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Winston Churchill — His Other Life Unit 1 : Text A 21st Century College English: Book 2.

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Presentation on theme: "Winston Churchill — His Other Life Unit 1 : Text A 21st Century College English: Book 2."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Winston Churchill — His Other Life Unit 1 : Text A 21st Century College English: Book 2

3 Unit 1: Text A Lead-in Activities Lead-in ActivitiesLead-in ActivitiesLead-in Activities Text Organization Text OrganizationText OrganizationText Organization Reading & Writing Skills Reading & Writing SkillsReading & Writing SkillsReading & Writing Skills Language Points Language PointsLanguage PointsLanguage Points Guided Practice Guided PracticeGuided PracticeGuided Practice Assignment AssignmentAssignment

4 Lead-in Activities 1.Who was Winston Churchill? 1.Who was Winston Churchill? Do you know something about him? 2.What is it that makes someone great? Warm-up Questions

5 Churchill began his love affair with painting amid disastrous circumstances. The process of Churchill’s learning painting, which showed his gift for painting. It was painting that rescued him when the deaths of his mother and 3 - year-old daughter gave him another great grief. Churchill’s great success in painting. Conclusion: Painting brought joy, peace, and hope to Churchill. para. 1-3 para. 4-8 para para para. 13 Text Organization

6 1.Major event and then briefly outline what led up to it or how it happened 1.Major event and then briefly outline what led up to it or how it happened. 2.Figurative language is a special type of comparison. Personification attributes human qualities and abilities to inanimate objects, animals, abstractions, and events. When we refer to China as “mother country”, we use personification as comparison model. In text A, the author compares “canvas” to “victim”. More examples: More examples: The racing car strained impatiently at the starting line. The racing car strained impatiently at the starting line. King of the jungle, the lion strode across the plain. King of the jungle, the lion strode across the plain. Reading & Writing Skills

7 Winston Churchill — His Other Life by Mary Soames Text A: Intensive Study

8 Winston Churchill — His Other Life Winston Churchill — His Other Life by Mary Soames 1 My father, Winston Churchill, began his love affair with painting in his 40s, amid disastrous circumstances. As First Lord of the Admiralty in 1915, he had been deeply involved in a campaign in the Dardanelles that could have shortened the course of a bloody world war. But when the mission failed, with great loss of life, Churchill paid the price, both publicly and privately: He was removed from the Admiralty and lost his position of political influence. Winston Churchilllove affaircircumstancesDardanellesbloody world warmissionpaid the priceWinston Churchilllove affaircircumstancesDardanellesbloody world warmissionpaid the price Intensive Study

9 2 Overwhelmed by the disaster – “I thought he would die of grief,”said his wife, Clementine – he retired with his family to Hoe Farm, a country retreat in Surrey. There, as Churchill later recalled, “The muse of painting came to my rescue!” Overwhelmedretreatcame to my rescueOverwhelmedretreatcame to my rescue 3 One day when he was wandering in the garden, he chanced upon his sister-in-law sketching with watercolors. He watched her for a few minutes, then borrowed her brush and tried his hand – and the muse worked her magic. From that day forward, Winston was in love with painting. chanced upontried his handchanced upontried his hand Intensive Study

10 4 Delighted with anything that distracted Winston from the dark thoughts that overwhelmed him, Clementine rushed off to buy whatever paints and materials she could find. Watercolours, oil paints, paper, canvas — Hoe Farm was soon filled with everything a painter could want or need. 5 Painting in oils turned out to be Winston's great love – but the first steps were strangely difficult. He contemplated the blank whiteness of his first canvas with unaccustomed nervousness. He later recalled: contemplated Intensive Study

11 6 “Very hesitantly I selected a tube of blue paint, and with infinite precaution made a mark about as big as a bean on the snow-white field. At that moment I heard the sound of a motorcar in the drive and threw down my brush in a panic. I was even more alarmed when I saw who stepped from the car: the wife of Sir John Lavery, the celebrated painter who lived nearby. Intensive Study

12 7 “'Painting!' she declared. 'What fun. But what are you waiting for? Let me have the brush — the big one.' She plunged into the paints and before I knew it, she had swept several fierce strokes and slashes of blue on the absolutely terrified canvas. Anyone could see it could not hit back. I hesitated no more. I seized the largest brush and fell upon my wretched victim with wild fury. I have never felt any fear of a canvas since.” plunged intobefore I knew itfell uponplunged intobefore I knew itfell upon Intensive Study

