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There are brochures in the rack that may be useful to you.

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Presentation on theme: "There are brochures in the rack that may be useful to you."— Presentation transcript:

1 There are brochures in the rack that may be useful to you.

2 INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS SEMINAR asiasociety.org

3 Credentialing Foundations Practice

4 Who are you? Mention your name and re-affirm the most important fact about yourself such as your experience with the topic.

5 Who are you? Mention your name and re-affirm the most important fact about yourself such as your experience with the topic. John Parry Centre for Teaching and Learning

6 What is your topic? Give a brief explanation of your topic, just a little longer than the title of your talk. Don’t give away the secret of your talk, but whet their appetite.

7 What is your topic? Give a brief explanation of your topic, just a little longer than the title of your talk. Don’t give away the secret of your talk, but whet their appetite. I.S.S.

8 Why is it important? Finally, tell the audience why the topic is important to them. What will they have gained by the time the talk is finished? The entire opening should only take a minute or two.

9 Why is it important? Finally, tell the audience why the topic is important to them. What will they have gained by the time the talk is finished? The entire opening should only take a minute or two. To prepare you to teach at UBC-O

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11 Learning Outcome for today Participants will be able to integrate the six elements of lesson design into a 10 minute microteaching lesson.

12 Effective Teaching Practices Think of a time when you were “learning well”. What were the conditions? Think of a time when you were “learning well”. What were the conditions?

13 Does everyone learn in the same way? Does everyone learn in the same way?

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15 Brainstorm characteristics of a good teacher. cyber-kap.blogspot.com

16 Knowledge of Content

17 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy

18 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management

19 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management Diversity

20 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnology

21 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResources

22 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResourcesAssessment

23 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResourcesAssessmentProfessionalism

24 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResourcesAssessmentProfessionalismPlanning

25 Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResourcesAssessmentProfessionalismPlanningCommunication

26 Teaching Strategies Knowledge of Content Pedagogy Classroom Management DiversityTechnologyResourcesAssessmentProfessionalismPlanningCommunication

27 Lesson Basics: What makes up a lesson?

28 B.O.P.P.P.S. promotiontours.ca

29 BOPPPSBridge-in Your introduction, hook or anticipatory set Objective States what you hope to achieve and what you intend the participants to learn. Pre-assessment Assess what the learner already knows Participatory learning Learning activities to help learners meet objectives Post-Assessment Demonstrates learners learning Summary Learner reflection

30 undiscoveredscotland.co.uk Bridge – In…

31 Refer to past learning Refer to past learning undiscoveredscotland.co.uk

32 Refer to past learning Refer to past learning Active Participation Active Participation undiscoveredscotland.co.uk

33 Refer to past learning Refer to past learning Active Participation Active Participation Where are we headed to day? Where are we headed to day? –Goal or –Objective undiscoveredscotland.co.uk

34 Your turn … Think of a topic that you will be teaching this term and come up with a couple of Bridge-In possibilities.

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36 Learning Outcomes

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38 Analysis Content Context Learner

39 Analysis Learning Outcomes Content Context Learner

40 Analysis Instructional Strategies Learning outcomes Content Context Learner

41 Analysis Instructional Strategies Assessment Learning Outcomes Content Context Learner

42 Listing your learning outcomes is the clearest way to communicate expectations to students. Listing your learning outcomes is the clearest way to communicate expectations to students. The syllabus is a good place for them! The syllabus is a good place for them! Well-written learning outcomes inform all on what is to be learned, and how assessment will occur. Well-written learning outcomes inform all on what is to be learned, and how assessment will occur.

43 We know that students learn more effectively and successfully when they know what the end result of their learning will be.

44 Habit 1: Be Proactive Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind Habit 3: Put First Things First Habit 4: Think Win-Win Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood Habit 6: Synergize Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw

45 Habit 1: Be Proactive Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind Habit 3: Put First Things First Habit 4: Think Win-Win Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood Habit 6: Synergize Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw

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48 Intended Learning Outcomes University Level University Level What are the attributes of an ideal graduate of the university?

49 Intended Learning Outcomes University Level University Level What are the attributes of an ideal graduate of the university? Programme Level Programme Level What are the intended learning outcomes for students enrolled in your programme?

