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Prof Cynthia Tenaglia William Blake William Blake ( 1757-1827) A poets A painter An engraver A visionary Prof Cynthia Tenaglia.

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Presentation on theme: "Prof Cynthia Tenaglia William Blake William Blake ( 1757-1827) A poets A painter An engraver A visionary Prof Cynthia Tenaglia."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia William Blake William Blake ( ) A poets A painter An engraver A visionary Prof Cynthia Tenaglia

2 The Poet Regarded as early Romantic : rejected classical themes rejected classical themes stressed the importance of imagination over reason stressed the importance of imagination over reason believed that ideal forms should be created not from observation of nature, but from an inner vision believed that ideal forms should be created not from observation of nature, but from an inner vision

3 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia He broke with all the conventions and created a new kind of art which emphasized the power of imagination: a particular process of printing probably influenced by medieval illuminating manuscript the test was often surrounded by imaginary figures that provided decorations, but also an imaginative interpretation of the text itself. a unique work of art, too expensive and hard to reproduce Engraved on copperplate, printed and then water-coloured

4 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia

5 Francesco De Gregori - L'Agnello Di Dio

6 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia INNOCENCE A pastoral symbolism drawn from the Bible A pastoral symbolism drawn from the Bible A state of soul connected with: A state of soul connected with: purity purity happiness happiness freedom freedom childhood represents: not an age but a state of the soul a childlike view of life people who still feel close to their divine origin.

7 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia INTRODUCTION Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: "Pipe a song about a Lamb!" So I piped with merry chear. "Piper, pipe that song again" So I piped, he wept to hear. …………… And I made a rural pen, And I stain'd the water clear, And I wrote my happy songs Every child may joy to hear

8 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia WHO IS THE NARRATOR? The narrator is a shepherd who receives inspiration from a child in a cloud to pipe his songs celebrating the divine creation. The narrator is a shepherd who receives inspiration from a child in a cloud to pipe his songs celebrating the divine creation. The language is simple and musical The language is simple and musical

9 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Look at this video: Auguries of innocence... Auguries of innocence... Auguries of innocence... What feelings do you get ? What feelings do you get ? Harmony Harmony Tranquillity Tranquillity Serenity Serenity Infinity Infinity Eternity Eternity “death is only a removal from one room to another” “death is only a removal from one room to another”

10 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Auguries of Innocence To see a World in a grain of sand, And a Heaven in a wild flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand, And Eternity in an hour.

11 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Look at the video WILLIAM BLAKE WILLIAM Anxiety Anxiety Anguish Anguish Terror TerrorFearPowerSorrow

12 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia EXPERIENCE

13 A visionary poet Far from being hallucinations caused by mental disorder Far from being hallucinations caused by mental disorder He believed in the illuminating power of his visions He believed in the illuminating power of his visions The triumph of imagination against reason The triumph of imagination against reason He always followed the truth he felt in himself He always followed the truth he felt in himself Imagination and the sensations of his heart were his only guides Imagination and the sensations of his heart were his only guides “He who sees the Infinite in all things sees God. He who sees the Ratio sees himself only.” “He who sees the Infinite in all things sees God. He who sees the Ratio sees himself only.”

14 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Who is God?

15 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia God is the creative and spiritual power in man God is IMAGINATION Imagination is The Divine Power, the power of creating things. He denied the existence of God separated from man. Did he who made the Lamb make the Tyger?

16 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia The two states of the soul coexist also in GOD, in the figure of the Creator. He can be at the same time: He can be at the same time: the God of love and innocence the God of love and innocence the God of energy and violence the God of energy and violence

17 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Every living thing was a symbol of the everlasting power He tried to discover the reality beyond the visible world He described the invisible in the language of the visible it was possible only through similes and metaphors, from here his symbolism

18 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia The poet is a PROPHET His task is to awaken his generation to the well organized world of imagination The poet is a link between man and nature, and the Divine

19 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia END OF THE NIGHT THE DOORS Take the highway to the end of the night End of the night End of the night Take a journey to the bright midnight End of the night End of the night Realms of bliss Realms of light Some are born to sweet delight Some are born to sweet delight Some are born to the endless night End of the night End of the night End of the night End of the night End of the night Realms of bliss Realms of light Some are born to sweet delight Some are born to sweet delight Some are born to the endless night End of the night End of the night End of the night End of the night

20 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Blake’s Influence Jim Morrison Jim Morrison got the name for The Doors from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell “If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is—infinite. For man has closed himself up till he sees things through narrow chinks of his cavern.”

21 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia INNOCENCE EXPERIENCE

22 “Complementary opposites” without contraries there’s no progression ; in order to develop his vital energies he must know not only joy, but sorrow too Man must be tested by experience ; in order to develop his vital energies he must know not only joy, but sorrow too Good and Evil ; Love and hate …. are necessary to human existence. All of them exist in an eternal opposition and together they represent the plenitude of man’s life

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24 Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Gave thee life & bid thee feed, By the stream & o'er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, wooly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice? Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Little Lamb, I'll tell thee, Little Lamb, I'll tell thee: He is called by thy name, For he calls himself a Lamb. He is meek & he is mild; He became a little child. I a child & thou a lamb. We are called by his name. Little Lamb, God bless thee! Little Lamb, God bless thee! Questions Answer Rhyming couplets

25 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Gave thee life & bid thee feed, By the stream & o'er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, wooly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Little Lamb, I'll tell thee, Little Lamb, I'll tell thee: He is called by thy name, For he calls himself a Lamb. He is meek & he is mild; He became a little child. I a child & thou a lamb. We are called by his name. Little Lamb, God bless thee! Refrain The Rhythm is slow and meditative

26 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Gave thee life & bid thee feed, By the stream & o'er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, wooly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice? Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Long vowels They convey an image of tenderness, purity and peace

27 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Gave thee life & bid thee feed, By the stream & o'er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, wooly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice? Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee?

