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The Future of ET – A National Initiative Conference for Industry and Education Collaboration Orlando, Florida February 3, 2008 Presenters: Robert Herrick,

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Presentation on theme: "The Future of ET – A National Initiative Conference for Industry and Education Collaboration Orlando, Florida February 3, 2008 Presenters: Robert Herrick,"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Future of ET – A National Initiative Conference for Industry and Education Collaboration Orlando, Florida February 3, 2008 Presenters: Robert Herrick, Head, Electrical & Computer Engineering Technology, Purdue University Mark Pagano, Dean, Continuing Education & Conferences, Purdue University Michael O’Hair, Associate Dean, College of Technology, Purdue University Ray Morrison, President, ACETS, LLC Consulting Gerald Jakubowski, President, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Joseph Tidwell, College of Technology & Innovation, Arizona State University-East

2 Outline Session Overview (B. Herrick) Enrollment Statistics/Degrees Conferred/Accreditation (M. Pagano) Workforce Gap/STEM Pipeline (M. O’Hair) Business and Industry Hiring Needs (R. Morrison) Break Environmental Factors (G. Jakubowski) Where do we go from here? (J. Tidwell) Discussion and Audience Recommendations (J. Tidwell)

3 Problem Statement Mark Pagano

4 Fall ET Enrollments Source: “Engineering & Technology Enrollments, Fall 2007,” AAES EWC

5 2007 National ET Enrollment Breakdown by Gender and Underrepresented Minorities Source: “Engineering & Technology Degrees 2007,” AAES EWC

6 2007 National ET Enrollment Breakdown by Gender and Underrepresented Minorities Source: “Engineering & Technology Degrees 2007,” AAES EWC

7 ET Degrees Conferred Source: “Engineering & Technology Degrees 2007,” AAES EWC

8 Associate ET Degrees Conferred by Discipline Source: “Engineering & Technology Degrees 2007,” AAES EWC

9 Bachelor’s ET Degrees Conferred by Discipline Source: “Engineering & Technology Degrees 2007,” AAES EWC

10 Number of Accredited TAC Programs and Institutions Source: 2007 Accreditation Statistics,

11 Source: “A Proud Legacy of Quality Assurance in the Preparation of Technical Professionals,” ABET 75 th Anniversary Retrospective Increase/Decrease in Number of Accredited Programs,

12 Source: “A Proud Legacy of Quality Assurance in the Preparation of Technical Professionals,” ABET 75 th Anniversary Retrospective Increase/Decrease in Number of Institutions with Accredited Programs,

13 Workforce Gap/STEM Pipeline Issues Michael O’Hair

14 Effect of Retiring Baby-Boomers 1 The baby boom began in 1946; continued through 1964 During those 19 years, 76 million people were born In 1978, boomers made up approximately 45 percent of the labor force The percentage of workers 45 and older will increase from 33 percent of the workforce in 1998 to 40 percent in 2008 Over the same period, those aged 25 to 44 will decline from 51 percent to 44 percent After 2008, as more boomers retire, the impact will continue to grow 1 Gauging the Labor Effects of Retiring Baby-Boomers, Monthly Labor Review Online, July 2000.

15 Projected Percentage Change in Labor Force by Age AgePercent Change Total, 16 years and older and older to to to to

16 Employment Projections U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 1 Total job openings represent the sum of increases and net replacements Employment by Occupation, 2006 and Projected 2016 (in thousands) Employment NumberChange Total job openings due to growth and net replacements Title NumberPercent Engineers1,5121, Engineering Technicians

17 1 National Center for Education Statistics, Year (2006 and beyond is projected)

18 Engineering Technology Supply Base High Schools (main pipeline) –Quantity Engaging the schools (Talk about what ET graduates do – not curriculum) Engagement will enhance marketing and recruitment –Quality Build quality into our supply base through engagement –Tell teachers the specifications and skills we are looking for? Support STEM programs like First Robotics and PLTW Returning Adults –Quantity General advertising and targeted marketing, i.e. companies, returning veterans –Quality Before they matriculate – mostly out of our control After they matriculate – provide remedial education