13 8 Lavery, who later tutored Churchill in his art, said of his unusual pupil's artistic abilities: “Had he chosen painting instead of politics, he would have been a great master with the brush.” Intensive Study

14 9 In painting, Churchill had discovered a companion with whom he was to walk for the greater part of his life. Painting would be his comfort when, in 1921, the death of his mother was followed two months later by the loss of his and Clementine's beloved three- year-old daughter, Marigold. Overcome by grief, Winston took refuge at the home of friends in Scotland — and in his painting. He wrote to Clementine:“I went out and painted a beautiful river in the afternoon light with red and golden hills in the background. Many loving thoughts... Alas, I keep feeling the hurt of Marigold.” comfortOvercometook refuge comfortOvercometook refuge Intensive Study

15 10 Life and love and hope slowly revived. In September 1922 another child was born to Clementine and Winston: myself. In the same year, Winston bought Chartwell, the beloved home he was to paint in all its different aspects for the next 40 years. Intensive Study

16 11 My father must have felt a glow of satisfaction when in the mid-1920s he won first prize in a prestigious amateur art exhibition held in London. Entries were anonymous, and some of the judges insisted that Winston's picture — one of his first of Chartwell — was the work of a professional, not an amateur, and should be disqualified. But in the end, they agreed to rely on the artist's honesty and were delighted when they learned that the picture had been painted by Churchill. Entries Intensive Study

17 12 Historians have called the decade after 1929, when Winston again fell from office, his barren years. Politically barren they may have been, as his lonely voice struggled to awaken Britain to the menace of Hitler, but artistically those years bore abundant fruit: of the 500-odd Churchill canvases in existence, roughly half date from 1930 to odd Intensive Study

18 13 Painting remained a joy to Churchill to the end of his life. “Happy are the painters,” he had written in his book Painting as a Pastime, “for they shall not be lonely. Light and colour, peace and hope, will keep them company to the end of the day.” And so it was for my father. keep them companyAnd so it was for my fatherkeep them companyAnd so it was for my father (776 Words) Intensive Study

19 Winston Churchill W inston Churchill, a British Conservative statesman, orator, and writer, was noted for his leadership during World War II. He held various posts under both Conservative and Liberal governments, including First Lord of the Admiralty ( , ), and Chancellor of the Exchequer ( ) before becoming Prime Minister ( , ). His writings include The World Crisis ( ), The Second World War ( ), and A History of the English-Speaking Peoples ( ). He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in Text-related Information

20 love affair — romance between two people who love each other but who are not married to each other; great enthusiasm or liking (for sth.) e.g. The girl’s love affair with the 60-year-old man worries her parents..The girl’s love affair with the 60-year-old man worries her parents.. She started her love affair with ballet when she was only six.She started her love affair with ballet when she was only six.

21 circumstances n. (pl.) —conditions of a situation which has an effect on what is done or on the way sth. is done e.g. In some circumstances it may be necessary for the manager to come here in person. In some circumstances it may be necessary for the manager to come here in person. Even under the most favourable circumstances this is not easy. Even under the most favourable circumstances this is not easy.

22 The Dardanelles Campaign I t lasted from Feb to Jan. 1916, and was a concerted military campaign against Turkey waged by Britain and France. The campaign, which had been expected to be a risky yet promising one, ended in the arduous retreat of British forces with a casualty of 213,980 men and heavy loss and damage to warships. The losing campaign led to Winston Churchill’s removal from the Admiralty. The Dardanelles is the strait between the Aegean and the Sea of Marmara, separating European from Asian Turkey. Text-related Information

23 a bloody world war It refers to World War I (1914 — 1918). The war was fought mainly in Europe and the Middle East, in which the Allies — mainly France, Russia, Britain, Italy and the US defeated the Central Powers — principally Germany, Austria-Hungary and Turkey. Text-related Information

24 mission n. — an important job sb. is sent to do in another place, esp. for a military or political purpose e.g. The foreign minister’s mission to Paris is to negotiate a cease-fire. The foreign minister’s mission to Paris is to negotiate a cease-fire. It is his sole mission to expand the company’s business abroad.It is his sole mission to expand the company’s business abroad.