50 Intended Learning Outcomes University Level University Level What are the attributes of an ideal graduate of the university? Programme Level Programme Level What are the intended learning outcomes for students enrolled in your programme? Subject level Subject level What are the intended learning outcomes for students taking a particular course within the programme?

51 Writing an effective Learning Outcome Learning Outcome should be learner (student) centred, not instructor centred. Instructor Centred OutcomeLearner Centred Outcome During this session the instructor will introduce the criteria used in determining the strength of a support system. By the end of the session the students will be able to apply the criteria necessary to determine the strength of the support system presented.

52 Participants will learn tennis … Carine06

53 Participants will learn to play tennis … Carine06

54 Participants will learn to play the tennis forehand stroke … Carine06

55 Participants will learn to play the tennis forehand stroke, by returning 7 out of 10 accurately within court … Carine06

56 Participants will learn the rules of tennis … Carine06

57 Participants will learn the rules of tennis and be able to pass a test … Carine06

58 Participants will learn the rules of tennis and be able to pass a test and score 75% … Carine06

59 Participants will learn the rules of tennis and be able to apply the rules in a game … Carine06

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61 Knowledge: Recall data or information. Examples: Recite a policy. Quote prices from memory to a customer. Knows the safety rules. Key Words: defines, describes, identifies, knows, labels, lists, matches, names, outlines, recalls, recognizes, reproduces, selects, states. These descriptors are from Don (Donald Clark) Edmonds, Washington

62 Comprehension: Understand the meaning, translation, interpolation, and interpretation of instructions and problems. State a problem in one's own words. Examples: Rewrites the principles of test writing. Explain in one's own words the steps for performing a complex task. Translates an equation into a computer spreadsheet. Key Words: comprehends, converts, defends, distinguishes, estimates, explains, extends, generalizes, gives an example, infers, interprets, paraphrases, predicts, rewrites, summarizes, translates.

63 Application: Use a concept in a new situation or unprompted use of an abstraction. Applies what was learned in the classroom into novel situations in the work place. Examples: Use a manual to calculate an employee's vacation time. Apply laws of statistics to evaluate the reliability of a written test. Key Words: applies, changes, computes, constructs, demonstrates, discovers, manipulates, modifies, operates, predicts, prepares, produces, relates, shows, solves, uses.

64 Analysis: Separates material or concepts into component parts so that its organizational structure may be understood. Distinguishes between facts and inferences. Examples: Troubleshoot a piece of equipment by using logical deduction. Recognize logical fallacies in reasoning. Gathers information from a department and selects the required tasks for training. Key Words: analyzes, breaks down, compares, contrasts, diagrams, deconstructs, differentiates, discriminates, distinguishes, identifies, illustrates, infers, outlines, relates, selects, separates.

65 Synthesis: Builds a structure or pattern from diverse elements. Put parts together to form a whole, with emphasis on creating a new meaning or structure. Examples: Write a company operations or process manual. Design a machine to perform a specific task. Integrates training from several sources to solve a problem. Revises and process to improve the outcome. Key Words: categorizes, combines, compiles, composes, creates, devises, designs, explains, generates, modifies, organizes, plans, rearranges, reconstructs, relates, reorganizes, revises, rewrites, summarizes, tells, writes.

66 Evaluation: Make judgments about the value of ideas or materials. Examples: Select the most effective solution. Hire the most qualified candidate. Explain and justify a new budget. Key Words: appraises, compares, concludes, contrasts, criticizes, critiques, defends, describes, discriminates, evaluates, explains, interprets, justifies, relates, summarizes, supports.

67 Think of the mini lesson you will teach next time and write a learning outcome.

68 Assess the learning outcome … What will the learner do? Which level of Bloom? Is the activity observable? Is the activity measurable? Is the learning outcome derived from the concept map?

69 Write another leaning outcome: One that applies to a particular day in a course you might be TA’ing.

70 Assess your partner’s learning outcome … What will the learner do? Which level of Bloom? Is the activity observable? Is the activity measurable? Is the learning outcome derived from the concept map?

71 Tips for Writing Objectives Objectives should specify four main things: Objectives should specify four main things: – Audience - Who? Who is this aimed at? – Behavior - What? What do you expect them to be able to do? Use action verbs to describe an overt, observable behavior. – Condition - How? Under what circumstances will the learning occur? – Degree - How much? This is often called the ABCD's of objectives. This is often called the ABCD's of objectives.

