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WORLD LITERATURE 28/10-27/11 Tuesday 12-14 aud IV, Thursday 12- 14 aud II (main building) Tyy 228E, 346E, 347E.

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Presentation on theme: "WORLD LITERATURE 28/10-27/11 Tuesday 12-14 aud IV, Thursday 12- 14 aud II (main building) Tyy 228E, 346E, 347E."— Presentation transcript:

1 WORLD LITERATURE 28/10-27/11 Tuesday aud IV, Thursday aud II (main building) Tyy 228E, 346E, 347E

2 WORLD LITERATURE 28/10 Lecture 30/10 Lecture 04/10 Lecture 06/11 Lecture 11/11 Presentations 13/11 Presentations 18/11 Presentations 20/11 Presentations 25/11 Presentations 27/11 Presentations

3 WORLD LITERATURE Essay by the end of December, 2014

4 WORLD LITERATURE J.W. von Goethe: It is to be hoped that people will soon be convinced that there is no such thing as patriotic art or patriotic scene. Both belong, like all good things, to the whole world, and can be fostered only by untrammeled intercourse among all contemporaries, continually bearing in mind what we have inherited from the past.

5 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: German literature, as can be seen from our dailies and the two latest literary magazines, offers only exclamations, sighs and interjections produced by well-meaning individuals. Views are expressed according to temperament and education. There is hardly any concern for more universal or loftier matters.

6 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: German literature, as can be seen from our dailies and the two latest literary magazines, offers only exclamations, sighs and interjections produced by well-meaning individuals. Views are expressed according to temperament and education. There is hardly any concern for more universal or loftier matters.

7 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: My confident statement that in these truly stirring times, and with the consequent greater ease of communication, there is hope of a world literature in the immediate future, has met with the approval of our western neighbours, who to be sure could do great things in this matter, (…).

8 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: These journals, as they gradually reach a wider public, will contribute most effectively to the universal world literature we hope for; we repeat however that there can be no question of the nation’s thinking alike, the aim is simply that they shall grow aware of one another, understand each other, and, even where they may not be able to love, may at least tolerate one another.

9 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: I should like to have your opinion on how far this Tasso can be considered English. You will greatly oblige me by informing me on this point; for it is just this connection between original and the translation that expresses most clearly the relationship of nation to nation and that one must above all know (understand) if one wishes to encourage a common world literature transcending national boundaries.

10 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: Here we note something new, perhaps scarcely felt, and never expressed before: that the translator is working not for his own nation alone but also for the nation from whose language he takes the work.

11 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: Carlyle has written a life of Schiller, and judged him as if would be difficult for a German to judge him. On the other hand, we are clearer about Shakespeare and Byron, and can, appreciate their merits better than the English themselves.

12 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: It is pleasant to see that intercourse is now so close between the French, English, and the Germans, that we shall be able to correct one another.

13 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: In this connection it might be added that what I call world literature develops in the first place when the differences that prevail within one nation are resolved through the understanding and judgment of the rest.

14 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: The various branches of world literature react sharply and strangely on one another; if I am not mistaken, taking a broad and general view, the French gain most by it; they have, too, a kind of premonition that their literature will have, in the highest sense, the same influence on Europe that it gained in the first half of the eighteenth century.

15 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: the immediate consequences of a general world literature; the nations will be quicker in benefiting by each other´s advantages.

16 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: Germans are weakest in the aesthetic department, and may wait long before we meet such a man as Carlyle.

17 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: I am convinced that a world literature is in process of formation, that the nations are in favor of it and for this reason make friendly overtures. The German can and should be most active in this respect; he has a fine part to play in this great mutual approach.

18 WORLD LITERATURE Goethe: All nations are paying attention to us; they praise and criticize, accept and reject, imitate and distort, understand or misunderstand us and open or close their hearts to our concerns. WORLD LITERATURE

19 Goethe: Left to itself every literature will exhaust its vitality, if it is not refreshed by the interest and contributions of a foreign one. What naturalist does not take pleasure in the wonderful things that he sees produced by reflection in a mirror?

20 WORLD LITERATURE Now what a mirror in the field of ideas and morals means, everyone has experienced in himself, and once his attention is aroused, he will understand how much of his education he owes to it.

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