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Multiculturalists with Concerns Jack Jedwab and Sidd Bannerjee October 8 th 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Multiculturalists with Concerns Jack Jedwab and Sidd Bannerjee October 8 th 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Multiculturalists with Concerns Jack Jedwab and Sidd Bannerjee October 8 th 2011

2  This poll was conducted online in all regions of Canada with a representative sample of 2,345 Canadians, between September 20 th and October 3 th,  Final data was weighted by age, gender, language, level of education, regions and household composition (with or without children under the age of 18) in order to obtain a representative sample of the Canada population.  A probabilistic sample of 2,345 respondents would yield a margin of error of 2%, 19 times out of 20.  Survey respondents were selected randomly from the LegerWeb Internet panel, which has over 350,000 Canadian households. A stratification process was applied to invitation lists to ensure optimal representation of respondents. The panelists were recruited randomly from Leger Marketing telephone surveys. Several quality control measures ensure the representativeness and accuracy of Leger Marketing’s surveys with its panel members.  In the tables, the numbers in bold red indicate a significantly higher proportion than that of other groups. Numbers in bold blue indicate a significantly lower proportion than that of other groups.

3  This report presents the findings of a survey conducted among a sample of 1,000 adults comprising 490 men and 510 women 18 years of age and older.  The online omnibus study is conducted once a week among an Internet representative U.K. sample of 1,000 adults 18 years of age and older. Interviewing for this survey was completed on September 16-21,  Completed interviews are weighted by five variables: age, sex, geographic region, race and education to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the total U.S. population, 18 years of age and older. The raw data are weighted by a custom designed program which automatically develops a weighting factor for each respondent. Each respondent is assigned a single weight derived from the relationship between the actual proportion of the population based on US Census data with its specific combination of age, sex, geographic characteristics, race and education and the proportion in the sample. Tabular results show both weighted and unweighted bases.  Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls. The data have been weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the 18+ population. Because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, no estimates of sampling error can be calculated. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments.  As required by the Code of Standards of the Council of American Survey Research Organizations, we will maintain the anonymity of our respondents. No information will be released that in any way will reveal the identity of a respondent. Our authorization is required for any publication of the research findings or their implications.  ORC International has exercised its best efforts in the preparation of this information. In any event, ORC assumes no responsibility for any use which is made of this information or any decisions based upon it.  This report presents the findings of a survey conducted among a sample of 1,019 adults comprising 503 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older.  The online omnibus study is conducted twice a week among a demographically representative U.S. sample of 1,000 adults 18 years of age and older. Interviewing for this survey was completed on September 15-18,  This report presents the findings of a survey conducted among a sample of 1,001 adults comprising 487 men and 514 women 18 years of age and older.  The online omnibus study is conducted once a week among an Internet representative French sample of 1,000 adults 18 years of age and older. Interviewing for this survey was completed on September 16-21, 2011.

4 CANADA

5  “It was the view of the royal commission, shared by the government and, I am sure, by all Canadians, that there cannot be one cultural policy for Canadians of British and French origin, another for the original peoples and yet a third for all others. For although there are two official languages, there is no official culture, nor does any ethnic group take precedence over any other. No citizen or group of citizens is other than Canadian, and all should be treated fairly.”

6  “A policy of multiculturalism within a bilingual framework commends itself to the government as the most suitable means of assuring the cultural freedom of Canadians. Such a policy should help break down discriminatory attitudes and cultural jealousies. National unity if it is to mean anything in the deeply personal sense, must be founded on confidence in one's own individual identity; out of this can grow respect for that of others and a willingness to share ideas, attitudes and assumptions. A vigorous policy of multiculturalism will help create this initial confidence. It can form the base of a society which is based on fair play for all.”  “The government will support and encourage the various cultures and ethnic groups that give structure and vitality to our society. They will be encouraged to share their cultural expression and values with other Canadians and so contribute to a richer life for us all.”

7 About half of Quebec Francophones say that their working or school environment is ethnically diverse, as opposed to respondents in BC and Alberta where over 2 in 3 make that claim

8 While 3 in 5 respondents disagree that ethnic diversity weakens the national culture, a sizeable minority (36%) agree with this statement. 62% of Anglophones and over 2 in 3 respondents in the Maritimes are of the opinion that having many ethnic groups does not weaken the national culture.

9 On a follow-up question regarding ethnic diversity, we asked respondents if they felt that immigrants should give up their customs and traditions and integrate into the majority culture. Some 45% believed that immigrants should integrate into the majority culture versus 49% who felt that immigrants were fine maintaining their native customs and traditions. It was Quebecers who were most likely (54%) to agree with the statement and Atlantic Canadians disagree (60%).

