Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

GENERAL RULES FOR HANDLING REFRIGERANT GAS CYLINDERS © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "GENERAL RULES FOR HANDLING REFRIGERANT GAS CYLINDERS © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence."— Presentation transcript:

1 GENERAL RULES FOR HANDLING REFRIGERANT GAS CYLINDERS © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

2  Safety should always be a major consideration when refrigerant gas cylinders are moved, particularly when they are transported in the back of service trucks in summer.  Cylinders should be filled to no more than 80% of their maximum possible contents or volume as recommended in Australian Standards. Don’t overfill them because high pressure can cause the hydraulic lock to burst.  Let’s look at some basic rules that apply to the handling of all refrigerant gas cylinders. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

3  Wear goggles or face shields, gloves and safety footwear when filling cylinders, coupling up storage vessels and/or handling bulk fills. This helps prevent eye damage or burns that could occur if a coupling breaks or a line bursts. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

4  Store cylinders in a cool, dry place away from direct sources of heat.  A well ventilated area will ensure that no build up of gas can occur if a cylinder leaks or a relief valve fails. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

5  Make sure cylinder connections fit easily and snugly.  You should never force connections.Always use the correct tools when tightening or loosening fittings. The use of incorrect tools can strip threads or damage fittings, which can cause leaks and possible loss of refrigerant gas to the atmosphere.  You should never force connections. Always use the correct tools when tightening or loosening fittings. The use of incorrect tools can strip threads or damage fittings, which can cause leaks and possible loss of refrigerant gas to the atmosphere. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

6  Don’t use cylinders as ‘rollers’ or supports as cuts and abrasions on the cylinder body or yourself may result. Care in handling cylinders will prolong their life. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

7  The colour of cylinders cannot be relied on for positive identification. Labels should always be read carefully. If still in doubt, other methods of identification are available such as pressure/temperature relationships or other methods available from the manufacturer or supplier of the refrigerant. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

8  Each time a cylinder is returned for recharging, it should be carefully examined for evidence of corrosion, cuts, dents and bulges. The condition of threads and valves should be checked to make sure the cylinder is suitable for further service.  Each state has codes that guide the examination and testing of cylinders to help ensure their continued safe use. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

9  Refrigerant cylinders are labelled and identified for a particular refrigerant.  Never mix refrigerants or use unmarked cylinders. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

10  No part of any cylinder should ever be near a direct flame, steam or temperatures exceeding 50 °C.  If it is necessary to warm a cylinder to promote more rapid discharge, extreme caution should be taken. An easy and safe way is to place the bottom part of a cylinder in a container of lukewarm water at about 45 °C. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

11  The pressure within the cylinder must be greater than in the system into which it is being transferred.  Always check pressure before charging.  Never refill disposable cylinders. Most have safety devices, such as a one- way valve, to stop this occurring. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

12  Make sure normal cylinders are inspected at 10 year intervals. State, territory and federal codes set out the requirements for checking pressurised vessels. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

13  Do not block the safety valve in the stem as this could lead to the cylinder rupturing. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

14  Cylinders must have a 3% ullage or vapour space at 57 °C. Ullage space is the space provided for vapour volume in a cylinder in hot conditions. This is specified in Australian Standard © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence

15  Remember to ask your workplace manager or trainer if you are unsure of anything or want to check you are working safely. © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence


Download ppt "GENERAL RULES FOR HANDLING REFRIGERANT GAS CYLINDERS © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 | Licensed under AEShareNet Share and Return licence."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google