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The Evidence Professor Dr Anne Bamford Engine Room University of the Arts London

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Presentation on theme: "The Evidence Professor Dr Anne Bamford Engine Room University of the Arts London"— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Evidence Professor Dr Anne Bamford Engine Room University of the Arts London

3 Outline… Why? The child The school The world

4 Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts

5 THE COMMONWEALTH FOUNDATION RECOGNISES THAT CULTURE SHOULD BE CENTRAL IN GOVERNANCE AND DEVELOPMENT. OUR WORK HAS SHOWN THAT DEVELOPMENT WITHOUT CUTURE IS OF LITTLE VALUE. IT HIGHLIGHTS THE USES OF CULTURE TO ACHIEVE GOOD GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY OBJECTIVES AND RESPOND TO AND MEET HUMAN DEVELOPMENT NEEDS.

6 Cultural capital Studies have shown that a lack of familiarity with particular forms of culture and a lack of sophisticated cultural vocabulary can limit people’s confidence in certain social settings and deny them access to opportunities that might contribute to upward social mobility.

7 Portrait of an arts- rich 20 year old Catterall 2009 USA More likely to enrol in college/higher education (> 17.6%) More likely to volunteer (15.4%) More likely to have strong friendships (8.6%) More likely to vote (20%) 10% less likely to not be in either employment or education at aged 20.

8 Portrait of an arts- rich 26 year old Catterall 2009 USA Continue to do better than people who attended non- arts-rich schools. Found better jobs (Arts poor students were 5 times as likely to report dependence on public assistance at age 26.)

9 The National Endowment for Science (UK), Technology and the Arts suggests that between 2009 and 2013 the UK creative industries, which are responsible for films, music, fashion, TV and video games production, will outstrip the rest of the economy in terms of growth by 4% on average. By 2013, the sector is expected to employ 1.3 million people. Employment growth

10 By 2025 we may expect to inhabit a world of digitally-enabled mass collaboration built on “fast, fat mobile pipes and smart networks”, connected by the Internet to limitless computing power and – most importantly – to billions of human beings and inanimate objects. It is self evident that digital communications are already changing traditional models of production, supply and demand at every level of the value chain for ever increasing numbers of economic sectors and actors.

11 Employability NESTA have evidence that suggests the soft skills employers are looking for are (in order of stated importance): Communication skills Teamworking skills Confidence. The ‘Russell Group of Universities’ (UK) state that universities and employers are using such extra- curricular activities to differentiate between candidates for places and jobs.

12 Why? The school

13 Arts rich schools More emphasis on problem solving than rules in Maths More likely to teach in smaller groups More likely to read literature More likely to get pupils to write Happier students Happier teacher Less likely to lecture to pupils Less serious behaviour problems Less lateness and absenteeism

14 communication skills analytical and problem solving skills creative talents social awareness self esteem and confidence quality of life and well being personal growth in the sense of a transformation of identity feelings of self-determination sense of control pleasure and enjoyment and increased artistic skill Personal Impacts

15 Social impacts Communication: Communication of ideas, information and values; skills in planning and organizing; improving understanding of different cultures and lifestyles. Partnership building: Building and developing communities; contribution to developing sense of community identity; social cohesion; recreational opportunities; improvement of public facilities and amenities; and, helping to convey the heritage of an area.

16 Why: Global reasons

17 Road Map Recommendations 2006, Advocacy Government ministries must work together Research Continuity of provisions Partnerships and cooperation Professional formation Evaluation Publication and sharing

18 World Economic Forum, Davos 2006 The arts will be a major force in economic development. The so-called creative industries are emerging as the largest single sector of economic activity in many countries and as the driving force of the ‘tiger’ economies of India, China and Korea.

19 European Year of Creativity, 2009 Dr Milan Zver "the creative and innovative potential of European citizens represents the key pillar on which not only the future European economic prosperity, but also its cultural development, will be based."

20 FINANCE MINISTER The creative industries and the arts can be our comparative advantage. That is why the government must provide funding to maintain our edge. Claus Hjort Frederiksen, April 8, 2010, Copenhagen

21 SOME OF THE MOST CREATIVE STRATEGIES LIVE IN THE INTERSECTIONS OF DISCIPLINES, SECTORS, CULTURES AND GENERATIONS.

22 Human capital Openness and diversity Cultural environment Technology Institutional and regulatory environment Creative outputs Pillars of Innovation

23 Human Capital Hours on arts and cultural education in schools Number of arts schools per million people Tertiary students studying in the field of culture Cultural employment as a % of overall employment

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25 In Malta The National Curriculum Conference (2000) identified a series of national and international measures which had negatively impacted upon creativity. E.g. a rigid timetable, formal class- management protocol, syllabus overload, discouragement of students from taking ownership of learning, emphasis on competition and external rewards and teachers' own limitations in the creative sector In 2002, the Education Division introduced the post of "creativity teachers" with the aim of accelerating artistic development in schools. There are currently around 150 ‘creativity teachers’ in schools in Malta.

26 Creative PISA? Sub-category within PISA (i.e. more creative questions) “The development of an instrument to test creativity in all European Member States could be considered” “This feasibility study provides the green light to start the process of developing a tool to measure creativity (internationally). “Such a project would require an important amount of investment and political will.” Ernesto Villalba 2008

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28 Making evidence work Passions/beliefs and values Ownership and clarity of vision and aspirations Context Capacity and capability Methods and structures Reflections Actions Communication

29 Advocacy, awareness-raising and educational planning A lack of knowledge of what to advocate hands-on-training on how to integrate evidence and present it in a clear, coherent and convincing fashion

30 Advocacy for what? Greater participation Greater access Greater quality of learning and teaching Greater innovative curricula Greater parental support Greater arts community collaborations

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