10 Related to the previous question, a narrow majority of responders are in favour of trying harder to accept the customs and traditions of immigrants. The widest gaps are in responses in Quebec and the Atlantic Provinces – with the former least likely to agree that the majority should try harder

11 When asked if having a linguistically, religiously and ethnically homogenous country would be preferable to a diverse country some 2 in 3 Canadians expressed a preference for a diverse population, while 3 in 10 (30%) were less supportive. Perhaps surprisingly, the highest number of respondents in favour of a uniform Canadian milieu were allophones

12 Ultimately, a substantial majority of Canadians (over 2 in 3 or 69%) believe that their society is strengthened by having many cultural and religious groups. The highest levels of support for having different cultural and religious groups is in the Maritimes (almost 4 in 5 or 79%) and lowest in Quebec (57%).

13 Although they may be divided around certain dimensions of multiculturalism, Canadians widely agree that young people should preserve their cultural traditions. Over 4 in 5 (81%) agreed that they should, and this was the case across all linguistic groups and in the regions.

14 Over and above the perceptions respondents have of diversity, we asked if they preferred to live in a neighbourhood as ethnic and cultural minorities or if they preferred living in a neighbourhood where most people share their cultural background. The results reveal that a greater percentage (49% vs. 44%) would be more comfortable living in a neighbourhood that is more culturally uniform as opposed to diverse. This is especially the case in Quebec (61%) as opposed to BC (40%).

15 Finally, we asked respondents about their actual friendships, with 2 in 3 agreeing that most of their friends were of the same ethnic or cultural background. That number goes up to nearly 4 in 5 (79%) in Quebec and is lowest amongst allophones

16 INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS

17  The Western immigrant receiving world is in a state of multicultural ambiguity.  Americans more than Canadians seem less favourable to assimilation and even the idea of living amongst their own may merely mean that they believe in cultural protection and not the rejection of others.  Still, there remains confusion about what multiculturalism means as there continues to be a widely held view that young people should preserve their cultural traditions.  On the 40th anniversary of the Multiculturalism Act, the jury is out on multiculturalism and its future is difficult to predict as the population is divided and unclear about how things it holds dear (the right to preserve its heritage) cannot be extended to all others. Multiculturally Ambiguous

18 My workplace/school is ethnically diverse United States CanadaFranceUK Strongly Agree27%31%17%19% Somewhat Agree43%42%50%48% Somewhat Disagree21%18%25% Strongly Disagree9% 8%9% Canadians are the most diverse in terms of the Workplace and/or in schools

19 I am confident when I interact with people in a culture that is unfamiliar to me United States CanadaUK Strongly Agree20%18%17% Somewhat Agree51%56% Somewhat Disagree26%22%24% Strongly Disagree3%4%3% All countries at about the same level of comfort when dealing with those from a different culture.

20 A country in which everyone speaks the same language and has similar ethnic backgrounds and religious beliefs is preferable to a country in which people speak different languages and have different ethnic backgrounds and religious beliefs United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree11% 17% Somewhat Agree30%19%37% Somewhat Disagree27%33%36% Strongly Disagree22%30%10% Canadian least likely to see homogeneity and cohesion as preferable national model (only 1 in 3); British most likely (more than 1 in 2 (54%).

21 E. I prefer living in a neighborhood where most people share my cultural background United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree14% 19% Somewhat Agree45%36%48% Somewhat Disagree32%31%27% Strongly Disagree8%13%5% Canadians least averse to living in neighbourhood that is ethnically diverse (50%); British generally prefer living in a homogenous neighbourhood (67%).

22 Young people should preserve their cultural traditions United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree34%24%19% Somewhat Agree56%57%65% Somewhat Disagree9%11%14% Strongly Disagree2% Americans most likely (90%) to want their youth to maintain their cultural traditions

23 A. Society is strengthened by having many cultural and religious groups United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree34%27%16% Somewhat Agree47%42%43% Somewhat Disagree14%17%32% Strongly Disagree5%8%9% 4 in 5 Americans likely to agree that their society is strengthened by having multiple cultural and religious groups.

24 F. Most of my friends share the same ethnic or cultural background United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree21%24%27% Somewhat Agree43%42%50% Somewhat Disagree26%22%19% Strongly Disagree10%8%4% British most likely (77%) to have friends from the same ethnic or cultural background as themselves; North Americans (65%) less likely.

25 B. Having many ethnic groups weakens the national culture United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree7%12%16% Somewhat Agree20%24%36% Somewhat Disagree40%31%35% Strongly Disagree33%29%13% 1 in 4 Americans (27%), 1 in 3 Canadians (36%) and over half (52%) of British believe that having many ethnic groups weakens their national culture.

26 C. Immigrants should give up their customs and traditions and become more like the majority United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree8%17%15% Somewhat Agree21%29%34% Somewhat Disagree44%32%40% Strongly Disagree28%17%11% Americans least likely (29%), followed by Canadians (46%) and British (49%) to feel that immigrants should give up their customs and traditions and become more like the majority culture.

27 D. The majority should try harder to accept the customs and traditions of cultural and religious groups United StatesCanadaUK Strongly Agree22%15%13% Somewhat Agree45%36%49% Somewhat Disagree25%28%30% Strongly Disagree9%15%8% Canadians least likely (51%) to believe that the majority should try harder to accept the customs and traditions of the cultural and religious groups; followed by British (62%) and Americans (66%).


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