25 price n. — what must be given, done, or undergone to obtain or compensate for sth. e.g. We paid a heavy price for the victory, for we lost 10,000 soldiers. We paid a heavy price for the victory, for we lost 10,000 soldiers. Translate This is a small price to pay for independence. Key这是为独立付出的小小代价。

26 overwhelm vt. — make (sb.) feel completely helpless, astonished, or embarrassed. Translate Fear overwhelmed me. e.g. At the age of forty, he was overwhelmed with work, illness and family problems. At the age of forty, he was overwhelmed with work, illness and family problems. More to learn More to learn

27 Overwhelmed by the disaster, … A past participial phrase, usually that of a transitive verb, can function as an adverbial modifying the main verb of the sentence to indicate cause, time, condition, concession, etc. Model As he was overwhelmed by the disaster, he retired with his family to a country retreat in Surrey. — Overwhelmed by the disaster, he retired with his family to a country retreat in Surrey. More to do More to do

28 Drill 1. We were startled by the appearance of a mouse, so we promptly decided to clean our room. 2. Because they’re tired of their own cooking, they’ve decided to go to a restaurant for a change. Startled by the appearance of a mouse, we promptly decided to clean our room. Tired of their own cooking, they’ve decided to go to a restaurant for a change. Overwhelmed by the disaster, …

29 retreat n. — a quiet or private place that one goes in order to rest or to concentrate on a particular problem or task. e.g. a summer retreat a summer retreat a weekend retreat a weekend retreat

30 come/go to the/one’s rescue — help sb. when they are in danger or difficulty Translate士兵们救起了这个快淹死的人。 e.g. We were about to close down the business, but the bank came to our rescue. We were about to close down the business, but the bank came to our rescue. I was embarrassed as I couldn’t remember his name; fortunately Mary came to my rescue. I was embarrassed as I couldn’t remember his name; fortunately Mary came to my rescue. Key The soldiers went to the rescue of the drowning man.

31 chance upon/on — meet or discover unexpectedly Translate He chanced upon the solution to the problem. He chanced upon the solution to the problem. e.g. She chanced upon some old love letters her husband kept in the back of the drawer. She chanced upon some old love letters her husband kept in the back of the drawer. I chanced upon an old friend in the street yesterday. I chanced upon an old friend in the street yesterday.

32 try one’s hand (at/doing sth.) — try a new activity to test one’s ability; make an inexperienced attempt e.g. After she lost her job, she thought she’d try her hand at writing a novel. After she lost her job, she thought she’d try her hand at writing a novel. I tried my hand at repairing the bike, but without much success. I tried my hand at repairing the bike, but without much success.

33 contemplate vt. — look at (sth.) for a long time in a quiet and very thoughtful way; gaze at e.g. She lay back on the grass to contemplated the high, blue sky. She lay back on the grass to contemplated the high, blue sky. The lonely little boy contemplated the waves at the seashore. The lonely little boy contemplated the waves at the seashore.

34 plunge into 1)push (sth.) suddenly and deeply into (sth.else) 2)get involved in (sth.) suddenly, without thinking carefully or preparing for it e.g. Heather plunged her hands deep into her pockets. Heather plunged her hands deep into her pockets. She plunged bravely into the debate. She plunged bravely into the debate.

35 before sb. know it — (informal) very quickly and suddenly e.g. At this time of the year, you could catch cold before you know it. At this time of the year, you could catch cold before you know it. Translate嫌疑人很快就被带到了警察局。 Key The suspects were taken to the police station before they knew it.

36 fall upon — attack suddenly and violently e.g. Terrorists were falling upon men and women in the street. Terrorists were falling upon men and women in the street. Translate强盗们从树后袭击了他。 Key The robbers fell upon him from behind the trees.

37 comfort n. — (a person or thing that brings) relief from worries, unhappiness, or disappointment e.g. The President’s visit has given some comfort to the earthquake victims. The President’s visit has given some comfort to the earthquake victims. His occasional visits and phone calls are a comfort to his parents in their old age. His occasional visits and phone calls are a comfort to his parents in their old age.

38 overcome vt. — overpower or overwhelm in body or mind e.g. The firefighters were overcome by smoke. The firefighters were overcome by smoke. Receiving the prize in honour of her dead father, she was overcome with emotion. Receiving the prize in honour of her dead father, she was overcome with emotion. Translate要克服恶习并不容易。 Key It is not easy to overcome a bad habit. It is not easy to overcome a bad habit.

39 take refuge in — find protection, help or relief in a place, person, action, etc. e.g. During the frequent air-raids people took refuge in their cellars. During the frequent air-raids people took refuge in their cellars. Translate The troubled movie star took refuge in silence. The troubled movie star took refuge in silence. Key麻烦缠身的电影明星以沉默来逃避一切。

40 entry n. — the act of entering; a person, thing or group that is entered in a race, competition, etc. e.g. Entry into the competition is free to all citizens. Entry into the competition is free to all citizens. Organizers of the speech contest have received over 10 entries. Organizers of the speech contest have received over 10 entries.

