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“The Tyger” by William Blake. THE TYGER (from Songs Of Experience) By William Blake Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal.

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Presentation on theme: "“The Tyger” by William Blake. THE TYGER (from Songs Of Experience) By William Blake Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal."— Presentation transcript:

1 “The Tyger” by William Blake

2 THE TYGER (from Songs Of Experience) By William Blake Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? And what shoulder, & what art. Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? & what dread feet? What the hammer? what the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? what dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp? When the stars threw down their spears, And watered heaven with their tears, Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

3 What does the spelling of “tyger” suggest? It is an unfamiliar spelling which suggests the exotic or alien quality of the beast. What effect does the alliteration have? Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, There is contrast in the two opening lines – can you identify it? The darkness of the forest (which also suggests an unknown and hostile place) is contrasted with the intense “burning” brightness of the tiger’s colouring.

4 The speaker is asking the fearful tiger what kind of divine being could have created it –is there an answer? What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? Remember that Blake is not asking who created this creature, but what. Why do you think he does this? We are challenged to imagine something or someone so powerful as to be able to make this animal. What does this suggest to us about the tiger? Symmetry – noun. Two halves that are mirror images of each other that often results in beauty.

5 Again the poet introduces the idea of fire and burning which he associates with the tiger. He is also suggesting that the tiger has been created in a distant place that only wings can reach. In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? Can you think where he may be referring to? Aspire – verb. To try and achieve or reach something difficult; ambitious. Seize – verb. To overcome or take something by force.

6 Strength/burden Responsibility, power and strength of the creator Knowledge And what shoulder, & what art. Could twist the sinews of thy heart? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? & what dread feet? Tendons, veins, arteries of the heart To create such a creature one must be extraordinary in both these things.

7 The words here relate to industry. Blake may have seen the industrial revolution as the tyger. Within this poem he appears to be referring to strength of this revolution. What the hammer? what the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? what dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp? Words relate to Ironmonger- tools There is a metaphor in these lines -find it. The rhythm suggests the banging of a blacksmith’s tools

8 When the stars threw down their spears, And watered heaven with their tears, Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? Was he pleased with his work? Think about line 4 in this verse. What words would you use to describe a lamb? There is contrast here between the tiger and the lamb. There is also awe at a being that could create something as terrifying as the tiger could also create the lamb. There also exists an element of religion here as Christ is also known as the Lamb of God.

9 Blake marvels at a world containing both beauty and horror within one creature. Repetition to reinforce ideas Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Suggests courage. He must have some courage to dare to create this tyger. It is beautiful yet destructive. We are left in awe at this complex creature.

10 Rhetorical questions How many rhetorical questions are there in the poem? Why do you think the poet has used rhetorical devices (the use of a series of rhetorical questions) in his poem? What effect do they have?

11 Putting it all together: 1. What is the poem about? Tell me a little bit about the poem in one or two sentences (How do you know this?) 2. Who is speaking in the poem and who is the poet speaking to? 3. How does the poem convey its message? Think about: verses, imagery, diction, rhythm, mood, etc. 4. Imagine you are William Blake and tell me why you have written this poem. 5. What is YOUR Personal response to the poem? Do you think the poem is effective? Why?


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