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© Yankelovich 2006 1 Kids and Family Reading Report™ Harry Potter: The Power of One Book July 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "© Yankelovich 2006 1 Kids and Family Reading Report™ Harry Potter: The Power of One Book July 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Yankelovich Kids and Family Reading Report™ Harry Potter: The Power of One Book July 2006

2 © Yankelovich Background The following deck highlights findings from The Kids and Family Reading Report* that quantify the impact of Harry Potter on kids’ reading attitudes and behaviors. *The Scholastic Kids and Family Reading Report  is available online at

3 © Yankelovich Methodology Interviews for The Kids and Family Reading Report were conducted from January 16 – February 8, 2006 with 1,000 individuals—500 children and one parent or primary guardian per child. –The series of questions about Harry Potter was a subset of a larger body of research about kids’ and parents’ reading attitudes and behaviors.* Parents/primary guardians were recruited via mall-intercept in 25 major cities across the US. They were screened to meet the following criteria: –Have at least one child ages 5-17 present during the time of the intercept at the mall. –Be related to the child either as parent, grandparent or caretaker. Upon eligibility, the parent or primary guardian completed the survey themselves using a computer. –Children ages 5-8 (and others as necessary) were read the survey by professional interviewers and asked to answer; all other children completed the survey themselves using a computer. *The Scholastic Kids and Family Reading Report  is available online at

4 © Yankelovich Methodology Cont’d Quotas for race, gender and child age-group were established to ensure ample base sizes for analysis purposes. The final data were weighted by the following variables to ensure sample representation of the US market: –Region –Race –Child’s Age –Parent’s Age (by gender) –Parent’s Marital Status –Parent’s Education (by gender) Significance testing between groups has been done at the 90% confidence levels, and are designated by the following notations throughout this report: The margin of error is ± 4.5 percentage points. Significantly higher at 90% confidence interval = Significantly lower at 90% confidence interval =

5 © Yankelovich Sample Overview* Age GroupsParents’ Age 5-832%Under 251% % % % % % % Average Age of children in Sample % Average Age of Parent39.9 Children’s Gender Male49%Household Income Female51%Under $50K55% $50K +45% RaceMedian Household Income$47.5K Caucasian65% African American15%Parents’ Gender Hispanic Origin/Decent16%Male25% Asian3%Female75% Other2% Parents Employed 80% Parents’ Marital Status Married/Unmarried & Living Together 78% Parents’ Educational Status Never Married11% Less Than Some College 37% Divorced/Separated/Widowed11% Some College or More63% *Total kids sample (n = 500)

6 © Yankelovich Study Highlights Harry Potter has a positive impact on kids’ reading and their performance in school, and their parents agree. –51% of Harry Potter readers ages 5-17 years old say they did not read books for fun before they started reading the series. –65% say they have been doing better in school since reading Harry Potter and 76% of parents agree. The positive impact of Harry Potter on kids’ reading is particularly strong among boys. –More boys than girls have read Harry Potter (57% vs. 51%, respectively). –61% of boys agree that they did not read for fun before they started reading Harry Potter, compared to 41% of girls. Kids indicate they have trouble finding books they like and kids’ reading drops off sharply after age 8. However, on average, Harry Potter readers start reading the series at age 9 and they continue as they mature. –68% of 5-17 year olds are interested in reading or re-reading Harry Potter books in the future. After the release of the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series, many readers will be in search of a new series to read. –One in five Harry Potter readers do not believe it will be over and 51% say they are going to look for a new book series to read, and one in three will re-read the books.

7 © Yankelovich Half Of All Parents And Kids Have Read Harry Potter KidsParents 500 % Who Read Harry Potter 54%50%

8 © Yankelovich Half Of Harry Potter Readers Say They Did Not Read Books For Fun Before Harry Potter; Parents Agree % Who Agree “A Lot/A Little” Kids* 286 I didn't read books for fun before I started reading Harry Potter 51% % Who Agree “Strongly/Somewhat” Parents** 260 Before reading Harry Potter, my child didn’t enjoy reading for fun 51% * Asked of kids who say they have read Harry Potter or that their parents have read Harry Potter to them. ** Asked of parents who say their child has read Harry Potter.