41 odd a. — (used after a number) with some extra; or so e.g. twenty odd years ago twenty odd years ago six hundred odd children six hundred odd children thirty-odd years thirty-odd years 二十多年前 六百多个学生 三十多岁

42 keep sb. company — 陪伴某人 e.g. Don’t worry. I’ll keep you company until your husband comes back. Don’t worry. I’ll keep you company until your husband comes back. The old couple were grateful for Mary’s company. The old couple were grateful for Mary’s company. Translate他总是很高兴与漂亮姑娘做伴。 Key He is always glad of pretty girls’ company. He is always glad of pretty girls’ company.

43 And so it was for my father. 1.His shoes are cheap, so is his suitcase. He plays golf well, so does his brother. He plays golf well, so does his brother. So + auxiliary verb + subject So + auxiliary verb + subject adding new information adding new information Compare the following groups of sentences: More to learn More to learn

44 And so it was for my father. 2.I said I would come, and so I will. — You have forgotten your hat. — You have forgotten your hat. — Ah, yes, so I have. — Ah, yes, so I have. So + subject +auxiliary verb So + subject +auxiliary verb expressing agreement expressing agreement Compare the following groups of sentences: More to do More to do

45 And so it was for my father. Drills 1.I hear you had a quarrel with your parents yesterday. _______ ( 的确如此 ), but it has been made up already. 2.In the end, I decided to apply to medical school, and ________________ ( 我兄弟也申请读医 ). 3.She recalls her father in this article in an emotional way. __________ ( 的确是这样 ). There’s a lot of feeling in it. __________ ( 的确是这样 ). There’s a lot of feeling in it. So I did So did my brother So she does

46 Guided Practice Vocabulary VocabularyVocabulary Cloze ClozeCloze Translation TranslationTranslation Structure Writing Structure WritingStructure WritingStructure Writing

47 III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 1. I’ve always envied painters and poets — I have no _____ abilities at all. 2.He’s struggling to _____ his fear of flying, but he still panics sometimes when he has to board a plane. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission Vocabulary  artistic  overcome Ex. III, p. 11 《读写教程 II 》 : Ex. III, p. 11

48 3.She held her newborn baby with _____ tenderness. 4.The whole nation was _____ into profound grief when Princess Diana died in an accident. Vocabulary III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission  infinite  plunged

49 5.The volunteers’ _____ is to work with the police to reduce crime on the streets of New York. 6.The city is planning a public _____ to awaken people to the problem of noise pollution. Vocabulary III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission  mission  campaign

50 7.He was knocked unconscious by a stone, and after I _____ him, he didn’t recognize me. _____ him, he didn’t recognize me. 8.Once their books are open, A students don’t let anything _____ them from their studies. Vocabulary III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission  revived  distract

51 9.Amanda wasn’t feeling well that day but she performed in the play with her _____ ease. 10.When you feel overwhelmed by the complications of life in the big city, it’s good to _____ to the countryside for a few days. Vocabulary III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission  accustomed  retreat

52 11.In times of war, people usually buy and store more food as a _____ against shortage. 12.The closing of the cigarette factory had _____ effects on the town’s economy. III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. accustomedprecautioncampaignartisticinfiniteplungedisastrousovercomereviveretreat distractmission  precaution  disastrous Vocabulary

53 Ex. IX, p. 16 《读写教程 II 》 : Ex. IX, p. 16 IX.Read the following carefully and choose one of the colored words or expressions to make the passage complete in meaning. Cloze

54 Churchill's childhood was an unhappy and lonely/alone one. A speech defect ( 缺陷 ), which he never entirely overwhelmed/overcame, made him a shy and hesitant child, and his only refuge/retreat was the friendship of Mrs. Everest, his beloved nurse. His poor performance at school led his disappointed father to send him to the Royal Military College – and to make matters worse, Winston failed the entrance exam ( 入学考试 ) twice before finally/in the end managing to pass it. Cloze

55 Cloze Once there, however/although, his abundant talent for the art of war became clear, and he graduated 20th in a class of 130. In 1895, the year his father died, he entered the army and was sent to Cuba, there/where he discovered his talent for writing. Churchill was delighting/delighted when his reports on the Cuban War of Independence ( 古巴独立战争 ) attracted wide attention, and he seriously contemplated/revived a career as a journalist.

