Enhanced Visual AcquisitionSegment 1 & 2 Enhanced Visual ApproachesSegment 1 & 2 Final Approach and Runway Occupancy Awareness Segment 1, 2 & 3 Airport Surface Situational AwarenessSegment 1, 2 & 3 Conflict DetectionSegment 1, 2 & 3 Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition – Segment 1, 2 & 3

21 ADS-B 21 Federal Aviation Administration Approach: ADS-B Program Segments Segment 1Segment 2Segment 3Segment 4 Targeted ADS-B Infrastructure Deployment ADS-B “Out” Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Issued Begin Avionics Equipage Complete ADS-B NAS Wide Infrastructure Deployment ADS-B “Out” Final Rule Published Continue Avionics Equipage Complete Avionics Equipage Targeted Removal of Legacy Surveillance Complete Removal of Targeted Legacy Surveillance Expand TIS-B / FIS-B Infrastructure Complete TIS-B / FIS-B Deployment TIS-B Removal Begin Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Continue Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Complete Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment Complete Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment

22 ADS-B 22 Federal Aviation Administration Products: Segment 1 Program Charter Program Management Plan (PMP) Integrated Concept of Operations (CONOPS) Requirements Mapped to Applications Safety Assessment Consistent with Safety Management System (SMS) Business Case for Limited Surveillance and Traffic / Flight Information Broadcast Services Deployment (June 2006) –OMB Exhibit-300 (Includes Attachments 1 and 2: Business Case Analysis Report and Program Requirements) –Benefits Model –Cost Model –Economic Analysis Business Case for Segment 2 (February 2007) Deploy and Certify Equipment to Support Service Delivery in Selected Locations Certification of ADS-B Based Separation Standards for 3 and 5 Miles ADS-B “Out” Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

23 ADS-B 23 Federal Aviation Administration JRC-2B Schedule: Investment Analysis

24 ADS-B 24 Federal Aviation Administration Proposed Schedule: Segments 1, 2, 3, 4 Segment 1 (2007 – 2010): –Begin Avionics Equipage:FY 2007 –Expand TIS-B / FIS-B Infrastructure: FY 2007 – FY 2010 –Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition:FY 2007 – FY 2010 –ADS-B “Out” Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) Issued:FY 2008 –Begin Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment:FY 2008 –Targeted ADS-B Infrastructure Deployment:FY 2010 Segment 2 (2010 – 2014): –ADS-B “Out” Final Rule Published:FY 2010 –Continue Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment: FY 2010 – FY 2014 –Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment:FY 2010 – FY 2014 –Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition:FY 2010 – FY 2014 –Complete TIS-B / FIS-B Deployment:FY 2012 –Complete ADS-B NAS Wide Infrastructure Deployment:FY 2013 –Complete 40% Avionics:FY 2014 Segment 3 (2015 – 2020): –Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Requirements Definition:FY 2015 – FY 2020 –Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment:FY 2015 – FY 2020 –Targeted Removal of Legacy Surveillance:FY 2018 – FY 2020 –Complete 100% Avionics:FY 2020 –Complete Initial Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment:FY 2020 Segment 4 (2021 – 2025): –Complete Removal of Targeted Legacy Surveillance:FY 2023 –TIS-B Removal:FY 2025 –Complete Additional Aircraft to Aircraft Application Deployment:FY 2025

25 ADS-B 25 Federal Aviation Administration Summary: Segment 1 Integrate Concept of Operations and Requirements for ADS-B Establish Cost, Schedule and Technical Performance Segment 1 Baseline Deploy / Upgrade systems at targeted locations Provide operational NAS-wide Air Traffic Control (ATC) services Confirm minimum avionics performance to ensure future utility Prepare documentation to support ADS-B “Out” rulemaking notice (NPRM) Finalize architecture for ADS-B including backup strategy Additional aircraft to aircraft requirements definition

26 ADS-B 26 Federal Aviation Administration Summary (Continued) Combines risk mitigation activities with opportunity to achieve near-term benefits Establishes high priority rulemaking team Represents collaborative FAA / industry effort Achieves balanced customer – owner – employee approach

27 ADS-B 27 Federal Aviation Administration Program Issues ADS-B “Out” Mandate Strategy –User acceptance critical to success ADS-B Back-up Strategy Requires Refinement –GPS availability interdependencies affects airborne navigation and surveillance –Existing primary and / or secondary surveillance Operational Air Traffic –Separation Standards –ATC Display Ability of Users to Remove Selected Legacy Avionics with Full ADS-B Implementation Effects of 1090 Mhz Uplink Saturation in High Density Airspace