72 Given the discussion on learning outcomes, participants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Audience - Green Behavior - Red Condition - Yellow Degree - Blue

73 Given the discussion on learning outcomes, participants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Audience - Green Behavior - Red Condition - Yellow Degree - Blue

74 Given the discussion on learning outcomes, participants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Audience - Green Behavior - Red Condition - Yellow Degree - Blue

75 Given the discussion on learning objectives, participants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Audience - Green Behavior - Red Condition - Yellow Degree - Blue

76 Given the discussion on learning outcomesparticipants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Given the discussion on learning outcomes, participants will be able to write an objective applicable to their course that includes the stated criteria. Audience - Green Behavior - Red Condition - Yellow Degree - Blue

77 Review Learning Outcomes A statement that specifies in some observable and/or measurable way what a learner will know or be able to do by the end of a lesson or series of lessons.

78 Analysis Instructional Strategies Assessment Objectives or Learning Outcomes Content Context Learner

79 BOPPPSBridge-in Your introduction, hook or anticipatory set Objective States what you hope to achieve and what you intend the participants to learn. Pre-assessment Assess what the learner already knows Participatory learning Learning activities to help learners meet objectives Post-Assessment Demonstrates learners learning Summary Learner reflection

80 Time for a short break

81 BOPPPSBridge-in Your introduction, hook or anticipatory set Objective States what you hope to achieve and what you intend the participants to learn. Pre-assessment Assess what the learner already knows Participatory learning Learning activities to help learners meet objectives Post-Assessment Demonstrates learners learning Summary Learner reflection

82 Pre-Assessment Where are your learners at? Where are your learners at? –Previous knowledge and experiences –May assist in grouping students or peer teaching

83 Analysis Instructional Strategies Assessment Objectives or Learning Outcomes Content Context Learner

84 Participatory or Active Learning I hear and I forget. I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I see and I remember. I do and I understand. I do and I understand.

85 I hear and I forget I see and I remember I do and I understand

86 Most of the time students are involved only passively in learning: in listening to the instructor, looking at the occasional overhead or slide, reading the text book.

87 Research shows that such passive involvement generally leads to a limited retention of knowledge by students. Adapted from R.M. Felder and R. Brent Effective Teaching Workshop, North Carolina State University, 1997

88 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we see and hear 70% of what we say 90% of what we say and do Adapted from R.M. Felder and R. Brent Effective Teaching Workshop, North Carolina State University, 1997

89 Participatory or Active Learning What are active learning strategies and how can we use them in a course?

90 Examples (Handout) Think – pair – share Think – pair – share Think – pair – share Think – pair – share Buzz' groups Buzz' groups Buzz' groups Buzz' groups Round Round Round Case studies Case studies Case studies Case studies Group discussion Group discussion Group discussion Group discussion Maypole Maypole Maypole Tell your partner Tell your partner Tell your partner Tell your partner Fishbowl Fishbowl Fishbowl Peer evaluation Peer evaluation Peer evaluation Peer evaluation Role play Role play Role play Role play Presentations Presentations Presentations Syndicates Syndicates Syndicates Brainstorming Brainstorming Brainstorming 1 – 2 – 4 – more 1 – 2 – 4 – more 1 – 2 – 4 – more 1 – 2 – 4 – more

91 Think/Pair/Share Each person considers the topic/question and writes down some ideas/answers. S/he joins with one other for discussion. This provides a good basis for wider discussion.

92 Buzz Groups Working in small groups, people discuss an issue. Topics can include: How much they already know about a topic How much they already know about a topic What they are not sure about What they are not sure about What they want the lecturer to cover next What they want the lecturer to cover next

93 Round Every person takes a turn to make a statement. Useful topics: One thing I need to know about … One thing I need to know about … Something that I learned today Something that I learned today One important point (about the topic) … One important point (about the topic) …

94 Case studies A ‘story’ or scenario is presented to the group (often, but not always, as a handout). Groups discuss the story or work together on questions.

95 Group discussion Groups (up to 6 people) talk about a topic. A set of questions from the lecturer helps to structure the discussion and focus the group. The larger the group, the more difficult it is for everyone to participate actively.