19 Impact of Two Large STEM Programs Project Lead The Way (curricular program) –Programs are offered in some 3,000 middle and high schools in 50 states and the District of Columbia with over 300,000 students First Robotics (extra-curricular program) –First Robotics Challenge 37,500 HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS ON 1,501 TEAMS –First Tech Challenge 8,000 HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS ON 799 TEAMS –First Lego League 110,000 MIDDLE-SCHOOL STUDENTS ON 10,941 TEAMS –Junior First Lego League 5, YEAR-OLDS ON 1,004 TEAMS

20 Education Pipeline Assuring a Skilled Technical Workforce Education Pipeline rev Ray Morrison

21 Source: 2000 Census Leading Edge of the Baby Boom Generation are RETIRING Problem - Population Demographics Average Age of Engineers 53 Retirement Years (60) Female Male

22 There are Needs for Engineering the 21 st Century Engineers apply knowledge and skill to create products & services that are useful to mankind 20 th Century 3 B people Global Vision st Century 9 B people Agriculture Automobile Highways Air Conditioning Airplanes Space Communications Computing Internet Medical Tech Defense Lean Manufacturing High – Bandwidth Computing Communications Integrated Transportation Miniaturization Security & Safety Alternative Fuels Bio-Med & Genetics Nano & Materials Manned & Unmanned Controls

23 Engineering: Important in the 21 st Century Security*Defense and protection Quality of LifePeople and goods on the move TravelPeople and places GlobalConnected worldwide Public GoodSafety, environment, throughput CuriosityNano to space EconomicsStrong economic contribution TradeImpact of globalization Nutrition & HealthFeeding the world *Since “9/11” security has taken on a new significance “Protect & Connect”

24 Future Workforce May Be Different Will High tech: connected, tele-living, tele-working Demographic stress (replace retiring boomers) Diversity – more than ever Global – more than ever Self-employment will rise Employability security vs. employment security Knowledge management workers Lifelong learning, beyond initial college Ed Barlow, SME Conference, 6/1/01

25 Qualities for Future Success Integrity: High moral character, do what’s right – in the right way Intelligent: Technically competent, broadly-educated, business acumen, eager to learn, a thinker Capable: Opportunity identifier, problem solver, innovator, team player, risk taker, motivator, educator, mentor Adaptable: Take new roles, change projects, change locations Committed: Clear vision, tenacious, courageous pursuit of vision

26 Skills: Engineering Job Content Will Move Up the Value Chain Basics Methods Design Integration Requirements Wisdom Knowledge Management (Knowledge “Re-use”) Information Technology affects Work Content Data KM

27 Basic Math, Science and Computing Applied Math, Science and Computing Design and Manufacturing Humanities and Professional Skills Undergraduate Education is Full “The Basics” 135 credit hours are fully subscribed in today’s nominal “4-year” program Ref: John McMasters

28 Technical Education is Continuous Technical talent must be educated at school and beyond Education Continues into Professional Practice School Work Technical (engineering, math, science, computing) education and employment pipeline K-12 College Professional Practice Management & Business Teaching & Research BS ABET accredited 2 & 4 year education Emphasis on Science & Math On-the-job and formal training plus continued formal education Basics BS + 3 yr Specifics HS CC’s

29 Preparing Engineers for Their Career Engineering education has made great strides through the acceptance of the ABET EC & ET 2000 quality standard for accreditation. There is only so much material that can be covered in a four-year program; much has to be devoted to the basics of science, math, and engineering fundamentals. Industry and the new graduate have to accept their roles in continuing the specifics education process. “Nobody is going to take care of you – YOU MUST COMMAND YOUR OWN DESTINY!”

30 Technical Workforce Men and women with technical capability will be needed in the future to sustain growth and bring new innovation to improve quality of life throughout the world The retirement of the “baby boom” generation will accentuate the need for new talent in the next decade Improvements to design/build/service processes and tools will partially offset some of this demand Globalization will open new pools of technical talent; in the US, most foreign students return home to work; industry may pursue talent around the globe In the USA, the increased percentage of Latinos and African Americans, coupled with the need for women, will factor into the effort to assure a “pipeline” of talent

