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Developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED A perspective on partnership John Carr Director, Training and Qualifications for Teachers.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED A perspective on partnership John Carr Director, Training and Qualifications for Teachers."— Presentation transcript:

1 developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED A perspective on partnership John Carr Director, Training and Qualifications for Teachers Training and Development Agency for Schools APTE Conference The Met Hotel, Leeds 15 July 2010

2 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED The Importance of Teaching: The Schools White Paper (November 2010)

3 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED TDA remit letter for

4 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (June 2011)

5 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED The role of schools “… over the next five to ten years we expect that, rather than Government managing much of the ITT system centrally, schools should increasingly take on this responsibility. This does not mean that universities would not be involved: far from it. Groups of schools, often led by the new Teaching Schools, might lead ITT partnerships and draw on support from universities and other providers.” Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (June 2011)

6 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED The debate? “The part of the field which we are to examine has long been a battleground for the expert, and many questions call for discussion. What, for example, should be the purpose of professional training? – its character and duration? Where should it be given and by whom?.... At what age should it commence? – and is a system of apprenticeship desirable?” Lance Jones - The Training of Teachers in England and Wales (1923)

7 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Partnership – embedded in the culture? (ITT) All ITT programmes include periods of time spent in training in schools or other settings… A four year undergraduate QTS programme 160 days (32 weeks) A three year QTS undergraduate programme 120 days (24 weeks) A one year graduate QTS programme days ( weeks) Employment based schemes As determined by the training programme, which is based in school

8 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Partnership – embedded in the culture? (CPD) Training Schools and clusters – the School Partnerships Project Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) “A new working level of partnership appears to have evolved naturally and is testament to the widespread recognition of the value and importance of a cooperative approach to the planning, delivery and evaluation of PPD.” A longitudinal review of the postgraduate professional development of teachers (2009) Masters in Teaching and Learning (MTL) “a workplace-based programme led jointly by HEI tutors and school-based coaches, working in partnership” The National Framework for Masters in Teaching and Learning (2008)

9 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Partnership – embedded in the culture? (Schools) Headspace Survey (Autumn 2010 )

10 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED National priorities “We want to tackle two specific weaknesses consistently identified by new teachers in the initial training they have received: “for primary teachers, the ability and confidence to teach reading effectively, including using systematic synthetic phonics; “feeling able to establish and maintain a good standard of behaviour in the classroom.” Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (June 2011)

11 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Leading Partners in Literacy and Mathematics projects (2011) Aims to “strengthen training in the priority areas of mathematics and literacy … by … working with the sector to help evaluate, capture and disseminate models of targeted placements developed to: support trainee and teacher learning, and strengthen schools’ role in training, through partnership; demonstrate how schools’ involvement in training can support children’s learning and raise standards in literacy and mathematics; demonstrate how schools can organise effective training environments which also support children’s learning; build coherence across training in core subjects and integrate school- and centre-based training.

12 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED “Schools Direct” A school or group of schools applies to the new Teaching Agency (TA) to be able to offer a training place. The TA approves the application. The school advertises the training place … selects a trainee and chooses an accredited ITT provider to work with to provide the training*. If the trainee attracts DfE funding … the Agency releases funding to the accredited provider. Once the trainee has completed training and gained QTS, the school will be expected to employ the trainee. Priority will be given to the schools and subjects with the greatest need. * Any places are delivered through “school direct” will not count against the provider’s allocation of places through the continuing system of allocating places directly to ITT providers.

13 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED University-School Partnerships “In the allocation of places, we propose to prioritise the strongest university-school partnerships that are able to demonstrate features such as: guaranteed high quality placements for trainees, especially in outstanding schools, attached to teachers whose lessons have been judged to be outstanding, and attached to subject departments judged to be outstanding; shared staff between the university and school; university presence on school governing bodies or their committees.” Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (June 2011)

14 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED University Training Schools “We will invite some of the best higher education providers of initial teacher training to open University Training Schools. These are used widely in Finland as a means of training teachers in practice. There are similar successful models in the US, including for example ‘lab schools’ in Chicago.” The Importance of Teaching: the Schools White Paper (2010) “We will also encourage our best university providers to develop University Training Schools. Based on a Finnish model, these schools have the potential for excellence in teaching, research and teacher training.” Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (2011 )

15 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED University Training Schools Schools set up and run by universities Three combined and equally important core functions: – teaching pupils; – training and development of novice and experienced teachers; – pedagogical research. Universities with especially high performing ITT departments and a strong reputation for education research, becoming stronger by combining this with “clinical practice”. Innovators of teaching and training techniques; sharing these with others

16 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Teaching Schools … will identify and coordinate expertise in partner schools, using the best leaders and teachers to … work with other strategic partners, including universities, to train new entrants to the profession … are likely to take responsibility for: – assessing trainees’ needs and ensuring appropriate provision to meet them – managing high quality school experiences – making sure trainees have excellent support – ensuring rigorous assessment of trainees – demonstrating a capacity to respond to local, regional and national priorities – encouraging greater involvement in ITT across their partners and supporting their partners in improving the quality of ITT – ensuring progression and coherence with other professional development programmes National teaching schools Prospectus (2011)

17 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Partnership – embedded in the culture? “The challenge is.. not so much about getting the balance right between theory and practice, as of ensuring the right interaction between them.” Report on practical classroom training within Initial Teacher Education (European Commission, 2010)

18 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED The role of schools? “… over the next five to ten years we expect that, rather than Government managing much of the ITT system centrally, schools should increasingly take on this responsibility. This does not mean that universities would not be involved: far from it. Groups of schools, often led by the new Teaching Schools, might lead ITT partnerships and draw on support from universities and other providers.” Training our next generation of outstanding teachers: An improvement strategy for discussion (June 2011)

19 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Responses to the ITT Strategy document? The proposed changes to initial teacher training set out for consultation today are a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist, says …. The Universities Council for the Education of Teachers (UC.... today welcomed the government’s proposed reforms to teacher training….

20 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Responses to the ITT Strategy document? The proposed changes to initial teacher training set out for consultation today are a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist, says the Association of School and College Leaders. The Universities Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) today welcomed the government’s proposed reforms to teacher training….

21 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED “I have often wondered why teachers, as a body, in elementary and secondary schools alike, do not demand a larger share in training. The trained teachers are to join their staffs … yet, in effect, they are content to entrust the training to persons who, however skilled, are at the time outside the schools.’ Unknown, 1928 Quoted in Brooks A ‘quiet revolution’? The impact of Training Schools on initial teacher training partnerships (2006)

22 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED “At present, responsibility for the monitoring and support of trainees rests with the training provider until the trainee takes up his/her first post. It then passes, with variable success, to the school and local authority. Failure to offer trainees a smooth transition from initial training to the induction year and into the early years of their teaching career is a widely held criticism of existing teacher training arrangements. The move from initial training to induction was described by one witness as like “falling off the edge of a cliff”.” House of Commons Children, Schools and Families Committee Report on Training of Teachers (January 2010)

23 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED The future? Same challenge … different perspective?

24 developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED John Carr Director, Training and Qualifications for Teachers Training and Development Agency for Schools


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