28 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? Gave thee life & bid thee feed, By the stream & o'er the mead; Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, wooly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice, Making all the vales rejoice? Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee?

29 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, I'll tell thee, Little Lamb, I'll tell thee: He is called by thy name, For he calls himself a Lamb. He is meek & he is mild; He became a little child. I a child & thou a lamb. We are called by his name. Little Lamb, God bless thee! Little Lamb, God bless thee!

30 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Little Lamb, I'll tell thee, Little Lamb, I'll tell thee: He is called by thy name, For he calls himself a Lamb. He is meek & he is mild; He became a little child. I a child & thou a lamb. We are called by his name. Little Lamb, God bless thee! Little Lamb, God bless thee! Identification of the poet with the child Childhood a state of the soul Poet = a prophet

31 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia The Tyger Tangerine Dream : Tyger Tangerine Dream : Tyger Jah Wobble :The inspiration of Blake Tyger. Tyger ! Tyger! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? And what shoulder, and what art, Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? And what dread feet?

32 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia What the hammer? What the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? What dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors grasp? When the stars threw down their spears, And water’d heaven with their tears Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

33 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Tyger ! Tyger ! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? And what shoulder, and what art, Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? And what dread feet? How does the poet address the tyger ?

34 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Tyger ! Tyger ! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry ? How is the tyger like? violence shining Symbol of experience, suffering and violence

35 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Tyger ! Tyger ! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry ? How is the tyger like? The light of genius overcoming ignorance

36 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia What about the setting? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? The poet emphasizes the distance between man and God A link with the first stanza A metaphor of strenght

37 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? Metaphor of the Creator’s / artist’s capacity to rise above the material world The myth of Icarus

38 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia We should be terrified by the tyger and by God, but at the same time we feel admiration for their strenght And what shoulder, and what art, Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? And what dread feet? What the hammer? What the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? What dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors grasp?

39 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia

40 Here there is a clear reference to the Here there is a clear reference to the biblical fall of the angels when they revolted against God. Reason revolted against Imagination When the stars threw down their spears, And water’d heaven with their tears Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? They fought against God They surrended afraid of the power and punishment of God

41 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia What’s the final answer? Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Impossible to understand through reason

42 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Romantic aspect of his poetry: concept of imagination contemplation of nature interest in the medieval and gothic exaltation of art ( in this he anticipates the aesthetic movement ) art seen as a creative vision freedom: he lived all the contradictions of his time. Like Rousseau he believed that “ Man is born free and everywhere he is in chains”, so he hailed the American and French revolution. He rebelled against any form of oppression: social, political and religious. He attacked the values of the 18th c. in favour of democracy and justice

43 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia LET’S ANALYZE “ THE CHIMNEY SWEEPER When my mother died I was very young, And my father sold me while yet my tongue Could scarcely cry " 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!“ So your chimneys I sweep & in soot I sleep. There's little Tom Dacre, who cried when his head, That curl'd like a lamb's back. was shav'd: so I said "Hush. Tom! never mind it, for when your head's bare You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair.“

44 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia And so he was quiet & that very night, As Tom was a-sleeping, he had such a sight! That thousands of sweepers, Dick, Joe, Ned or Jack. Were all of them lock'd up in coffins of black. And by came an Angel who had a bright key, And he open'd the coffins & set them all free; Then down a green plain leaping, laughing, they run, And wash in a river. and shine in the Sun.

45 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia Then naked & white, all their bags left behind, They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind; And the Angel told Tom, if he'd be a good boy, He'd have God for his father & never want joy. And so Tom awoke; and we rose in the dark. And got with our bags & our brushes to work. Tho' the morning was cold, Tom was happy & warm; So if all do their duty they need not fear harm.

46 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia WHAT DO THEY BELONG TO?

47 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia THE CHIMNEY SWEEPER A little black thing among the snow: Crying weep, weep, in notes of woe! Where are thy father & mother! say! They are both gone up to the church to pray. A little black thing among the snow: Crying weep, weep, in notes of woe! Where are thy father & mother! say! They are both gone up to the church to pray. Because I was happy upon the heath, And smil'd among the winters snow: They clothed me in the clothes of death, And taught me to sing the notes of woe. Because I was happy upon the heath, And smil'd among the winters snow: They clothed me in the clothes of death, And taught me to sing the notes of woe. And because I am happy, & dance & sing, They think they have done me no injury: And are gone to praise God & his Priest & King Who make up a heaven of our misery. And because I am happy, & dance & sing, They think they have done me no injury: And are gone to praise God & his Priest & King Who make up a heaven of our misery.

48 Prof Cynthia Tenaglia London by William Blake I wander thro ’ each charter ’ d street, Near where the charter ’ d Thames does flow, And mark in every face I meet Marks of weakness, marks of woe. In every cry of every Man, In every Infant ’ s cry of fear, In every voice, in every ban, The mind-forg ’ d manacles I hear. How the Chimney-sweeper ’ s cry Every black'ning Church appalls; And the hapless Soldier ’ s sigh Runs in blood down Palace walls. But most thro ’ midnight streets I hear How the youthful Harlot ’ s curse Blasts the new-born Infant ’ s tear And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse.


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