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Study 3- Labour Market Demand for STEM Occupations February, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Study 3- Labour Market Demand for STEM Occupations February, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Study 3- Labour Market Demand for STEM Occupations February, 2014

2 Main messages Many skills in short supply, but the main STEM positions reported as hard to fill are: software engineer, engineers, technicians, electricians and fitters Employers are using their own networks to find recruits rather than getting in touch with HEIs or TVETs Mismatch between employers and students perceptions on STEM teaching Employers are uncertain about needed skills in future The links are weak among employers and TVET/HEIs

3 Main Message 1: Employers say that they still have difficulty in recruiting the skilled people that they need. FrequencyPercentage Can find an operators whose qualifications meet your demand % Can find a technician whose qualifications meet your demand % Can find a technical manager whose qualifications meet your demand %

4 Employers’ understanding of why they can’t recruit There is a shortage of specialists in the country People are not trained for these skills These skills are not considered to be trendy

5 FrequencyPercentage Ask colleagues to recruit such staff % Announce a job vacancy % Get in touch with HR Agencies 53.3% Ask Universities or TVETs to provide me with candidates 85.3% I find with help of acquaintances 64.0% I offer better conditions than other employers 32.0% Main Message 2: Employers are using their own networks to find recruits N=150

6 When employers recruit an untrained person 73% conduct internal training 12.5% use external training Around half of employers think they can recruit young people with the skills, knowledge, attitudes and work habits that will make for success

7 Agree & strongly agree Neither disagree or agree Disagree or strongly disagree Don’t know or can’t say Doing a good job of developing the skills needed in your firm? 32.6%20%29.3%18% Doing a good job of developing the skills needed in your area of activity? 33.3%23.3%26%17.3% Correctly focused on the real job opportunities in this region? 18.7%32.0%25.3%24.0% Employers’ opinion about HEI N=150 Main Message 3: Mismatch between employers and students perceptions on STEM teaching

8 Majority of HEI students rate STEM teaching at HEI high 80% of university students interviewed think their teachers know their subjects well 72.7% say their faculty explains things well 68% say their faculty is developing their skills well 71.3% say their faculty is in touch with the labor market Employers were less positive

9 Agree & strongly agree Neither disagree or agree Disagree or strongly disagree Don’t know or can’t say Doing a good job of developing the skills needed in your firm? 24.0%16.0%32.0%28% Doing a good job of developing the skills needed in your area of activity? 24.7%16.0%28.7%30.7% Correctly focused on the real job opportunities in this region? 25.4%21.3%21.4%32.0% Small portion of employers think TVETs develop skills needed N=150

10 Vast majority of TVET students rate STEM teaching high 94% of students think their teachers know their subjects well 91% rate their teachers’ ability to develop the skills of the student as good. 88% thought their teachers were in touch with the labor market Employers were less positive

11 Employer opinion on STEM teaching at schools 22.6% thought that the schools were doing a good job but 28.7% thought that they were not Employers think 7.3% of teachers are aware of labor market issues and trends, 27.3% thought that they are not.

12 Students evaluation of STEM subject teaching at school The difference between University and TVET students is notable University students provide more positive rating for all STEM subjects taught at school compared with TVET students The highest difference is observed in case of Math and the lowest in case of Chemistry

13 Low awareness of STEM careers at school TVET students surveyed reported they were not very aware of STEM career opportunities while at school; the numbers citing that they were aware were: Science 22.0%, Technical 37.0%, Engineering 31.0%, Math 25.0%. For University students the numbers citing that they were aware were: Science 40.7%, Technical 56.6%, Engineering 48.7% and Math 54.7%.

14 UniversityScienceTechnicalEngineeringMath At school 35.7%54.6%51.3%52% At University 79.3%87.3%77.3%78.7% How much do students know about STEM jobs? TVETScienceTechnicalEngineeringMath At school 22%39%36%31% At University 58%80%69%58%

15 ScienceTechnicalEngineeringMath Boys 38.9%62.0%59.3%51.9% Girls 28.6%35.7%31%52.4% Girls know less about STEM Jobs than boys

16 Student knowledge of scholarships 42.0% of University students interviewed said they had received information about scholarships at school while 47.3% of University students interviewed were sure they had not For TVET students the figures were 9.0% had received information and 84.0% had not received information about scholarships at school.

17 HEI & TVET focus on real job opportunities 42.6% of university students interviewed reported that there was this focus on real job opportunities and 63% of TVET students interviewed share this opinion. 36% of university students interviewed reported that their institution is involved in student employment; for TVET respondents the figure is 51%. BUT 12% of employers reported that they take placements from HEI & TVET and 7.3% talk to universities about their training needs

18 46.7% agree that new skills will be needed When asked what these new skills would be, employers were less sure. The largest responses were Technologist, Engineer and Electrician as the main areas but only 6% said this. Other skills indicated were at even lower levels There was a view from 18% that the new skills would be a mix of existing skills or possibly new skills 70% never discuss this issue with fellow employers Main message 4: Employers are uncertain about needed skills in future

19 What are the current ‘hard to recruit’ skills: – Software engineer 13% – Engineer 10.7% – Technician 7.3% – Electrician 6% – Fitter 5.3% – Mechanic 3.3%

20 What are Future ‘hard to recruit’ skills – Technologist / technician 12.7% – Electrician 12.7% – Engineer 12.7% – Mechanic 10% – Welder 8.6% – Metallurgist 3% – Fitter 3% – Plumber 3%

21 Priority operator areas – Electrician – Fitter – Mechanic – Welder – Plumber

22 Priority technician and technical manager areas – Software engineer – Engineer – Technician – Technologist – Electrician – Engineer – Metallurgist

23 Sectors where the skills are needed – Chemicals and pharmaceuticals – Electric production and delivery (electricians are trained but mostly for the construction industry) – Gas transportation and delivery – Water and sewage – Mining and processing – Logistics and rail – Computer and related activities – Manufacturing of electrical and optical, transport equipment, other manufacturing

24 Main message 5: links are weak among employers and TVET /HEIs 75% said “I do not have any kind of relationship with local universities” 90% say that they have no relationship with TVETs (reflected in lower employment rates for TVET graduates compared to HEI)s

25 Summary of recommendations A STEM school teaching improvement programme to be implemented A strategic partnership development of TVET and University vocational education and training with government and employers An upgrading of teaching skills and facilities at TVET and Universities Career guidance in schools is a clear need Improved information packs about further vocational education in STEM fields distributed to schools. The Universities and TVETs need to be encouraged to coordinate their efforts on this and also to engage more strategically with schools.

26 Summary of recommendations Strategic action to address skill shortage areas Competence standards need to be agreed on a sectoral basis Policy makers need to work closely with employers who are generally sceptical about existing vocational education providers’ ability to deliver needed skills


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