Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

What Works Best to Motivate Students in Introductory Economics Course Dr. Sakib Mahmud UW-Superior.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "What Works Best to Motivate Students in Introductory Economics Course Dr. Sakib Mahmud UW-Superior."— Presentation transcript:

1 What Works Best to Motivate Students in Introductory Economics Course Dr. Sakib Mahmud UW-Superior

2 Background WHERE is the research gap? Learner-centered techniques to increase student motivation in Economics WHAT? General perception: economics is difficult (Bartlett, 1995; Andreopoulus and Panayides, 2011 WHY? Teaching style Methods of teaching Course content (Jensen and Owen, 2003; Lee et al., 2002, Bartlett, 1995) HOW? Less emphasis on active and cooperative learning environments (Watt and Becker, 2008; Yamarik, 2007)

3 2010 Survey of US Academic Economists: Undergraduate Economic Courses  Median respondents are involved with lecturing 83% of their class time  Median amount of time spent for writing texts and graphs on the whiteboard or chalkboard is also 83% for undergraduate economics courses.  Median use of team teaching and student self-assessment techniques, such as the one-minute paper, is zero.  Cooperative learning and small–group assignments are rarely used.  A small percentage of instructors used classroom experiments in all levels of economics courses.  Alternative classroom-assessment techniques, such as writing assignments, group projects, in-class discussion assignments, are occasionally used. [Source: Watts and Schaur (2011)]

4 Background  Question arise how student motivation might be affected by such trends in economics teaching and learning.  Identifying factors to establish the link between student motivation and academic achievement in general (Meece et al. 2006; Ambrose et al. 2010)  However, there is no research on how learner-centered techniques can influence student motivation when dealing with economics courses.

5 Background WHERE is the research gap? Learner-centered techniques to increase student motivation in Economics WHAT? General perception: economics is difficult (Bartlett, 1995; Andreopoulus and Panayides, 2011 WHY? Teaching style Methods of teaching Course content (Jensen and Owen, 2003; Lee et al., 2002, Bartlett, 1995) HOW? Less emphasis on active and cooperative learning environments (Watt and Becker, 2008; Yamarik, 2007)

6 Research Objective What student-centered learning techniques might work to develop interest, increase attention, and generate motivation among students to have a positive learning experience with a general education introductory economics course?

7 Methodology Concurrent Triangulation Mixed Method Approach Quantitative data collection and analysis (QUAN) Qualitative data collection and analysis (QUAL) Compare or Relate and Interpretation

8 Why Mixed Methods Research?  With the research focus on student motivation, relying on only quantitative measures could miss out on capturing the richness of experiences, thought processes, and conceptual paths followed by the students.  Incorporating qualitative evidence in the research design has the ability to fill in the gaps by making learning processes and pitfalls transparent in ways quantitative evidence cannot.  By allowing for mixed methods research, objective is to identify some patterns from student self-reported perceptions through qualitative data analysis that can address any unanswered questions arising from the quantitative data.

9 Data Collection CETL SOTL Project  Pre-and-Post Online Anonymous Questionnaire Surveys  Short Reflection Notes – after 2 nd, 8 th, and 13 th week of the semester  Two courses: (1) Economics in Society – Fall 2013 and Spring 2014; and, (2) Principles of Microeconomics – Spring 2014  Total observations: 56

10 Quantitative Pre-Survey Results

11 Quantitative Post-Survey Results

12 Quantitative Pre-Survey Results

13 Quantitative Post-Survey Results

14 Quantitative Pre-Survey Results

15 Quantitative Post-Survey Results

16 Qualitative Short-Reflections Results

17

18 Compare /Relate and Interpretation 1)Student motivational factors: During the beginning of a regular semester, there are convergences between the two sources of information regarding the student motivational factors. By the end of the semester, divergences between the two sources of information become more prominent.

19 Compare /Relate and Interpretation 2)Preferred student-learning techniques: Active learning based on in-class discussion and exercises, group project, and pair-wise homework assignments are considered to be most effective in motivating students. Quizzes or exams became the most effective motivational factor at the end-of-the-semester. This could be associated with students concern about their expected ‘final grade,’ which is evident from student self-reported short reflection note after the 8 th week of the semester.

20 Conclusion  Equal weightage to both traditional and alternative classroom- assessment techniques might downgrade the student fear of achievement goals failure. Student intrinsic motivation level might increase Students can emphasize more on learning rather than focusing more on what might be their expected final grades.  What about ‘loss aversion’ based grading scheme? If people dislike losses more than they enjoy gains (Kahneman and Tversky, 1979; Kahneman, 2013), one can expect higher student performance by framing grades as a point of reduction, as opposed to earning points throughout the semester.

21 Future Directions  To test the validity of the ‘loss aversion’ based grading scheme and its influence on student motivation and learning, started collecting data on the same courses with different sets of students this spring of  As a Wisconsin Teaching Fellow: Expected to share preliminary findings of the study in scholarship of teaching and learning workshops and conferences.  I look forward to see which directions the research goes from there.

22 Acknowledgement Thanks to the UW-Superior CETL office and Dr. Hilary Fezzey for their support of this project. Also, thanks to Dr. Tanzeem Iqbal Ali, for feedback and suggestions at different phases of the project.

23 References  Andreopoulos, G. C., & Panayides, A. (2011). Teaching Economics To The Best Undergraduates: What Are The Problems?. American Journal of Business Education (AJBE), 2(6).  Bartlett, R. L. (1995). Attracting “Otherwise Bright Students" to Economics 101. The American Economic Review, 85(2),  Creswell, J.W. (2014). Research Design: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Method Approaches. Sage Publications, Inc.,  Jensen, J.E., and Owen, A. (2003). Appealing to Good Students in Introductory Economics. Journal of Economic Education, 32,  Watts, M., & Becker, W. E. (2008). A Little More than Chalk and Talk: Results from a Third National Survey of Teaching Methods in Undergraduate Economics Courses. The Journal of Economic Education, 39(3),  Yamarik, S. (2007). Does cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?. The Journal of Economic Education, 38(3),

24 Thank you


Download ppt "What Works Best to Motivate Students in Introductory Economics Course Dr. Sakib Mahmud UW-Superior."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google