31 Future Business Depends on Diversity Agile, innovative companies need talent with diversity, including teams of different disciplines, linear and non- linear thinkers, working together attitudes, etc Diversity of thinking can stimulate innovation –New talent needs to come from a variety of schools in different parts of the country The nature of America’s population is changing and all types of talent needs to be tapped −Women and ethnic minorities are essential to meet future needs –Latino and African American populations will continue to increase in the future

32 Future Engineering Need & Supply *Note: Total workforce with Science & Engineering education exceeds 10M, 30+% work in S&E; Engineering accounts for 1.9M degrees and 1.3M working in the field, (NSF Science and Engineering Indicators 2000) Practicing Engineers (USA) Years M* Need Current Workforce How do we fill the gap? 2010 Most growth comes in the Computing Technology field 1/1/02

33 Session 2: Environmental Factors Future of Engineering and Engineering Technology Education Gerald S. Jakubowski

34 Outline Response to redefined engineering mission Concepts of innovation in a competitive world Future trends in engineering and engineering technology education

35 Background University of Toledo –Engineering and Engineering Technology (2 yr/4 yr) Memphis State University (U of Memphis) –Engineering and Engineering Technology (4 yr) Loyola Marymount University –Engineering and Science Arizona State University –Engineering and Engineering Technology (4 yr)

36 Premise I believe there is a shortage of technologists and technicians in the U.S. I believe there is a pressing need for more technologists and technicians in the U.S. I believe that it is incumbent upon us to create a message and start a marketing campaign to recruit prospective students to these programs.

37 Traditionally, universities have been viewed linearly on a sliding scale between “research” and “education.”

38 A new university view, however, could emerge if “innovation” were added into the scheme.

39 The Innovation University There is a need to bring more innovative products to market – sooner rather than later. Many have suggested that President Obama should create a new cabinet position – a “Department of Innovation.” I believe that many universities could better serve our nation if they moved more toward innovation and less away from research.

40 So innovation … What is it? What’s all the buzz about?

41 Innovation - Definition …the introduction of something new; …a new way of doing something; …involves the taking of the work of an individual or group of inventors and taking it to a broader audience.

42 Innovation – What it can do … Innovation is the confluence of science, engineering, technology and business. The goal of innovation is positive change – to make something better. Innovation is the fundamental source of increasing wealth in an economy. Bringing more innovative products to market could potentially increase employment and bring the nation out of its economic woes.

43 Where do engineers, technologists and technicians fit in an “innovation” university?

44 The Technical Team Craftsperson Technician Technologist Engineer Scientist As a team, each plays a major role in advancing innovation.

45 Scientist/ResearcherEngineerTechnologistTechnicianCraftsperson Education Required PhD, MS, BS +6 yearsMS, BS BSET (4 Year) ASET (2 Year) Trade School Research StageInnovation Stage Team Positions Research and development in basic sciences. Discovery of new inventions and intellectual property. Design, concept development, project management, risk and cost analysis, manufacturing. Machine and computer technologist, process control, prototype fabrication, technical documentation, trade and technician supervisor. Machine and computer technician, process control, prototype fabrication, technical documentation, trade supervisor. Assembly, machine operator, maintenance. The Technical Team

46 Abstract Scientific Principles Management Industrial Sales Operations and Maintenance Construction and Production Design Development Research Application of principles in various engineering functions.

47 What can we as engineers, technologists and technicians bring to the table?

48 The Innovation University By working with companies and entrepreneurs, we can help bring new products to market; and We can help produce an educated workforce that is needed for bringing innovative products to market.

49 Future Trends Charles Vest, President NAE 2008 ASEE Annual Conference in Pittsburgh

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60 How Can the Grand Challenges be Met? By recognizing that these complex problems cannot be solved along traditional engineering disciplines; By re-visiting the concept and focusing on the concept of the “entire technical team;” By using a team approach; By knocking down the silo mentality and developing interdisciplinary programs; and By developing innovation universities.