28 ADS-B 28 Federal Aviation Administration Discussion Points Research & Development (R&D) Transition Criteria To Service Units –Capstone Program Seeking In-Service Decision (ISD) –System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) scheduled for JRC Communications –Coordinated FAA Program Office International CONUS / Alaska / Hawaii Department of Defense (DoD) Personnel Acquisition –AVS –ATO-E AVS-1 Letter

29 ADS-B 29 Federal Aviation Administration Provide ADS-B Program Charter for Signature to the Executive Council Signature of Rulemaking Project Record, Phase I –Signatories: Vice President, AJE-0 – Rick Day Director, AIR-1 – John Hickey Director, AFS-1 – Jim Ballough Chief Operating Officer, AJO-0 – Russ Chew Associate Administrator, AVS-1 – Nick Sabatini Chief Counsel, AGC-1 – Andy Steinberg Action Items

30 ADS-B 30 Federal Aviation Administration Backup

31 ADS-B 31 Federal Aviation Administration General Rulemaking Process RPR Process* OPR identifies need for rulemaking OPR prepares Phase I RPR Council approves Phase I RPR NPRM Process* 2 Weeks Rulemaking team drafts NPRM Economist draft economic evaluation Final team concurrenc e Internal FAA coordination Significant? Federal Register publishes NPRM OST Review and OMB Review 1-3 Months Final Rule Process** Comment period closes Rulemaking team disposes of comments Rulemaking team prepares Phase III RPR Rulemaking team drafts final rule Council approves Phase III RPR Economist prepares Regulatory Evaluation Final team concurrenc e Internal FAA coordination Significant? OST Review and OMB Review Federal Register publishes final rule End Yes No 8-12 Months 6 Months 2 Weeks RPR team prepares Phase II RPR Council approves Phase II RPR Expedited Approach 90 Day Comment Period **Source: FAA Office of Rulemaking Quality Management System Rulemaking Manual; Average timeframes provided, actual timeframes depend on size and complexity of project 120 Days 45 Days 40 Days 45 Days 120 Days 15 Days Meets every 6 weeks *Estimated durations and diagram provided by AVS/Mitre Subtotal = 18 – 24.5 Months Subtotal = 16 Months Total = 34 Months – 40.5 Months Weeks

32 ADS-B 32 Federal Aviation Administration Rulemaking Management Council The Core Council members are: –The Director of the Office of Rulemaking, who is the Council chair –A representative from the Office of the Chief Counsel’s (AGC) Regulation Division –A representative from the Office of Aviation Policy and Plans’ (APO) Regulatory Analysis Division –The Office of Rulemaking Division Managers The Council meets about six times each year. The Council’s meeting calendar is available in CyberDocs No

33 ADS-B 33 Federal Aviation Administration Resources: Functional Disciplines Systems Engineering Communications Aircraft Certification and Operations Implementation ADS-B Program Manager Admin Financial ContractsOps Support SE Process planning Requirements analysis Functional analysis/allocation Design Synthesis Tech Refresh Test & Evaluation System Control Configuration Management Data Management Technical reviews & audits Quality Control Interface Management Modeling & Simulation Performance Metrics System Analysis Trade Studies Risk Management Specialty Engineering Security Safety Human Factors Research OMB 300 EVM PR’s Travel budget Spend Plans Timecards Schedule Correspondence Supplies Travel Services Internal Public Affairs Briefing support External Govt & Industry Acq. Planning Obtain info Source selection Contract Admin. Contract Review Industry Interface Dispute Resolution Rulemaking Policy Avionic Standards Rulemaking Legal Policy and Guidance Certification Operational Evaluation Flight crew workload Infrastructure Avionics Equipage Operational Approval Continued Airworthiness Site Design Site Acquisition Site Prep Installation Joint Acceptance A/C Avionics Legal NAILS Material Mgmt Training Development Logistics External DoD/DHS ICAO JPDO RTCA Foreign Regulatory Agencies State Dept Stakeholder Interface Internal ATO AVS CAPSTONE WAAS/LAAS Surveillance Safety SMS Integrator Safety Risk Management (SRM) SRMD SRMDM SRM Panel coordination Hazard Control/Mitigation coordination Coordinate with Safety Manager Respond to Audit request IOT&E ATC AF Flight Crew Design/ Production Integrator of Cost, Schedule, and Technical performance Avionics Ground Infrastructure Interoperability Cert. Standards Integration Ops Procedures Production Test

34 ADS-B 34 Federal Aviation Administration JRC-2A: Economic Analysis (Risk-Adjusted Results)

35 ADS-B 35 Federal Aviation Administration JRC-2A: Total Costs: (Point Estimate)

36 ADS-B 36 Federal Aviation Administration JRC-2A: Total Benefits (Point Estimate)


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