9 © Yankelovich The Majority Of Harry Potter Readers Say The Series Has Made Them Interested In Reading Other Books And Helped Them Perform Better In School Harry Potter Readers % Who Agree “A Lot/A Little” 286 Reading (or 'Listening to my parent read') Harry Potter has made me interested in reading other books 76 I've been doing better in school since I/my parents started reading Harry Potter books 65 Kids’ Attitudes Towards Reading Harry Potter

10 © Yankelovich All Kids Read Harry Potter Did Not Read Harry Potter % Answering… Their Grades Are “Better” Than Peers Their Reading Abilities Are “Better” Than Peers Describe Themselves As “Good Student” Describe Themselves As “Smart” Describe Themselves As “Leader” How Readers Of Harry Potter Perceive Themselves Compared To Other Kids Harry Potter Readers Perceive Themselves As Better Students

11 © Yankelovich Harry Potter Readers Are More Likely To Consider Reading Important And Beneficial All Kids Read Harry Potter Did Not Read Harry Potter % Answering… Reading For Fun Is “Very Important” I need to be a strong reader so I can get a good job when I’m older Reading Valuation Among Harry Potter Readers Versus Non-Harry Potter Readers % Agree “A Lot” That…

12 © Yankelovich Parents See Positive Results Of Kids’ Reading Harry Potter Parents % Who Agree “Strongly/Somewhat” 260 Reading Harry Potter has helped my child enjoy reading more 89 Reading Harry Potter has made my child want to read more frequently 85 Reading Harry Potter has helped my child in school76 Before reading Harry Potter, my child didn't enjoy reading for fun 51 Parents’ Attitudes Towards Their Child Reading Harry Potter* *Asked of parents who say their child has read Harry Potter.

13 © Yankelovich Boys Are More Likely Than Girls To Have Read Harry Potter Gender TotalBoy Girl Have Read Harry Potter54%57%51% Interested In Reading/ Re-Reading Harry Potter 68%

14 © Yankelovich The Impact of Harry Potter Is Particularly Strong Among Boys Boys who have read the Harry Potter series are more likely than girls to agree that they did not read books for fun before Harry Potter. Findings among parents support this view. % Who Agree “A Lot/A Little” Boys*Girls* I didn't read books for fun before I started reading Harry Potter 61%41% % Who Agree “Strongly/Somewhat” Parents of Boys** Parents of Girls** Before reading Harry Potter, my child didn’t enjoy reading for fun 55%45% * Asked of kids who say they have read Harry Potter or that their parents have read Harry Potter to them. ** Asked of parents who say their child has read Harry Potter.

15 © Yankelovich The Majority Of Boys Say It Is Important To Read Harry Potter To Feel “In” With Their Friends % Who Agree “A Lot/A Little” BoysGirls It is important for me to read Harry Potter so I feel “in” with my friends 63%44% Harry Potter Readers

16 © Yankelovich Harry Potter Is Popular Among Kids Nine Years Old and Up Age Total Have Read Harry Potter54%39%59%63%57% Interested In Reading/ Re-Reading Harry Potter 68% 70%69%60% On average, kids say they start reading Harry Potter at age 9.

17 © Yankelovich Harry Potter Readers Remain Loyal To The Series 90% of Harry Potter readers are interested in reading or re-reading books from the series in the future. 84% of Harry Potter readers plan to read all the books in the series.

18 © Yankelovich After The Seventh Harry Potter Book, Many Readers Will Be In Search Of A New Book Series Harry Potter Readers Say They Will Do The Following When There Are No More (New) Harry Potter Books Nearly one in five (19%) Harry Potter readers say they do not believe the series will really be over after the seventh book.

19 © Yankelovich Kids Think Harry Potter Is One Of The Best Books For Young Readers, And Parents Agree On an unaided basis, one in three (33%) kids say Harry Potter is among the best books for someone their age to read. –9-11 year olds are most likely to hold this view at 44%. –Just over half (54%) of Harry Potter readers have this opinion; however boy readers are more likely than girl readers to hold this view (60% vs. 47%, respectively). –The next most popular mentions are Goosebumps at 8%, and Dr. Seuss and Lemony Snicket books at 6%. Unprompted, 34% of parents say Harry Potter is a “must read” for kids and teens. –Parents of 9-11 year olds are most likely to hold this view at 44%. –Half (49%) of parents whose children have read Harry Potter have this opinion. –The next most commonly mentioned “must read” children’s book is Dr. Seuss at 12%.


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