96 Maypole When the leader is the central figure and communication occurs from the leader to the member and from the member to the leader

97 Tell your partner Pairs. Each person explains a topic/concept/ answer to someone else. The partner has to listen, then ask questions.

98 Fishbowl One group discusses a topic. The second group observes the discussion and each person records: One group discusses a topic. The second group observes the discussion and each person records: A partner’s contributions (and gives individual feedback afterwards), or A partner’s contributions (and gives individual feedback afterwards), or The important parts of the discussion (may be identification of issues, applications, generalizations, etc., depending on the task instructions) The important parts of the discussion (may be identification of issues, applications, generalizations, etc., depending on the task instructions)

99 Peer evaluation The class is divided into pairs. Partners exchange written work or observe each other’s oral presentation. They give each other feedback and work together to identify : The class is divided into pairs. Partners exchange written work or observe each other’s oral presentation. They give each other feedback and work together to identify : What was good What was good What needed improvement What needed improvement How it could be improved How it could be improved They can focus on delivery and/or content. This activity works best if students already have knowledge on the topic. Giving them a checklist is also a good idea. They can focus on delivery and/or content. This activity works best if students already have knowledge on the topic. Giving them a checklist is also a good idea.

100 Role play Groups/ pairs/ individuals ‘act out’ information on a specific topic, often in front of the class or group. If they lack confidence, they can work in pairs without ‘performing’ in front of the whole class. Set a time limit for each group. This activity can be used for formative or summative assessment. It is important to allow time for participants to de-role/debrief.

101 Presentations Individuals or small groups find information on a topic, then prepare and deliver a short informative session to the wider group.

102 Syndicates Groups of students work together on a project(s) which entails researching and presenting (written and/or oral) information. Useful for focusing on group and cooperative skills while covering discipline content.

103 Brainstorming Everyone thinks of as many different ideas as possible. All ideas are accepted and recorded without comment. The ideas are evaluated after a set time period or when inspiration ends.

104 1 – 2 – 4 – more Each person writes brief notes about the topic and then compares them with a partner. Each pair discusses its combined list with another couple. This provides a good basis for discussion in the wider group. It is a good idea to limit the ‘1 – 2 – 4’ stages, e.g. 2 minutes or so for individual and for paired work, 5 minutes for the ‘4’ stage.

105 Research shows there will be improvement in:

106 Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction

107 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction

108 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction Grades Grades

109 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction Grades Grades Communication skills Communication skills

110 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction Grades Grades Communication skills Communication skills Higher level thinking skills Higher level thinking skills

111 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction Grades Grades Communication skills Communication skills Higher level thinking skills Higher level thinking skills Teamwork Teamwork

112 Research shows there will be improvement in: Students – faculty interaction Students – faculty interaction Student – student interaction Student – student interaction Grades Grades Communication skills Communication skills Higher level thinking skills Higher level thinking skills Teamwork Teamwork Attitude Attitude

113 Why does it work?

114 Individuals get stuck Individuals get stuck

115 Why does it work? Individuals get stuck Individuals get stuck Exposure to alternative problem solving Exposure to alternative problem solving

116 Why does it work? Individuals get stuck Individuals get stuck Exposure to alternative problem solving Exposure to alternative problem solving Less fearful Less fearful

117 Why does it work? Individuals get stuck Individuals get stuck Exposure to alternative problem solving Exposure to alternative problem solving Less fearful Less fearful Students learn best this way Students learn best this way

118 BOPPPSBridge-in Your introduction, hook or anticipatory set Objective States what you hope to achieve and what you intend the participants to learn. Pre-assessment Assess what the learner already knows Participatory learning Learning activities to help learners meet objectives Post-Assessment Demonstrates learners learning Summary Learner reflection

119 Post - Assessment Formal or informal Formal or informal Did we accomplish our goals, achieve our objectives? Feedback for students and your teaching

120 Summary Re-enforces learning and prepares students for what is coming next. Blogto.com

121 Analysis Instructional Strategies Assessment Objectives or Learning Outcomes Content Context Learner

122 Plan a 10 minute lesson that you will facilitate during our next session.

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124 Dacola.com


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