61 Rose-Hulman Rose-Hulman Ventures Collaborative Partnership with Ivy Tech Community College R-H is walking the talk!

62 Figure 2 – Block Diagram of Rose-Hulman and Ivy Tech Collaboration

63 Employment Projections U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 1 Total job openings represent the sum of increases and net replacements Employment by Occupation, 2006 and Projected 2016 (in thousands) Employment NumberChange Total job openings due to growth and net replacements Title NumberPercent Engineers1,5121, Engineering Technicians

64 Engineering Technology Supply Base High Schools (main pipeline) –Quantity Engaging the schools (what our graduates do, not curriculum) Marketing and recruitment should be enhanced with engagement –Quality Building quality into our supply base through engagement –What are the specifications and skills we are looking for? Support S TE M programs like First Robotics and PLTW Returning Adults –Quantity General advertising and targeted marketing, i.e. companies –Quality Mostly out of our control

65 I believe it is incumbent upon us to create a message and start a marketing campaign to recruit prospective students to engineering and engineering technology programs and to promote the concept of innovation.

66 Discussion

67 Education/Industry Partnerships: Where do we go from here? Education Pipeline rev Joseph Tidwell

68 U.S. Population Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2003 Latinos & African Americans today make up 1/4 of population

69 Projected U.S. Population by Race: Source: U.S. Census Bureau *Includes American Indian and Alaska Native alone, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander alone, and two more races

70 Engineering Bachelor’s degrees in U.S. (all degree types) Source: National Science Foundation, 2002

71 U.S. Engineering Workforce (all degree types) Source: National Science Foundation, 2000 Latinos & African Americans lag in engineering workforce at 1/4 of Census Participation Women comprise ~10% of the engineering workforce Women receive ~20% of engineering degrees (2004)

72 U.S. Population under age 18 Source: U.S Census Bureau, 2003 Diversity will increase over time; Latinos and African Americans are 33% of census and 15% of college engineering classes

73 The Technical Workforce Pipeline Technical talent must be raised, educated and put to work Technical (engineering, math, science, computing) education and employment pipeline School Work K-12 College Professional Practice Transition to other jobs CradleGrave Overall education system Jobs for all BS PhD Attract CC’s Attrition & other jobs HS System Framework Grad School

74 The Technical Workforce Pipeline Technical talent must be raised, educated, and put to work K-12 College Grad Professional Practice School Areas where we can take action and support School Work CradleGrave Overall education systemJobs for all Technical (engineering, math, science, computing) education and employment pipeline BS PhD Attract CC’s Attrition Technical Career Encouragement Better Prepare Science & Math Educators Retain Foreign Students Increase Diversity & Participation Support Colleges Continual Learning Government Education & Research Professional Development Organizations HS Support Students Cultural Change

75 The Technical Workforce Pipeline Technical talent must be raised, educated, and put to work Examples of Assistance to Education CradleGrave Overall education systemJobs for all Technical (engineering, math, science, computing) education and employment pipeline K-12 College Grad Professional Practice School BS PhD Attract CC’s School Work Attrition Mentor Middle & High School Students Support Science & Math Educators; Teacher Institutes; Industry Volunteers ABET EC & ET 2000 Scholarships Education Support Advisory Boards Equipment Internal Education Tuition Reimbursement Professional Studies HS “Encouragement”: FIRST, Tutoring, SAE World Motion & PLTW

76 Technical Workforce Pipeline Our future depends on capable technical workforce We need to do our part to assure a “pipeline” of talent This is a “holistic” effort Our support should have these aspects: - Support for K-12 students and science & math teachers -- focus on primary & middle school - Education goes beyond giving money -- mentoring, training - Volunteerism is important - Support for college students and selected schools - Acceptance that we all have a role in continued education - Education doesn’t stop with the degree - Company relationship is significant - Personal involvement is important

77 How can we help the pipeline? The overall need for technical workers will continue. Many youth are in the system, but only a few take up the Engineering and Technical career path. More need to be encouraged in Math & Science, particularly early in the K-12 segment. Many technical people go on to other occupations later in their career. Engineering offers numerous career paths. Industry and government can play several roles by encouraging both students & the education system: - Science, Math & Technical aspects in K-12 education - Technical education, access & diversity in college - Continual learning for industry employees

78 What can be done to improve? All parties need to do their part to strengthen the Pipeline; no single entity can do it all. It is a holistic process. Young people, their parents, mentors, industry, academia, government, et al, have finite resource capability. A change in our culture may be necessary to promote and support desirable technical careers. We need to know which initiatives actually are effective in raising the number of technical workers, particularly those from under-represented segments. We need to be more effective in what we do.

79 Discussion of Solutions


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