56 Cloze Churchill's entry/retreat into politics was not a promising one: He lost his first election mission/campaign, although only by a narrow margin. To distract/rescue himself from this shameful failure, he fell upon/plunged into action, going to South Africa to report on the war there for London Morning Post. After a month/Within a month of his arrival, he had won fame for his part in the dramatic rescue/refuge of a train that had been taken under control by the enemy.

57 Cloze The train was freed, but Churchill was taken prisoner; and his fame was doubled when/then less than a month later he escaped from the prison. Returning to Britain as a military hero he again stood for election to Parliament in 1900 and won by an overwhelming/ overcoming margin.

58 Ex. XI, p. 17 《读写教程 II 》 : Ex. XI, p. 17 XI. Translate the following sentences into English. Translation

59 Translation 1. 老伴六十多岁时中风去世时, 那位 72 岁的退休教授不胜悲痛。 无人 依靠的生活对他来说将是非常困难的。 died of a stroke When his wife died of a stroke in her sixties, the 72-year-old retired professor was overwhelmed with grief. Life would be hard for him without anyone to rely on. was overwhelmed with grief rely on

60 Translation 2. 两位业余画家上个月在伦敦举办了一次个人画展。许多人前去参观, 其中包括一些著名的专业画家。 amateur painter Two amateur painters held an exhibition of their pictures last month in London. Many people went to see it, including a few celebrated professionals. went to see it professional

61 Translation 3. 当 20 世纪 80 年代中期, 7 名宇航员在 “ 挑战者 ” 号的灾难中遇难时,全世 界一下子陷入了震惊与悲痛中。 the Challenger disaster When seven astronauts died in the Challenger disaster in the mid-1980s, it plunged the whole world into shock and grief. plunged into shock and grief

62 Translation 4. 在结束了其第二届首相任期之后,她仍积极参与政治事务。当政府遇 到困难时,她屡次前来帮忙。 second prime ministry After completing her second prime ministry, she remained actively involved in political affairs. She came to the rescue several times when the government was in difficulty. involved in came to the rescue

63 Translation 5. 大选失败后,史密斯博士隐退到一个小村庄,在那里尝试耕作。 the election campaign After his failure in the election campaign, Dr. Smith retired to a small village, where he tried his hand at farming. retired tried his hand at

64 Translation 6. 只要你一辈子不停地努力工作,你在回忆往事时就会感到心满意足 的。 keep working hard As long as you keep working hard all your life, you will recall your past with a glow of satisfaction. recall with a glow of satisfaction

65 7. 我们必须唤醒人们认识到环境保护的重要性。否则,就为时太晚了。 Translation awaken … to... We must awaken people to the importance of environmental protection, or it will be too late. environmental protection or

66 8. 那位官员因卷入一件政治丑闻而被撤职。如果早知会落到这般地步, 他当初也许就会以不同的方式行事了。 Translation being involved in That official was removed from office for being involved in a political scandal. Had he known this would happen, he might have acted differently. was removed from office had he known might have

67 Structured Writing Now practice writing a paragraph that starts with a main event and goes on to describe what led up to it. Major event my love affair with English/amid very artistic circumstances What led up to it new radio/ wonderful English song/ not understand a single word singing everywhere/ night and day/ without words English/ my rescue I had just bought a new radio, and I heard the most wonderful English song – but I couldn’t understand a single word. I found myself singing the song everywhere, night and day, but without words. That’s when the miracle of English came to my rescue. I began my love affair with English amid every artistic circumstances.

68 Here are some major events for you to chose from as topics for your own paragraph. my sister Stephanie/ her love affair with television/ second grade/ hightly emotional circumstances I started my love affair with football… My brother began his love affair with stamp collecting… Structured Writing more details more details more details more details

69 Major event What led up to it a quarrel/ her best friend alone and lonely every day after school/ nothing to do television/ her rescue my sister Stephanie/ her love affair with television/ second grade/ hightly emotional circumstances Structured Writing

70 My sister Stephanie began her love affair with television in the second grade amid highly emotional circumstances. She had had a quarrel with her best friend, and found herself alone and lonely every day after school with nothing to do. That’s when the miracle of television came to her rescue. Structured Writing A Sample Paragraph

71 Assignment 1.Revision of Text A: ClozeEx. IXp.16ClozeEx. IXp.16 TranslationEx. XIp.17TranslationEx. XIp.17 2.Preview of Text B: Comprehension Checkp. 29Comprehension Check p. 29


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